Definition of Horizon. Meaning of Horizon. Synonyms of Horizon

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Horizon. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Horizon and, of course, Horizon synonyms and on the right images related to the word Horizon.

Definition of Horizon

No result for Horizon. Showing similar results...

Apparent horizon
Apparent Ap*par"ent, a. [F. apparent, L. apparens, -entis, p. pr. of apparere. See Appear.] 1. Capable of being seen, or easily seen; open to view; visible to the eye; within sight or view. The moon . . . apparent queen. --Milton. 2. Clear or manifest to the understanding; plain; evident; obvious; known; palpable; indubitable. It is apparent foul play. --Shak. 3. Appearing to the eye or mind (distinguished from, but not necessarily opposed to, true or real); seeming; as the apparent motion or diameter of the sun. To live on terms of civility, and even of apparent friendship. --Macaulay. What Berkeley calls visible magnitude was by astronomers called apparent magnitude. --Reid. Apparent horizon, the circle which in a level plain bounds our view, and is formed by the apparent meeting of the earth and heavens, as distinguished from the rational horizon. Apparent time. See Time. Heir apparent (Law), one whose to an estate is indefeasible if he survives the ancestor; -- in distinction from presumptive heir. See Presumptive. Syn: Visible; distinct; plain; obvious; clear; certain; evident; manifest; indubitable; notorious.
Artificial horizon
Artificial Ar`ti*fi"cial, a. [L. artificialis, fr. artificium: cf. F. artificiel. See Artifice.] 1. Made or contrived by art; produced or modified by human skill and labor, in opposition to natural; as, artificial heat or light, gems, salts, minerals, fountains, flowers. Artificial strife Lives in these touches, livelier than life. --Shak. 2. Feigned; fictitious; assumed; affected; not genuine. ``Artificial tears.' --Shak. 3. Artful; cunning; crafty. [Obs.] --Shak. 4. Cultivated; not indigenous; not of spontaneous growth; as, artificial grasses. --Gibbon. Artificial arguments (Rhet.), arguments invented by the speaker, in distinction from laws, authorities, and the like, which are called inartificial arguments or proofs. --Johnson. Artificial classification (Science), an arrangement based on superficial characters, and not expressing the true natural relations species; as, ``the artificial system' in botany, which is the same as the Linn[ae]an system. Artificial horizon. See under Horizon. Artificial light, any light other than that which proceeds from the heavenly bodies. Artificial lines, lines on a sector or scale, so contrived as to represent the logarithmic sines and tangents, which, by the help of the line of numbers, solve, with tolerable exactness, questions in trigonometry, navigation, etc. Artificial numbers, logarithms. Artificial person (Law). See under Person. Artificial sines, tangents, etc., the same as logarithms of the natural sines, tangents, etc. --Hutton.
Dip of the horizon
Dip Dip, n. 1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. ``The dip of oars in unison.' --Glover. 2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch. 3. A liquid, as a sauce or gravy, served at table with a ladle or spoon. [Local, U.S.] --Bartlett. 4. A dipped candle. [Colloq.] --Marryat. Dip of the horizon (Astron.), the angular depression of the seen or visible horizon below the true or natural horizon; the angle at the eye of an observer between a horizontal line and a tangent drawn from the eye to the surface of the ocean. Dip of the needle, or Magnetic dip, the angle formed, in a vertical plane, by a freely suspended magnetic needle, or the line of magnetic force, with a horizontal line; -- called also inclination. Dip of a stratum (Geol.), its greatest angle of inclination to the horizon, or that of a line perpendicular to its direction or strike; -- called also the pitch.
equator ecliptic horizon
Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa.
horizontal fault
Fault Fault, n. 1. (Elec.) A defective point in an electric circuit due to a crossing of the parts of the conductor, or to contact with another conductor or the earth, or to a break in the circuit. 2. (Geol. & Mining) A dislocation caused by a slipping of rock masses along a plane of facture; also, the dislocated structure resulting from such slipping. Note: The surface along which the dislocated masses have moved is called the fault plane. When this plane is vertical, the fault is a vertical fault; when its inclination is such that the present relative position of the two masses could have been produced by the sliding down, along the fault plane, of the mass on its upper side, the fault is a normal, or gravity, fault. When the fault plane is so inclined that the mass on its upper side has moved up relatively, the fault is then called a reverse (or reversed), thrust, or overthrust, fault. If no vertical displacement has resulted, the fault is then called a horizontal fault. The linear extent of the dislocation measured on the fault plane and in the direction of movement is the displacement; the vertical displacement is the throw; the horizontal displacement is the heave. The direction of the line of intersection of the fault plane with a horizontal plane is the trend of the fault. A fault is a strike fault when its trend coincides approximately with the strike of associated strata (i.e., the line of intersection of the plane of the strata with a horizontal plane); it is a dip fault when its trend is at right angles to the strike; an oblique fault when its trend is oblique to the strike. Oblique faults and dip faults are sometimes called cross faults. A series of closely associated parallel faults are sometimes called step faults and sometimes distributive faults.
Horizontal training
Training Train"ing, n. The act of one who trains; the act or process of exercising, disciplining, etc.; education. Fan training (Hort.), the operation of training fruit trees, grapevines, etc., so that the branches shall radiate from the stem like a fan. Horizontal training (Hort.), the operation of training fruit trees, grapevines, etc., so that the branches shall spread out laterally in a horizontal direction. Training college. See Normal school, under Normal, a. Training day, a day on which a military company assembles for drill or parade. [U. S.] Training ship, a vessel on board of which boys are trained as sailors. Syn: See Education.
Horizontally
Horizontally Hor`i*zon"tal*ly, adv. In a horizontal direction or position; on a level; as, moving horizontally.
Plano-horizontal
Plano-horizontal Pla"no-hor`i*zon"tal, a. [Plano- + horizontal.] Having a level horizontal surface or position. --Lee.
Quicksilver horizon
Quicksilver Quick"sil`ver, n. [Quick living + silver; -- so called from its fluidity; cf. G. quecksilber, L. argentum vivum. See Quick, a.] (Chem.) The metal mercury; -- so called from its resemblance to liquid silver. Quicksilver horizon, a mercurial artificial horizon. See under Horizon. Quicksilver water, a solution of mercury nitrate used in artificial silvering; quick water.
Rational horizon
Rational Ra"tion*al, a. [L. rationalis: cf. F. rationnel. See Ratio, Reason, and cf. Rationale.] 1. Relating to reason; not physical; mental. Moral philosophy was his chiefest end; for the rational, the natural, and mathematics . . . were but simple pastimes in comparison of the other. --Sir T. North. 2. Having reason, or the faculty of reasoning; endowed with reason or understanding; reasoning. It is our glory and happiness to have a rational nature. --Law. 3. Agreeable to reason; not absurd, preposterous, extravagant, foolish, fanciful, or the like; wise; judicious; as, rational conduct; a rational man. 4. (Chem.) Expressing the type, structure, relations, and reactions of a compound; graphic; -- said of formul[ae]. See under Formula. Rational horizon. (Astron.) See Horizon, 2 (b) . Rational quantity (Alg.), one that can be expressed without the use of a radical sign, or in extract parts of unity; -- opposed to irrational or radical quantity. Rational symptom (Med.), one elicited by the statements of the patient himself and not as the result of a physical examination.
Sensible horizon
Sensible Sen"si*ble, a. [F., fr. L. sensibilis, fr. sensus sense.] 1. Capable of being perceived by the senses; apprehensible through the bodily organs; hence, also, perceptible to the mind; making an impression upon the sense, reason, or understanding; ?????? heat; sensible resistance. Air is sensible to the touch by its motion. --Arbuthnot. The disgrace was more sensible than the pain. --Sir W. Temple. Any very sensible effect upon the prices of things. --A. Smith. 2. Having the capacity of receiving impressions from external objects; capable of perceiving by the instrumentality of the proper organs; liable to be affected physsically or mentally; impressible. Would your cambric were sensible as your finger. --Shak. 3. Hence: Liable to impression from without; easily affected; having nice perception or acute feeling; sensitive; also, readily moved or affected by natural agents; delicate; as, a sensible thermometer. ``With affection wondrous sensible.' --Shak. 4. Perceiving or having perception, either by the senses or the mind; cognizant; perceiving so clearly as to be convinced; satisfied; persuaded. He [man] can not think at any time, waking or sleeping, without being sensible of it. --Locke. They are now sensible it would have been better to comply than to refuse. --Addison. 5. Having moral perception; capable of being affected by moral good or evil. 6. Possessing or containing sense or reason; giftedwith, or characterized by, good or common sense; intelligent; wise. Now a sensible man, by and by a fool. --Shak. Sensible note or tone (Mus.), the major seventh note of any scale; -- so called because, being but a half step below the octave, or key tone, and naturally leading up to that, it makes the ear sensible of its approaching sound. Called also the leading tone. Sensible horizon. See Horizon, n., 2. (a) . Syn: Intelligent; wise. Usage: Sensible, Intelligent. We call a man sensible whose judgments and conduct are marked and governed by sound judgment or good common semse. We call one intelligent who is quick and clear in his understanding, i. e., who discriminates readily and nicely in respect to difficult and important distinction. The sphere of the sensible man lies in matters of practical concern; of the intelligent man, in subjects of intellectual interest. ``I have been tired with accounts from sensible men, furnished with matters of fact which have happened within their own knowledge.' --Addison. ``Trace out numerous footsteps . . . of a most wise and intelligent architect throughout all this stupendous fabric.' --Woodward.
Visible horizon
Visible Vis"i*ble, a. [L. visibilis, fr. videre, visum, to see: cf. F. visible. See Vision.] 1. Perceivable by the eye; capable of being seen; perceptible; in view; as, a visible star; the least spot is visible on white paper. Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible. --Bk. of Com. Prayer. Virtue made visible in outward grace. --Young. 2. Noticeable; apparent; open; conspicuous. --Shak. The factions at court were greater, or more visible, than before. --Clarendon. Visible church (Theol.), the apparent church of Christ on earth; the whole body of professed believers in Christ, as contradistinguished from the invisible, or real, church, consisting of sanctified persons. Visible horizon. Same as Apparent horizon, under Apparent. -- Vis"i*ble*ness, n. -- Vis"i*bly, adv.

Meaning of Horizon from wikipedia

- The horizon or skyline is the apparent line that separates earth from sky, the line that divides all visible directions into two categories: those that...
- astrophysics, an event horizon is a boundary beyond which events cannot affect an observer on the opposite side of it. An event horizon is most commonly ****ociated...
- Deepwater Horizon was an ultra-deepwater, dynamically positioned, semi-submersible offs**** drilling rig owned by Transocean. Built in 2001 in South Korea...
- Duric horizon Ferralic horizon Ferric horizon Folic horizon Fragic horizon Fulvic horizon Gypsic horizon Histic horizon Hortic horizon Hydragric horizon Irragric...
- Horizon Zero Dawn is an action role-playing game developed by Guerrilla Games and published by Sony Interactive Entertainment. It was released for the...
- Event Horizon is a 1997 science fiction horror film directed by Paul W. S. Anderson and written by Philip Eisner. It stars Laurence Fishburne, Sam Neill...
- Forza Horizon 4 is an open world racing video game developed by Playground Games and published by Microsoft Studios. It was released on 2 October 2018...
- The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (also referred to as the BP oil spill, oil leak, or oil disaster; the Gulf of Mexico oil spill; and the Macondo blowout)...
- professional-style track racing events and series, and the open world-styled Forza Horizon series mainly developed by British developer Playground Games, which revolves...
- Bring Me the Horizon (often abbreviated as BMTH) are an English rock band formed in Sheffield in 2004. The group consists of lead vocalist Oliver Sykes...
Loading...