Definition of Frankish. Meaning of Frankish. Synonyms of Frankish

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Frankish. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Frankish and, of course, Frankish synonyms and on the right images related to the word Frankish.

Definition of Frankish

Frankish
Frankish Frank"ish, a. Like, or pertaining to, the Franks.

Meaning of Frankish from wikipedia

- Francia, also called the Kingdom of the Franks (Latin: Regnum Francorum), or Frankish Empire, was the largest post-Roman barbarian kingdom in Western Europe...
- later Frankish rulers were given recognition by the Catholic Church as successors to the old rulers of the Western Roman Empire. Although the Frankish name...
- Frankish may refer to: Franks, a Germanic tribe and their culture Frankish language or its modern descendants, Franconian languages Francia Crusaders Levantines...
- Frankish (reconstructed Frankish: *Frenkisk), also known as Old Franconian or Old Frankish, was the West Germanic language spoken by the Franks between...
- symbolised eternal life (cicadas) or longevity (the bees of Artemis). Frankish mythology comprises the mythology of the Germanic tribal confederation...
- fall of the Western Roman Empire three centuries earlier. The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian Empire. He was...
- Kevin Frankish (born March 4, 1964) is a Canadian television presenter and media personality. He co-hosted Breakfast Television Toronto on Citytv Toronto...
- contemporary East Frankish Annales Fuldenses describes the kingdom being "divided in three" and Louis "acceding to the eastern part". The West Frankish Annales...
- despite superficial similarity. The name Gaul is derived from the Old Frankish *Walholant (via a Latinized form *Walula) literally "Land of the Foreigners/Romans"...
- rule) to that of a monarchy tied to a specific territory. A timeline of Frankish rulers is difficult since the realm was, according to old Germanic practice...
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