Definition of Imaginary calculus. Meaning of Imaginary calculus. Synonyms of Imaginary calculus

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Imaginary calculus. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Imaginary calculus and, of course, Imaginary calculus synonyms and on the right images related to the word Imaginary calculus.

Definition of Imaginary calculus

Imaginary calculus
Calculus Cal"cu*lus, n.; pl. Calculi. [L, calculus. See Calculate, and Calcule.] 1. (Med.) Any solid concretion, formed in any part of the body, but most frequent in the organs that act as reservoirs, and in the passages connected with them; as, biliary calculi; urinary calculi, etc. 2. (Math.) A method of computation; any process of reasoning by the use of symbols; any branch of mathematics that may involve calculation. Barycentric calculus, a method of treating geometry by defining a point as the center of gravity of certain other points to which co["e]fficients or weights are ascribed. Calculus of functions, that branch of mathematics which treats of the forms of functions that shall satisfy given conditions. Calculus of operations, that branch of mathematical logic that treats of all operations that satisfy given conditions. Calculus of probabilities, the science that treats of the computation of the probabilities of events, or the application of numbers to chance. Calculus of variations, a branch of mathematics in which the laws of dependence which bind the variable quantities together are themselves subject to change. Differential calculus, a method of investigating mathematical questions by using the ratio of certain indefinitely small quantities called differentials. The problems are primarily of this form: to find how the change in some variable quantity alters at each instant the value of a quantity dependent upon it. Exponential calculus, that part of algebra which treats of exponents. Imaginary calculus, a method of investigating the relations of real or imaginary quantities by the use of the imaginary symbols and quantities of algebra. Integral calculus, a method which in the reverse of the differential, the primary object of which is to learn from the known ratio of the indefinitely small changes of two or more magnitudes, the relation of the magnitudes themselves, or, in other words, from having the differential of an algebraic expression to find the expression itself.
Imaginary calculus
Imaginary Im*ag"i*na*ry, a. [L. imaginarius: cf. F. imaginaire.] Existing only in imagination or fancy; not real; fancied; visionary; ideal. Wilt thou add to all the griefs I suffer Imaginary ills and fancied tortures? --Addison. Imaginary calculus See under Calculus. Imaginary expression or quantity (Alg.), an algebraic expression which involves the impossible operation of taking the square root of a negative quantity; as, [root]-9, a + b [root]-1. Imaginary points, lines, surfaces, etc. (Geom.), points, lines, surfaces, etc., imagined to exist, although by reason of certain changes of a figure they have in fact ceased to have a real existence. Syn: Ideal; fanciful; chimerical; visionary; fancied; unreal; illusive.

Meaning of Imaginary calculus from wikipedia

- called the impedance. This approach is called phasor calculus. In electrical engineering, the imaginary unit is denoted by j, to avoid confusion with I, which...
- Fractional calculus is a branch of mathematical analysis that studies the several different possibilities of defining real number powers or complex number...
- context of real and complex numbers and functions. Analysis evolved from calculus, which involves the elementary concepts and techniques of analysis. Analysis...
- In optics, polarized light can be described using the Jones calculus, discovered by R. C. Jones in 1941. Polarized light is represented by a Jones vector...
- writing definitions for existing ones. This glossary of calculus is a list of definitions about calculus, its sub-disciplines, and related fields. Contents: ...
- (stone), and the Gr**** -iasis meaning "process" or "morbid condition". A calculus (plural calculi) is a hard, stone-like concretion that forms within an...
- e^{ix}=\cos x+i\sin x,} where e is the base of the natural logarithm, i is the imaginary unit, and cos and sin are the trigonometric functions cosine and sine...
- of the terms into real and imaginary parts is justified by the absolute convergence of the series. The real and imaginary parts of the above expression...
- rational. Imaginary numbers: Numbers that equal the product of a real number and the square root of −1. The number 0 is both real and imaginary. Complex...
- most commonly measured in degrees. When using trigonometric function in calculus, their argument is generally not an angle, but rather a real number. In...
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