Definition of Indus. Meaning of Indus. Synonyms of Indus

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Definition of Indus

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Haliastur Indus
Kite Kite, n. [OE. kyte, AS. c?ta; cf. W. cud, cut.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any raptorial bird of the subfamily Milvin[ae], of which many species are known. They have long wings, adapted for soaring, and usually a forked tail. Note: The European species are Milvus ictinus and M. govinda; the sacred or Brahmany kite of India is Haliastur Indus; the American fork-tailed kite is the Nauclerus furcatus. 2. Fig. : One who is rapacious. Detested kite, thou liest. --Shak. 3. A light frame of wood or other material covered with paper or cloth, for flying in the air at the end of a string. 4. (Naut.) A lofty sail, carried only when the wind is light. 5. (Geom.) A quadrilateral, one of whose diagonals is an axis of symmetry. --Henrici. 6. Fictitious commercial paper used for raising money or to sustain credit, as a check which represents no deposit in bank, or a bill of exchange not sanctioned by sale of goods; an accommodation check or bill. [Cant] 7. (Zo["o]l.) The brill. [Prov. Eng. ] Flying kites. (Naut.) See under Flying. Kite falcon (Zo["o]l.), an African falcon of the genus Avicida, having some resemblance to a kite.
Hindus
Hindoo Hin"doo, Hindu Hin"du (?; 277), n.; pl. Hindoosor Hindus. [Per. Hind[=u], fr. Hind, Hind[=u]st[=a]n, India. Cf. Indian.] A native inhabitant of Hindostan. As an ethnical term it is confined to the Dravidian and Aryan races; as a religious name it is restricted to followers of the Veda.
Hindustanee
Urdu Ur"du, n. [Hind. urd[=u].] The language more generally called Hindustanee.
Hindustani
Hindoostanee Hin"doo*sta"nee, Hindustani Hin"du*sta"ni, a. [Hind. Hind[=u]st[=a]n[=i] an Indian, fr. Hind. and Per. Hind[=u]st[=a]n India.] Of or pertaining to the Hindoos or their language. -- n. The language of Hindostan; the name given by Europeans to the most generally spoken of the modern Aryan languages of India. It is Hindi with the addition of Persian and Arabic words.
Indusia
Indusium In*du"si*um, n.; pl. Indusia (-[.a]). [L., an under garment, fr. induere to put on: cf. F. indusie the covering of the seed spots of ferns.] (Bot.) (a) A collection of hairs united so as to form a sort of cup, and inclosing the stigma of a flower. (b) The immediate covering of the fruit dots or sori in many ferns, usually a very thin scale attached by the middle or side to a veinlet. (c) A peculiar covering found in certain fungi.
Indusial
Indusial In*du"sial, a. [See Indusium.] Of, pertaining to, or containing, the petrified cases of the larv[ae] of certain insects. Indusial limestone (Geol.), a fresh-water limestone, largely composed of the agglomerated cases of caddice worms, or larv[ae] of caddice flies (Phryganea). It is found in Miocene strata of Auvergne, France, and some other localities.
Indusial limestone
Indusial In*du"sial, a. [See Indusium.] Of, pertaining to, or containing, the petrified cases of the larv[ae] of certain insects. Indusial limestone (Geol.), a fresh-water limestone, largely composed of the agglomerated cases of caddice worms, or larv[ae] of caddice flies (Phryganea). It is found in Miocene strata of Auvergne, France, and some other localities.
Indusiate
Indusiate In*du"si*ate, Indusiated In*du"si*a`ted, a. (Bot.) Furnished with an indusium.
Indusiated
Indusiate In*du"si*ate, Indusiated In*du"si*a`ted, a. (Bot.) Furnished with an indusium.
Indusium
Indusium In*du"si*um, n.; pl. Indusia (-[.a]). [L., an under garment, fr. induere to put on: cf. F. indusie the covering of the seed spots of ferns.] (Bot.) (a) A collection of hairs united so as to form a sort of cup, and inclosing the stigma of a flower. (b) The immediate covering of the fruit dots or sori in many ferns, usually a very thin scale attached by the middle or side to a veinlet. (c) A peculiar covering found in certain fungi.
Industrial
Industrial In*dus"tri*al, a. [Cf. F. industriel, LL. industrialis. See Industry.] Consisting in industry; pertaining to industry, or the arts and products of industry; concerning those employed in labor, especially in manual labor, and their wages, duties, and rights. The great ideas of industrial development and economic social amelioration. --M. Arnold.
Industrial exhibition
Industrial exhibition, a public exhibition of the various industrial products of a country, or of various countries. Industrial school, a school for teaching one or more branches of industry; also, a school for educating neglected children, and training them to habits of industry.
Industrial school
Industrial exhibition, a public exhibition of the various industrial products of a country, or of various countries. Industrial school, a school for teaching one or more branches of industry; also, a school for educating neglected children, and training them to habits of industry.
Industrialism
Industrialism In*dus"tri*al*ism, n. 1. Devotion to industrial pursuits; labor; industry. --J. S. Mill. 2. The principles or policy applicable to industrial pursuits or organized labor. Industrialism must not confounded with industriousness. --H. Spencer.
Industrially
Industrially In*dus"tri*al*ly, adv. With reference to industry.
Industries
Industry In"dus*try, n.; pl. Industries. [L. industria, cf. industrius diligent; of uncertain origin: cf. F. industrie.] 1. Habitual diligence in any employment or pursuit, either bodily or mental; steady attention to business; assiduity; -- opposed to sloth and idleness; as, industry pays debts, while idleness or despair will increase them. We are more industrious than our forefathers, because in the present times the funds destined for the maintenance of industry are much greater in proportion to those which are likely to be employed in the maintenance of idleness, than they were two or three centuries ago. --A. Smith. 2. Any department or branch of art, occupation, or business; especially, one which employs much labor and capital and is a distinct branch of trade; as, the sugar industry; the iron industry; the cotton industry. 3. (Polit. Econ.) Human exertion of any kind employed for the creation of value, and regarded by some as a species of capital or wealth; labor. Syn: Diligence; assiduity; perseverance; activity; laboriousness; attention. See Diligence.
Industrious
Industrious In*dus"tri*ous, a. [L. industrius, industriosus: cf. F. industrieux. See Industry.] 1. Given to industry; characterized by diligence; constantly, regularly, or habitually occupied; busy; assiduous; not slothful or idle; -- commonly implying devotion to lawful and useful labor. Frugal and industrious men are commonly friendly to the established government. --Sir W. Temple. 2. Steadily and perseveringly active in a particular pursuit or aim; as, he was negligent in business, but industrious in pleasure; an industrious mischief maker. Industrious to seek out the truth of all things. --Spenser. -- In*dus"tri*ous*ly, adv. -- In*dus"tri*ous*ness, n.
Industriously
Industrious In*dus"tri*ous, a. [L. industrius, industriosus: cf. F. industrieux. See Industry.] 1. Given to industry; characterized by diligence; constantly, regularly, or habitually occupied; busy; assiduous; not slothful or idle; -- commonly implying devotion to lawful and useful labor. Frugal and industrious men are commonly friendly to the established government. --Sir W. Temple. 2. Steadily and perseveringly active in a particular pursuit or aim; as, he was negligent in business, but industrious in pleasure; an industrious mischief maker. Industrious to seek out the truth of all things. --Spenser. -- In*dus"tri*ous*ly, adv. -- In*dus"tri*ous*ness, n.
Industriousness
Industrious In*dus"tri*ous, a. [L. industrius, industriosus: cf. F. industrieux. See Industry.] 1. Given to industry; characterized by diligence; constantly, regularly, or habitually occupied; busy; assiduous; not slothful or idle; -- commonly implying devotion to lawful and useful labor. Frugal and industrious men are commonly friendly to the established government. --Sir W. Temple. 2. Steadily and perseveringly active in a particular pursuit or aim; as, he was negligent in business, but industrious in pleasure; an industrious mischief maker. Industrious to seek out the truth of all things. --Spenser. -- In*dus"tri*ous*ly, adv. -- In*dus"tri*ous*ness, n.
Industry
Industry In"dus*try, n.; pl. Industries. [L. industria, cf. industrius diligent; of uncertain origin: cf. F. industrie.] 1. Habitual diligence in any employment or pursuit, either bodily or mental; steady attention to business; assiduity; -- opposed to sloth and idleness; as, industry pays debts, while idleness or despair will increase them. We are more industrious than our forefathers, because in the present times the funds destined for the maintenance of industry are much greater in proportion to those which are likely to be employed in the maintenance of idleness, than they were two or three centuries ago. --A. Smith. 2. Any department or branch of art, occupation, or business; especially, one which employs much labor and capital and is a distinct branch of trade; as, the sugar industry; the iron industry; the cotton industry. 3. (Polit. Econ.) Human exertion of any kind employed for the creation of value, and regarded by some as a species of capital or wealth; labor. Syn: Diligence; assiduity; perseverance; activity; laboriousness; attention. See Diligence.
Sapindus
Sapindus Sa*pin"dus, n. [NL., fr. L. sapo soap + Indicus Indian.] (Bot.) A genus of tropical and subtropical trees with pinnate leaves and panicled flowers. The fruits of some species are used instead of soap, and their round black seeds are made into necklaces.
Sapindus saponaria
Soapberry tree Soap"ber`ry tree` (Bot.) Any tree of the genus Sapindus, esp. Sapindus saponaria, the fleshy part of whose fruit is used instead of soap in washing linen; -- also called soap tree.
Tamarindus Indica
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.

Meaning of Indus from wikipedia

- the Indus. The Indus also supports many heavy industries and provides the main supply of potable water in ****stan. The ultimate source of the Indus is...
- like leading Finnish Indologist, Asko Parpola. The Indus Valley Civilisation is named after the Indus river system in whose alluvial plains the early sites...
- The Indus script (also known as the Harappan script) is a corpus of symbols produced by the Indus Valley Civilization. Most inscriptions containing these...
- Indus Motor Company Limited (Urdu: انڈس موٹر شرکه محدودہ‎), operating as Toyota Indus, is a ****stani automobile manufacturer which is a subsidiary of...
- The Indus Waters Treaty is a water-distribution treaty between India and ****stan, brokered by the World Bank, to use the water available in the Indus System...
- Former locations served by the airline include: The Air Indus frequent flyer program was called Indus Miles. The program offered various privileges including...
- India, Bangladesh, and Nepal, while the Indus river dolphin is now found only in the main channel of the Indus River in ****stan and active channels connected...
- country, Indus has the widest coverage in India and has already achieved 288,013 tenancies, a first in the telecom tower industry globally. Indus Towers...
- Indus Arthur (born Indus Jo Saugstad; April 28, 1941 – December 29, 1984) was a 1960s film and television actress. Arthur was from Los Angeles County....
- The Battle of the Indus was fought at the Indus river, in the year 1221 between Jalal ad-Din Mingburnu, the sultan of the Khwarezmian dynasty and his...
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