Definition of Genes. Meaning of Genes. Synonyms of Genes

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Definition of Genes

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Agenesic
Agenesic Ag`e*nes"ic, a. [See Agensis.] (Physiol.) Characterized by sterility; infecund.
Amphigenesis
Amphigenesis Am`phi*gen"e*sis, n. [Gr. ? + ? generation.] (Biol.) Sexual generation; amphigony.
Amylogenesis
Amylogenesis Am`y*lo*gen"e*sis, n. [Amylum + genesis.] The formation of starch.
Autogenesis
Autogenesis Au`to*gen"e*sis, n. [Auto- + genesis.] (Biol.) Spontaneous generation.
Biogenesis
Biogenesis Bi`o*gen"e*sis, Biogeny Bi*og"e*ny, n. [Gr. ? life + ?, ?, birth.] (Biol.) (a) A doctrine that the genesis or production of living organisms can take place only through the agency of living germs or parents; -- opposed to abiogenesis. (b) Life development generally.
Blastogenesis
Blastogenesis Blas`to*gen"e*sis, n. [Gr. blasto`s sprout + E. genesis.] (Biol.) Multiplication or increase by gemmation or budding.
Budgeness
Budgeness Budge"ness, n. Sternness; severity. [Obs.] A Sara for goodness, a great Bellona for budgeness. --Stanyhurst.
caenogenesis
Kenogenesis Ken`o*gen"e*sis, n. [Gr. ? new + E. genesis.] (Biol.) Modified evolution, in which nonprimitive characters make their appearance in consequence of a secondary adaptation of the embryo to the peculiar conditions of its environment; -- distinguished from palingenesis. [Written also c[ae]nogenesis.]
cell genesis
Cell Cell, n. [OF. celle, fr. L. cella; akin to celare to hide, and E. hell, helm, conceal. Cf. Hall.] 1. A very small and close apartment, as in a prison or in a monastery or convent; the hut of a hermit. The heroic confessor in his cell. --Macaulay. 2. A small religious house attached to a monastery or convent. ``Cells or dependent priories.' --Milman. 3. Any small cavity, or hollow place. 4. (Arch.) (a) The space between the ribs of a vaulted roof. (b) Same as Cella. 5. (Elec.) A jar of vessel, or a division of a compound vessel, for holding the exciting fluid of a battery. 6. (Biol.) One of the minute elementary structures, of which the greater part of the various tissues and organs of animals and plants are composed. Note: All cells have their origin in the primary cell from which the organism was developed. In the lowest animal and vegetable forms, one single cell constitutes the complete individual, such being called unicelluter orgamisms. A typical cell is composed of a semifluid mass of protoplasm, more or less granular, generally containing in its center a nucleus which in turn frequently contains one or more nucleoli, the whole being surrounded by a thin membrane, the cell wall. In some cells, as in those of blood, in the am[oe]ba, and in embryonic cells (both vegetable and animal), there is no restricting cell wall, while in some of the unicelluliar organisms the nucleus is wholly wanting. See Illust. of Bipolar. Air cell. See Air cell. Cell development (called also cell genesis, cell formation, and cytogenesis), the multiplication, of cells by a process of reproduction under the following common forms; segmentation or fission, gemmation or budding, karyokinesis, and endogenous multiplication. See Segmentation, Gemmation, etc. Cell theory. (Biol.) See Cellular theory, under Cellular.
Chiogenes hispidula
Creeping Creep"ing, a. 1. Crawling, or moving close to the ground. ``Every creeping thing.' --Gen. vi. 20. 2. Growing along, and clinging to, the ground, or to a wall, etc., by means of rootlets or tendrils. Casements lined with creeping herbs. --Cowper. Ceeping crowfoot (Bot.), a plant, the Ranunculus repens. Creeping snowberry, an American plant (Chiogenes hispidula) with white berries and very small round leaves having the flavor of wintergreen.
Chondrogenesis
Chondrogenesis Chon`dro*gen"e*sis, n. [Gr. ? cartilage + genesis.] (Physiol.) The development of cartilage.
cytogenesis
Cell Cell, n. [OF. celle, fr. L. cella; akin to celare to hide, and E. hell, helm, conceal. Cf. Hall.] 1. A very small and close apartment, as in a prison or in a monastery or convent; the hut of a hermit. The heroic confessor in his cell. --Macaulay. 2. A small religious house attached to a monastery or convent. ``Cells or dependent priories.' --Milman. 3. Any small cavity, or hollow place. 4. (Arch.) (a) The space between the ribs of a vaulted roof. (b) Same as Cella. 5. (Elec.) A jar of vessel, or a division of a compound vessel, for holding the exciting fluid of a battery. 6. (Biol.) One of the minute elementary structures, of which the greater part of the various tissues and organs of animals and plants are composed. Note: All cells have their origin in the primary cell from which the organism was developed. In the lowest animal and vegetable forms, one single cell constitutes the complete individual, such being called unicelluter orgamisms. A typical cell is composed of a semifluid mass of protoplasm, more or less granular, generally containing in its center a nucleus which in turn frequently contains one or more nucleoli, the whole being surrounded by a thin membrane, the cell wall. In some cells, as in those of blood, in the am[oe]ba, and in embryonic cells (both vegetable and animal), there is no restricting cell wall, while in some of the unicelluliar organisms the nucleus is wholly wanting. See Illust. of Bipolar. Air cell. See Air cell. Cell development (called also cell genesis, cell formation, and cytogenesis), the multiplication, of cells by a process of reproduction under the following common forms; segmentation or fission, gemmation or budding, karyokinesis, and endogenous multiplication. See Segmentation, Gemmation, etc. Cell theory. (Biol.) See Cellular theory, under Cellular.
Cytogenesis
Cytogenesis Cy`to*gen"e*sis (s?`t?-j?n"?-s?s), n. [Gr. ???? hollow vessel + E. genesis.] (Biol.) Development of cells in animal and vegetable organisms. See Gemmation, Budding, Karyokinesis; also Cell development, under Cell.
Digenesis
Digenesis Di*gen"e*sis, n. [Pref. di- + genesis.] (Biol.) The faculty of multiplying in two ways; -- by ova fecundated by spermatic fluid, and asexually, as by buds. See Parthenogenesis.
Dysgenesic
Dysgenesic Dys`ge*nes"ic, a. Not procreating or breeding freely; as, one race may be dysgenesic with respect to another. --Darwin.
Dysgenesis
Dysgenesis Dys*gen"e*sis, n. [Pref. dys- + genesis.] (Biol.) A condition of not generating or breeding freely; infertility; a form homogenesis in which the hybrids are sterile among themselves, but are fertile with members of either parent race.
Electrogenesis
Electrogenesis E*lec`tro*gen"e*sis, n. [Electro- + genesis.] (Physiol.) Same as Electrogeny.
Elengeness
Elengeness El"enge*ness, n. Loneliness; misery. [Obs.]
Ellengeness
Ellenge El"lenge, Ellinge El"linge, a., Ellengeness El"lenge*ness, Ellingeness El"linge*ness, n. See Elenge, Elengeness. [Obs.]
Ellingeness
Ellenge El"lenge, Ellinge El"linge, a., Ellengeness El"lenge*ness, Ellingeness El"linge*ness, n. See Elenge, Elengeness. [Obs.]
Endogenesis
Endogenesis En`do*gen"e*sis, n. [Endo- + genesis.] (Biol.) Endogeny.
Epigenesis
Epigenesis Ep`i*gen"e*sis, n. [Pref. epi- + genesis.] (Biol.) The theory of generation which holds that the germ is created entirely new, not merely expanded, by the procreative power of the parents. It is opposed to the theory of evolution, also to syngenesis.
Epigenesist
Epigenesist Ep`i*gen"e*sist, n. (Biol.) One who believes in, or advocates the theory of, epigenesis.
Eugenesis
Eugenesis Eu*gen"e*sis, n. [Pref. eu- + genesis.] (Biol.) The quality or condition of having strong reproductive powers; generation with full fertility between different species or races, specif. between hybrids of the first generation.
Gamogenesis
Gamogenesis Gam`o*gen"e*sis, n. [Gr. ? marriage + E. genesis.] (Biol.) The production of offspring by the union of parents of different sexes; sexual reproduction; -- the opposite of agamogenesis.
Geneagenesis
Geneagenesis Gen`e*a*gen"e*sis, n. [Gr. ? race + E. genesis.] (Biol.) Alternate generation. See under Generation.
Genesee epoch
Genesee epoch Gen`e*see" ep"och (Geol.) The closing subdivision of the Hamilton period in the American Devonian system; -- so called because the formations of this period crop out in Genesee, New York.
Genesial
Genesial Ge*ne"sial, a. Of or relating to generation.
Genesiolgy
Genesiolgy Ge*ne`si*ol"gy, n. [Gr. ? birth + -logy.] The doctrine or science of generation.
Glucogenesis
Glucogenesis Glu`co*gen"e*sis, n. Glycogenesis. [R.]

Meaning of Genes from wikipedia

- "having a gene" (e.g., "good genes," "hair colour gene") typically refers to containing a different allele of the same, shared gene. Genes evolve due...
- Gênes [ʒɛn] was a department of the French Consulate and of the First French Empire in present-day Italy. It was named after the city of Genoa. It was...
- non-protein coding genes such as transfer RNA (tRNA) or small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes, the product is a functional RNA. The process of gene expression is...
- protein-coding genes improved, the count of recognized protein-coding genes dropped to 19,000-20,000. However, a fuller understanding of the role pla**** by genes expressing...
- The halloween genes are a set of genes identified in Drosophila melanogaster that influence embryonic development. All of the genes code for cytochrome...
- De novo gene birth is the process by which new genes evolve from DNA sequences that were ancestrally non-genic. De novo genes represent a subset of novel...
- cl****es are the NBS-LRR genes and the cell surface pattern recognition receptors (PRR). The protein products of the NBS-LRR R genes contain a nucleotide...
- the mitochondrial genome. Human genomes include both protein-coding DNA genes and noncoding DNA. Haploid human genomes, which are contained in germ cells...
- 26 episodes and Genes (season 2) started from Sa****ay 17 October 2015 at 8PM IST with new anchor Roja.This show is remake of Genes which is aired on...
- Gener may refer to: People: Tania Gener (born 1988), Spanish artistic gymnast Juan Guitéras y Gener (1852–1925), Cuban physician and pathologist Gener...
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