Definition of Ejectment. Meaning of Ejectment. Synonyms of Ejectment

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Ejectment. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Ejectment and, of course, Ejectment synonyms and on the right images related to the word Ejectment.

Definition of Ejectment

Ejectment
Ejectment E*ject"ment, n. 1. A casting out; a dispossession; an expulsion; ejection; as, the ejectment of tenants from their homes. 2. (Law) A species of mixed action, which lies for the recovery of possession of real property, and damages and costs for the wrongful withholding of it. --Wharton.

Meaning of Ejectment from wikipedia

- until ousted by you, and then brings the action, tresp**** in ejectment or, briefly, ejectment. To succeed in his action he must prove (1) my right to enter...
- Look up ejection or eject in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Ejection or Eject may refer to: Ejection (sports), the act of officially removing someone...
- An ejection fraction (EF) is the volumetric fraction (or portion of the total) of fluid (usually blood) ejected from a chamber (usually the heart) with...
- The Ejected were an English punk rock/Oi! band from Dagenham, London, active mainly between 1981 and 1983. The band was formed by ex-Dawn Patrol members...
- Ejective clicks may be: Ejective-contour clicks, consonants that transition from a click to an ejective sound Ejective oral non-contour glottalized clicks...
- downward ejecting refers to firearms which eject spent cases downward from the firearm's receiver, rather than the more conventional designs which eject the...
- In aircraft, an ejection seat or ejector seat is a system designed to rescue the pilot or other crew of an aircraft (usually military) in an emergency...
- container and eject its content. In model rocketry, ejection charges are used to deploy a recovery system (usually parachute or streamer). The ejection charge...
- and ⟨ ⟩, see IPA § Brackets and transcription delimiters. In phonetics, ejective consonants are usually voiceless consonants that are pronounced with a...
- The Great Ejection followed the Act of Uniformity 1662 in England. Several thousand Puritan ministers were forced out of their positions in the Church...