Definition of Conde. Meaning of Conde. Synonyms of Conde

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Definition of Conde

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Abscondence
Abscondence Ab*scond"ence, n. Fugitive concealment; secret retirement; hiding. [R.] --Phillips.
Absconder
Absconder Ab*scond"er, n. One who absconds.
aldol condensation
Aldol Al"dol, n. [Aldehyde + -ol as in alcohol.] (Chem.) A colorless liquid, C4H8O2, obtained by condensation of two molecules of acetaldehyde: CH3CHO + CH3CHO = H3CH(OH)CH2CO; also, any of various derivatives of this. The same reaction has been applied, under the name of aldol condensation, to the production of many compounds.
Condemnable
Condemnable Con"dem*na"ble, a. [L. condemnabilis.] Worthy of condemnation; blamable; culpable.
Condemnation
Condemnation Con"dem*na"tion, n. [L. condemnatio.] 1. The act of condemning or pronouncing to be wrong; censure; blame; disapprobation. In every other sense of condemnation, as blame, censure, reproof, private judgment, and the like. --Paley. 2. The act of judicially condemning, or adjudging guilty, unfit for use, or forfeited; the act of dooming to punishment or forfeiture. A legal and judicial condemnation. --Paley. Whose condemnation is pronounced. --Shak. 3. The state of being condemned. His pathetic appeal to posterity in the hopeless hour of condemnation. --W. Irving. 4. The ground or reason of condemning. This is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather light, because their deeds were evil. --John iii. 19.
Condemnatory
Condemnatory Con*dem"na*to*ry, a. Condemning; containing or imposing condemnation or censure; as, a condemnatory sentence or decree.
Condemned
Condemned Con*demned", a. 1. Pronounced to be wrong, guilty, worthless, or forfeited; adjudged or sentenced to punishment, destruction, or confiscation. 2. Used for condemned persons. Richard Savage . . . had lain with fifty pounds weight of irons on his legs in the condemned ward of Newgate. --Macaulay.
Condemner
Condemner Con*dem"ner (? or ?), n. One who condemns or censures.
Condensability
Condensability Con*den`sa*bil"i*ty, n. Capability of being condensed.
Condensable
Condensable Con*den"sa*ble, a. [Cf. F. condensable.] Capable of being condensed; as, vapor is condensable.
Condensate
Condensate Con*den"sate, a. [L. condensatus, p. p. of condensare. See Condense, v. t.] Made dense; condensed. Water . . . thickened or condensate. --Peacham.
Condensate
Condensate Con*den"sate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Condensated; p. pr. & vb. n. Condensating.] To condense. [R.] --Hammond.
Condensated
Condensate Con*den"sate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Condensated; p. pr. & vb. n. Condensating.] To condense. [R.] --Hammond.
Condensating
Condensate Con*den"sate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Condensated; p. pr. & vb. n. Condensating.] To condense. [R.] --Hammond.
Condensation
Condensation Con`den*sa"tion, n. [L. condensatio: cf. F. condensation.] 1. The act or process of condensing or of being condensed; the state of being condensed. He [Goldsmith] was a great and perhaps an unequaled master of the arts of selection and condensation. --Macaulay. 2. (Physics) The act or process of reducing, by depression of temperature or increase of pressure, etc., to another and denser form, as gas to the condition of a liquid or steam to water. 3. (Chem.) A rearrangement or concentration of the different constituents of one or more substances into a distinct and definite compound of greater complexity and molecular weight, often resulting in an increase of density, as the condensation of oxygen into ozone, or of acetone into mesitylene. Condensation product (Chem.), a substance obtained by the polymerization of one substance, or by the union of two or more, with or without separation of some unimportant side products. Surface condensation, the system of condensing steam by contact with cold metallic surfaces, in distinction from condensation by the injection of cold water.
Condensation product
Condensation Con`den*sa"tion, n. [L. condensatio: cf. F. condensation.] 1. The act or process of condensing or of being condensed; the state of being condensed. He [Goldsmith] was a great and perhaps an unequaled master of the arts of selection and condensation. --Macaulay. 2. (Physics) The act or process of reducing, by depression of temperature or increase of pressure, etc., to another and denser form, as gas to the condition of a liquid or steam to water. 3. (Chem.) A rearrangement or concentration of the different constituents of one or more substances into a distinct and definite compound of greater complexity and molecular weight, often resulting in an increase of density, as the condensation of oxygen into ozone, or of acetone into mesitylene. Condensation product (Chem.), a substance obtained by the polymerization of one substance, or by the union of two or more, with or without separation of some unimportant side products. Surface condensation, the system of condensing steam by contact with cold metallic surfaces, in distinction from condensation by the injection of cold water.
Condensative
Condensative Con*den"sa*tive, a. [Cf. F. condensatif.] Having the property of condensing.
Condense
Condense Con*dense", v. i. 1. To become more compact; to be reduced into a denser form. Nitrous acid is gaseous at ordinary temperatures, but condenses into a very volatile liquid at the zero of Fahrenheit. --H. Spencer. 2. (Chem.) (a) To combine or unite (as two chemical substances) with or without separation of some unimportant side products. (b) To undergo polymerization.
Condense
Condense Con*dense", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Condensed; p. pr. & vb. n. Condensing.] [L. condensare; con- + densare to make thick or dense, densus thick, dense: cf. F. condenser. See Dense, and cf. Condensate.] 1. To make more close, compact, or dense; to compress or concentrate into a smaller compass; to consolidate; to abridge; to epitomize. In what shape they choose, Dilated or condensed, bright or obscure. --Milton. The secret course pursued at Brussels and at Madrid may be condensed into the usual formula, dissimulation, procrastination, and again dissimulation. --Motley. 2. (Chem. & Physics) To reduce into another and denser form, as by cold or pressure; as, to condense gas into a liquid form, or steam into water. Condensed milk, milk reduced to the consistence of very thick cream by evaporation (usually with addition of sugar) for preservation and transportation. Condensing engine, a steam engine in which the steam is condensed after having exerted its force on the piston. Syn: To compress; contract; crowd; thicken; concentrate; abridge; epitomize; reduce.
Condense
Condense Con*dense", a. [L. condensus.] Condensed; compact; dense. [R.] The huge condense bodies of planets. --Bentley.
Condensed
Condense Con*dense", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Condensed; p. pr. & vb. n. Condensing.] [L. condensare; con- + densare to make thick or dense, densus thick, dense: cf. F. condenser. See Dense, and cf. Condensate.] 1. To make more close, compact, or dense; to compress or concentrate into a smaller compass; to consolidate; to abridge; to epitomize. In what shape they choose, Dilated or condensed, bright or obscure. --Milton. The secret course pursued at Brussels and at Madrid may be condensed into the usual formula, dissimulation, procrastination, and again dissimulation. --Motley. 2. (Chem. & Physics) To reduce into another and denser form, as by cold or pressure; as, to condense gas into a liquid form, or steam into water. Condensed milk, milk reduced to the consistence of very thick cream by evaporation (usually with addition of sugar) for preservation and transportation. Condensing engine, a steam engine in which the steam is condensed after having exerted its force on the piston. Syn: To compress; contract; crowd; thicken; concentrate; abridge; epitomize; reduce.
Condensed milk
Milk Milk, n. [AS. meoluc, meoloc, meolc, milc; akin to OFries. meloc, D. melk, G. milch, OHG. miluh, Icel. mj?ok, Sw. mj["o]lk, Dan. melk, Goth. miluks, G. melken to milk, OHG. melchan, Lith. milszti, L. mulgere, Gr. ?. ????. Cf. Milch, Emulsion, Milt soft roe of fishes.] 1. (Physiol.) A white fluid secreted by the mammary glands of female mammals for the nourishment of their young, consisting of minute globules of fat suspended in a solution of casein, albumin, milk sugar, and inorganic salts. ``White as morne milk.' --Chaucer. 2. (Bot.) A kind of juice or sap, usually white in color, found in certain plants; latex. See Latex. 3. An emulsion made by bruising seeds; as, the milk of almonds, produced by pounding almonds with sugar and water. 4. (Zo["o]l.) The ripe, undischarged spat of an oyster. Condensed milk. See under Condense, v. t. Milk crust (Med.), vesicular eczema occurring on the face and scalp of nursing infants. See Eczema. Milk fever. (a) (Med.) A fever which accompanies or precedes the first lactation. It is usually transitory. (b) (Vet. Surg.) A form puerperal peritonitis in cattle; also, a variety of meningitis occurring in cows after calving. Milk glass, glass having a milky appearance. Milk knot (Med.), a hard lump forming in the breast of a nursing woman, due to obstruction to the flow of milk and congestion of the mammary glands. Milk leg (Med.), a swollen condition of the leg, usually in puerperal women, caused by an inflammation of veins, and characterized by a white appearance occasioned by an accumulation of serum and sometimes of pus in the cellular tissue. Milk meats, food made from milk, as butter and cheese. [Obs.] --Bailey. Milk mirror. Same as Escutcheon, 2. Milk molar (Anat.), one of the deciduous molar teeth which are shed and replaced by the premolars. Milk of lime (Chem.), a watery emulsion of calcium hydrate, produced by macerating quicklime in water. Milk parsley (Bot.), an umbelliferous plant (Peucedanum palustre) of Europe and Asia, having a milky juice. Milk pea (Bot.), a genus (Galactia) of leguminous and, usually, twining plants. Milk sickness (Med.), a peculiar malignant disease, occurring in some parts of the Western United States, and affecting certain kinds of farm stock (esp. cows), and persons who make use of the meat or dairy products of infected cattle. Its chief symptoms in man are uncontrollable vomiting, obstinate constipation, pain, and muscular tremors. Its origin in cattle has been variously ascribed to the presence of certain plants in their food, and to polluted drinking water. Milk snake (Zo["o]l.), a harmless American snake (Ophibolus triangulus, or O. eximius). It is variously marked with white, gray, and red. Called also milk adder, chicken snake, house snake, etc. Milk sugar. (Physiol. Chem.) See Lactose, and Sugar of milk (below). Milk thistle (Bot.), an esculent European thistle (Silybum marianum), having the veins of its leaves of a milky whiteness. Milk thrush. (Med.) See Thrush. Milk tooth (Anat.), one of the temporary first set of teeth in young mammals; in man there are twenty. Milk tree (Bot.), a tree yielding a milky juice, as the cow tree of South America (Brosimum Galactodendron), and the Euphorbia balsamifera of the Canaries, the milk of both of which is wholesome food. Milk vessel (Bot.), a special cell in the inner bark of a plant, or a series of cells, in which the milky juice is contained. See Latex. Rock milk. See Agaric mineral, under Agaric. Sugar of milk. The sugar characteristic of milk; a hard white crystalline slightly sweet substance obtained by evaporation of the whey of milk. It is used in pellets and powder as a vehicle for homeopathic medicines, and as an article of diet. See Lactose.
Condensed milk
Condense Con*dense", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Condensed; p. pr. & vb. n. Condensing.] [L. condensare; con- + densare to make thick or dense, densus thick, dense: cf. F. condenser. See Dense, and cf. Condensate.] 1. To make more close, compact, or dense; to compress or concentrate into a smaller compass; to consolidate; to abridge; to epitomize. In what shape they choose, Dilated or condensed, bright or obscure. --Milton. The secret course pursued at Brussels and at Madrid may be condensed into the usual formula, dissimulation, procrastination, and again dissimulation. --Motley. 2. (Chem. & Physics) To reduce into another and denser form, as by cold or pressure; as, to condense gas into a liquid form, or steam into water. Condensed milk, milk reduced to the consistence of very thick cream by evaporation (usually with addition of sugar) for preservation and transportation. Condensing engine, a steam engine in which the steam is condensed after having exerted its force on the piston. Syn: To compress; contract; crowd; thicken; concentrate; abridge; epitomize; reduce.
Condenser
Condenser Con*dens"er, n. 1. One who, or that which, condenses. 2. (Physic) (a) An instrument for condensing air or other elastic fluids, consisting of a cylinder having a movable piston to force the air into a receiver, and a valve to prevent its escape. (b) An instrument for concentrating electricity by the effect of induction between conducting plates separated by a nonconducting plate. (c) A lens or mirror, usually of short focal distance, used to concentrate light upon an object.
Condensible
Condensible Con*den"si*ble, a. Capable of being condensed; as, a gas condensible to a liquid by cold.
Condensing
Condense Con*dense", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Condensed; p. pr. & vb. n. Condensing.] [L. condensare; con- + densare to make thick or dense, densus thick, dense: cf. F. condenser. See Dense, and cf. Condensate.] 1. To make more close, compact, or dense; to compress or concentrate into a smaller compass; to consolidate; to abridge; to epitomize. In what shape they choose, Dilated or condensed, bright or obscure. --Milton. The secret course pursued at Brussels and at Madrid may be condensed into the usual formula, dissimulation, procrastination, and again dissimulation. --Motley. 2. (Chem. & Physics) To reduce into another and denser form, as by cold or pressure; as, to condense gas into a liquid form, or steam into water. Condensed milk, milk reduced to the consistence of very thick cream by evaporation (usually with addition of sugar) for preservation and transportation. Condensing engine, a steam engine in which the steam is condensed after having exerted its force on the piston. Syn: To compress; contract; crowd; thicken; concentrate; abridge; epitomize; reduce.
Condensing engine
Condense Con*dense", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Condensed; p. pr. & vb. n. Condensing.] [L. condensare; con- + densare to make thick or dense, densus thick, dense: cf. F. condenser. See Dense, and cf. Condensate.] 1. To make more close, compact, or dense; to compress or concentrate into a smaller compass; to consolidate; to abridge; to epitomize. In what shape they choose, Dilated or condensed, bright or obscure. --Milton. The secret course pursued at Brussels and at Madrid may be condensed into the usual formula, dissimulation, procrastination, and again dissimulation. --Motley. 2. (Chem. & Physics) To reduce into another and denser form, as by cold or pressure; as, to condense gas into a liquid form, or steam into water. Condensed milk, milk reduced to the consistence of very thick cream by evaporation (usually with addition of sugar) for preservation and transportation. Condensing engine, a steam engine in which the steam is condensed after having exerted its force on the piston. Syn: To compress; contract; crowd; thicken; concentrate; abridge; epitomize; reduce.
Conder
Conder Cond"er, n. [From Cond.] One who watches shoals of fish; a balker. See Balker.
Condescendence
Condescendence Con`de*scend"ence, Condescendency Con`de*scend"en*cy, n. [Cf. F. condescendance.] Condescension. [Obs.]
Condescendency
Condescendence Con`de*scend"ence, Condescendency Con`de*scend"en*cy, n. [Cf. F. condescendance.] Condescension. [Obs.]

Meaning of Conde from wikipedia

- Conde is the Ibero-Romance form of "count" (Latin comitatus). It may refer to: Counts in Iberia List of countships in Portugal Harold Graydon Conde (1898-1959)...
- Condé Nast Inc. is an American m**** media company founded in 1909 by Condé Montrose Nast, and owned by Advance Publications. The company's media brands...
- Château de Condé, a private estate in Condé-en-Brie, Aisne, France Condé, Indre, in the Indre département Condé-en-Brie, in the Aisne département Condé-Folie...
- The Most Serene House of Bourbon-Condé (French: La Plus Sereine Maison de Bourbon-Condé) named after Condé-en-Brie, now in the Aisne département, is a...
- Ninel Herrera Conde (born September 29, 1976) is a Mexican singer, actress and television host known for her performances in Rebelde, Fuego en la sangre...
- Alpha Condé (born 4 March 1938) is a Guinean politician who has been President of Guinea since December 2010. He spent decades in opposition to a succession...
- Pedro Pérez Conde (born 26 July 1988) is a Spanish footballer who plays for Emirati club Shabab Al Ahli as a striker. Born in Villafranca de Córdoba,...
- de Bourbon, Prince of Condé (7 May 1530 – 13 March 1569) was a prominent Huguenot leader and general, the founder of the Condé branch of the House of...
- Maryse Condé (née Boucolon; February 11, 1937) is a French (Guadeloupean) novelist, critic, and playwright. Condé is best known for her novel Ségou (1984–1985)...
- Condé Nast Traveler is a luxury and lifestyle travel magazine published by Condé Nast. The magazine has won 25 National Magazine Awards. The Condé Nast...
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