Definition of Falco. Meaning of Falco. Synonyms of Falco

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Definition of Falco

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Catafalco
Catafalco Cat`a*fal"co, n. [It.] See Catafalque.
Chanting falcon
Falcon Fal"con, n. [OE. faucon, faucoun, OF. faucon, falcon, ?. faucon, fr. LL. falco, perh. from L. falx, falcis, a sickle or scythe, and named from its curving talons. Cf. Falchion.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) (a) One of a family (Falconid[ae]) of raptorial birds, characterized by a short, hooked beak, strong claws, and powerful flight. (b) Any species of the genus Falco, distinguished by having a toothlike lobe on the upper mandible; especially, one of this genus trained to the pursuit of other birds, or game. In the language of falconry, the female peregrine (Falco peregrinus) is exclusively called the falcon. --Yarrell. 2. (Gun.) An ancient form of cannon. Chanting falcon. (Zo["o]l.) See under Chanting.
Chanting falcon
Chanting Chant"ing (ch[.a]nt"[i^]ng), n. Singing, esp. as a chant is sung. Chanting falcon (Zo["o]l.), an African falcon (Melierax canorus or musicus). The male has the habit, remarkable in a bird of prey, of singing to his mate, while she is incubating.
Cuckoo falcon
Cuckoo Cuck"oo (k??k"??), n. [OE. coccou, cukkow, F. coucou, prob. of imitative origin; cf. L. cuculus, Gr. ????, Skr. k?ki?a, G. kuckuk, D. koekoek.] (Zo["o]l.) A bird belonging to Cuculus, Coccyzus, and several allied genera, of many species. Note: The European cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) builds no nest of its own, but lays its eggs in the nests of other birds, to be hatched by them. The American yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus Americanus) and the black-billed cuckoo (C. erythrophthalmus) build their own nests. Cuckoo bee (Zool.), a bee, parasitic in the larval stage in the nests of other bees, feeding either upon their food or larvae. They belong to the genera Nomada, Melecta, Epeolus, and others. Cuckoo clock, a clock so constructed that at the time for striking it gives forth sounds resembling the cry of the cuckoo. Cuckoo dove (Zo["o]l.), a long-tailed pigeon of the genus Macropygia. Many species inhabit the East Indies. Cuckoo fish (Zo["o]l.), the European red gurnard (Trigla cuculus). The name probably alludes to the sound that it utters. Cuckoo falcon (Zo["o]l.), any falcon of the genus Baza. The genus inhabits Africa and the East Indies. Cuckoo maid (Zo["o]l.), the wryneck; -- called also cuckoo mate. Cuckoo ray (Zo["o]l.), a British ray (Raia miraletus). Cuckoo spit, or Cuckoo spittle. (a) A frothy secretion found upon plants, exuded by the larvae of certain insects, for concealment; -- called also toad spittle and frog spit. (b) (Zo["o]l.) A small hemipterous insect, the larva of which, living on grass and the leaves of plants, exudes this secretion. The insects belong to Aphrophora, Helochara, and allied genera. Ground cuckoo, the chaparral cock.
Falco alaudarius
Kestrel Kes"trel (k[e^]s"tr[e^]l), n. [See Castrel.] (Zo["o]l.) A small, slender European hawk (Falco alaudarius), allied to the sparrow hawk. Its color is reddish fawn, streaked and spotted with white and black. Also called windhover and stannel. The name is also applied to other allied species. Note: This word is often used in contempt, as of a mean kind of hawk. ``Kites and kestrels have a resemblance with hawks.' --Bacon.
Falco columbarius
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
Falco jugger
Lugger Lug"ger, n. (Zo["o]l.) An Indian falcon (Falco jugger), similar to the European lanner and the American prairie falcon.
Falco lanarius
Lanner Lan"ner, n. f. Lanneret Lan"ner*et, n. m.[F. lanier, OF. also, lasnier. Cf. Lanyard.] (Zo["o]l.) A long-tailed falcon (Falco lanarius), of Southern Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa, resembling the American prairie falcon.
Falco Mexicanus
Prairie Prai"rie, n. [F., an extensive meadow, OF. praerie, LL. prataria, fr. L. pratum a meadow.] 1. An extensive tract of level or rolling land, destitute of trees, covered with coarse grass, and usually characterized by a deep, fertile soil. They abound throughout the Mississippi valley, between the Alleghanies and the Rocky mountains. From the forests and the prairies, From the great lakes of the northland. --Longfellow. 2. A meadow or tract of grass; especially, a so called natural meadow. Prairie chicken (Zo["o]l.), any American grouse of the genus Tympanuchus, especially T. Americanus (formerly T. cupido), which inhabits the prairies of the central United States. Applied also to the sharp-tailed grouse. Prairie clover (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Petalostemon, having small rosy or white flowers in dense terminal heads or spikes. Several species occur in the prairies of the United States. Prairie dock (Bot.), a coarse composite plant (Silphium terebinthaceum) with large rough leaves and yellow flowers, found in the Western prairies. Prairie dog (Zo["o]l.), a small American rodent (Cynomys Ludovicianus) allied to the marmots. It inhabits the plains west of the Mississippi. The prairie dogs burrow in the ground in large warrens, and have a sharp bark like that of a dog. Called also prairie marmot. Prairie grouse. Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie hare (Zo["o]l.), a large long-eared Western hare (Lepus campestris). See Jack rabbit, under 2d Jack. Prairie hawk, Prairie falcon (Zo["o]l.), a falcon of Western North America (Falco Mexicanus). The upper parts are brown. The tail has transverse bands of white; the under parts, longitudinal streaks and spots of brown. Prairie hen. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie itch (Med.), an affection of the skin attended with intense itching, which is observed in the Northern and Western United States; -- also called swamp itch, winter itch. Prairie marmot. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie dog, above. Prairie mole (Zo["o]l.), a large American mole (Scalops argentatus), native of the Western prairies. Prairie pigeon, plover, or snipe (Zo["o]l.), the upland plover. See Plover, n., 2. Prairie rattlesnake (Zo["o]l.), the massasauga. Prairie snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless American snake (Masticophis flavigularis). It is pale yellow, tinged with brown above. Prairie squirrel (Zo["o]l.), any American ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus, inhabiting prairies; -- called also gopher. Prairie turnip (Bot.), the edible turnip-shaped farinaceous root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta) of the Upper Missouri region; also, the plant itself. Called also pomme blanche, and pomme de prairie. Prairie warbler (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored American warbler (Dendroica discolor). The back is olive yellow, with a group of reddish spots in the middle; the under parts and the parts around the eyes are bright yellow; the sides of the throat and spots along the sides, black; three outer tail feathers partly white. Prairie wolf. (Zo["o]l.) See Coyote.
Falco peregrinus
Peregrine Per"e*grine, a. [L. peregrinus. See Pilgrim.] Foreign; not native; extrinsic or from without; exotic. [Spelt also pelegrine.] ``Peregrine and preternatural heat.' --Bacon. Peregrine falcon (Zo["o]l.), a courageous and swift falcon (Falco peregrinus), remarkable for its wide distribution over all the continents. The adult plumage is dark bluish ash on the back, nearly black on the head and cheeks, white beneath, barred with black below the throat. Called also peregrine hawk, duck hawk, game hawk, and great-footed hawk.
Falco peregrinus
Falcon Fal"con, n. [OE. faucon, faucoun, OF. faucon, falcon, ?. faucon, fr. LL. falco, perh. from L. falx, falcis, a sickle or scythe, and named from its curving talons. Cf. Falchion.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) (a) One of a family (Falconid[ae]) of raptorial birds, characterized by a short, hooked beak, strong claws, and powerful flight. (b) Any species of the genus Falco, distinguished by having a toothlike lobe on the upper mandible; especially, one of this genus trained to the pursuit of other birds, or game. In the language of falconry, the female peregrine (Falco peregrinus) is exclusively called the falcon. --Yarrell. 2. (Gun.) An ancient form of cannon. Chanting falcon. (Zo["o]l.) See under Chanting.
Falco pregrinator
Shahin Sha*hin", n. [Ar. sh[=a]h[=i]n.] (Zo["o]l.) A large and swift Asiatic falcon (Falco pregrinator) highly valued in falconry.
Falco rusticolus
Gyrfalcon Gyr"fal`con, n. [OE. gerfaucon, OF. gerfaucon, LL. gyrofalco, perh. fr. L. gyrus circle + falco falcon, and named from its circling flight; or cf. E. gier-eagle. See Gyre, n., Falcon.] (Zo["o]l.) One of several species and varieties of large Arctic falcons, esp. Falco rusticolus and the white species F. Islandicus, both of which are circumpolar. The black and the gray are varieties of the former. See Illust. of Accipiter. [Written also gerfalcon, gierfalcon, and jerfalcon.]
Falco sacer
Saker Sa"ker (s[=a]"k[~e]r), n. [F. sacre (cf. It. sagro, Sp. & Pg. sacre), either fr. L. sacer sacred, holy, as a translation of Gr. "ie`rax falcon, from "iero`s holy, or more probably from Ar. [,c]aqr hawk.] [Written also sacar, sacre.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A falcon (Falco sacer) native of Southern Europe and Asia, closely resembling the lanner. Note: The female is called chargh, and the male charghela, or sakeret. (b) The peregrine falcon. [Prov. Eng.] 2. (Mil.) A small piece of artillery. --Wilhelm. On the bastions were planted culverins and sakers. --Macaulay. The culverins and sakers showing their deadly muzzles over the rampart. --Hawthorne.
Falco sparverius
Sparrow Spar"row, n. [OE. sparwe, AS. spearwa; akin to OHG. sparo, G. sperling, Icel. sp["o]rr, Dan. spurv, spurre, Sw. sparf, Goth. sparwa; -- originally, probably, the quiverer or flutterer, and akin to E. spurn. See Spurn, and cf. Spavin.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) One of many species of small singing birds of the family Fringillig[ae], having conical bills, and feeding chiefly on seeds. Many sparrows are called also finches, and buntings. The common sparrow, or house sparrow, of Europe (Passer domesticus) is noted for its familiarity, its voracity, its attachment to its young, and its fecundity. See House sparrow, under House. Note: The following American species are well known; the chipping sparrow, or chippy, the sage sparrow, the savanna sparrow, the song sparrow, the tree sparrow, and the white-throated sparrow (see Peabody bird). See these terms under Sage, Savanna, etc. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several small singing birds somewhat resembling the true sparrows in form or habits, as the European hedge sparrow. See under Hedge. He that doth the ravens feed, Yea, providently caters for the sparrow, Be comfort to my age! --Shak. Field sparrow, Fox sparrow, etc. See under Field, Fox, etc. Sparrow bill, a small nail; a castiron shoe nail; a sparable. Sparrow hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small European hawk (Accipiter nisus) or any of the allied species. (b) A small American falcon (Falco sparverius). (c) The Australian collared sparrow hawk (Accipiter torquatus). Note: The name is applied to other small hawks, as the European kestrel and the New Zealand quail hawk. Sparrow owl (Zo["o]l.), a small owl (Glaucidium passerinum) found both in the Old World and the New. The name is also applied to other species of small owls. Sparrow spear (Zo["o]l.), the female of the reed bunting. [Prov. Eng.]
Falcon
Falcon Fal"con, n. [OE. faucon, faucoun, OF. faucon, falcon, ?. faucon, fr. LL. falco, perh. from L. falx, falcis, a sickle or scythe, and named from its curving talons. Cf. Falchion.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) (a) One of a family (Falconid[ae]) of raptorial birds, characterized by a short, hooked beak, strong claws, and powerful flight. (b) Any species of the genus Falco, distinguished by having a toothlike lobe on the upper mandible; especially, one of this genus trained to the pursuit of other birds, or game. In the language of falconry, the female peregrine (Falco peregrinus) is exclusively called the falcon. --Yarrell. 2. (Gun.) An ancient form of cannon. Chanting falcon. (Zo["o]l.) See under Chanting.
Falconer
Falconer Fal"con*er, n. [OE. fauconer, OF. falconier, fauconier, F. fauconnier. See Falcon.] A person who breeds or trains hawks for taking birds or game; one who follows the sport of fowling with hawks. --Johnson.
Falconet
Falconet Fal"co*net, n. [Dim. of falcon: cf. F. fauconneau, LL. falconeta, properly, a young falcon.] 1. One of the smaller cannon used in the 15th century and later. 2. (Zo["o]l.) (a) One of several very small Asiatic falcons of the genus Microhierax. (b) One of a group of Australian birds of the genus Falcunculus, resembling shrikes and titmice.
Falcongentil
Falcongentil Fal"con*gen`til, n. [F. faucon-gentil. See Falcon, and Genteel.] (Zo["o]l.) The female or young of the goshawk (Astur palumbarius).
Falconine
Falconine Fal"co*nine, a. (Zo["o]l.) Like a falcon or hawk; belonging to the Falconid[ae]
Falconry
Falconry Fal"con*ry, n. [Cf. F. fauconnerie. See Falcon.] 1. The art of training falcons or hawks to pursue and attack wild fowl or game. 2. The sport of taking wild fowl or game by means of falcons or hawks.
Finch falcon
Finch Finch, n.; pl. Fishes. [AS. finc; akin to D. vink, OHG. fincho, G. fink; cf. W. pinc a finch; also E. spink.] (Zo["o]l.) A small singing bird of many genera and species, belonging to the family Fringillid[ae]. Note: The word is often used in composition, as in chaffinch, goldfinch, grassfinch, pinefinch, etc. Bramble finch. See Brambling. Canary finch, the canary bird. Copper finch. See Chaffinch. Diamond finch. See under Diamond. Finch falcon (Zo["o]l.), one of several very small East Indian falcons of the genus Hierax. To pull a finch, to swindle an ignorant or unsuspecting person. [Obs.] ``Privily a finch eke could he pull.' --Chaucer.
Gentile-falcon
Gentile-falcon Gen"tile-fal`con, n. (Zo["o]l.) See Falcon-gentil.
Gerfalcon
Gerfalcon Ger"fal`con, n. (Zo["o]l.) See Gyrfalcon.
gerfalcon
Gyrfalcon Gyr"fal`con, n. [OE. gerfaucon, OF. gerfaucon, LL. gyrofalco, perh. fr. L. gyrus circle + falco falcon, and named from its circling flight; or cf. E. gier-eagle. See Gyre, n., Falcon.] (Zo["o]l.) One of several species and varieties of large Arctic falcons, esp. Falco rusticolus and the white species F. Islandicus, both of which are circumpolar. The black and the gray are varieties of the former. See Illust. of Accipiter. [Written also gerfalcon, gierfalcon, and jerfalcon.]
Gier-falcon
Gier-falcon Gier"-fal`con, n. [Cf. Gier-eagle, Gyrfalcon.] (Zo["o]l.) The gyrfalcon.
gierfalcon
Gyrfalcon Gyr"fal`con, n. [OE. gerfaucon, OF. gerfaucon, LL. gyrofalco, perh. fr. L. gyrus circle + falco falcon, and named from its circling flight; or cf. E. gier-eagle. See Gyre, n., Falcon.] (Zo["o]l.) One of several species and varieties of large Arctic falcons, esp. Falco rusticolus and the white species F. Islandicus, both of which are circumpolar. The black and the gray are varieties of the former. See Illust. of Accipiter. [Written also gerfalcon, gierfalcon, and jerfalcon.]
Gray falcon
Gray Gray, a. [Compar. Grayer; superl. Grayest.] [OE. gray, grey, AS. gr[=ae]g, gr[=e]g; akin to D. graauw, OHG. gr[=a]o, G. grau, Dan. graa, Sw. gr[*a], Icel. gr[=a]r.] [Written also grey.] 1. White mixed with black, as the color of pepper and salt, or of ashes, or of hair whitened by age; sometimes, a dark mixed color; as, the soft gray eye of a dove. These gray and dun colors may be also produced by mixing whites and blacks. --Sir I. Newton. 2. Gray-haired; gray-headed; of a gray color; hoary. 3. Old; mature; as, gray experience. Ames. Gray antimony (Min.), stibnite. Gray buck (Zo["o]l.), the chickara. Gray cobalt (Min.), smaltite. Gray copper (Min.), tetrahedrite. Gray duck (Zo["o]l.), the gadwall; also applied to the female mallard. Gray falcon (Zo["o]l.) the peregrine falcon. Gray Friar. See Franciscan, and Friar. Gray hen (Zo["o]l.), the female of the blackcock or black grouse. See Heath grouse. Gray mill or millet (Bot.), a name of several plants of the genus Lithospermum; gromwell. Gray mullet (Zo["o]l.) any one of the numerous species of the genus Mugil, or family Mugilid[ae], found both in the Old World and America; as the European species (M. capito, and M. auratus), the American striped mullet (M. albula), and the white or silver mullet (M. Braziliensis). See Mullet. Gray owl (Zo["o]l.), the European tawny or brown owl (Syrnium aluco). The great gray owl (Ulula cinerea) inhabits arctic America. Gray parrot (Zo["o]l.), a parrot (Psittacus erithacus), very commonly domesticated, and noted for its aptness in learning to talk. Gray pike. (Zo["o]l.) See Sauger. Gray snapper (Zo["o]l.), a Florida fish; the sea lawyer. See Snapper. Gray snipe (Zo["o]l.), the dowitcher in winter plumage. Gray whale (Zo["o]l.), a rather large and swift California whale (Rhachianectes glaucus), formerly taken in large numbers in the bays; -- called also grayback, devilfish, and hardhead.
Gyrfalcon
Gyrfalcon Gyr"fal`con, n. [OE. gerfaucon, OF. gerfaucon, LL. gyrofalco, perh. fr. L. gyrus circle + falco falcon, and named from its circling flight; or cf. E. gier-eagle. See Gyre, n., Falcon.] (Zo["o]l.) One of several species and varieties of large Arctic falcons, esp. Falco rusticolus and the white species F. Islandicus, both of which are circumpolar. The black and the gray are varieties of the former. See Illust. of Accipiter. [Written also gerfalcon, gierfalcon, and jerfalcon.]
Jerfalcon
Jerfalcon Jer"fal`con, n. (Zo["o]l.) The gyrfalcon.

Meaning of Falco from wikipedia

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