Definition of Cinerea. Meaning of Cinerea. Synonyms of Cinerea

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Definition of Cinerea

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Atalapha cinerea
Hoary Hoar"y, a. 1. White or whitish. ``The hoary willows.' --Addison. 2. White or gray with age; hoar; as, hoary hairs. Reverence the hoary head. --Dr. T. Dwight. 3. Hence, remote in time past; as, hoary antiquity. 4. Moldy; mossy; musty. [Obs.] --Knolles. 5. (Zo["o]l.) Of a pale silvery gray. 6. (Bot.) Covered with short, dense, grayish white hairs; canescent. Hoary bat (Zo["o]l.), an American bat (Atalapha cinerea), having the hair yellowish, or brown, tipped with white.
E cinerea
Heather Heath"er (?; 277. This is the only pronunciation in Scotland), n. [See Heath.] Heath. [Scot.] Gorse and grass And heather, where his footsteps pass, The brighter seem. --Longfellow. Heather bell (Bot.), one of the pretty subglobose flowers of two European kinds of heather (Erica Tetralix, and E. cinerea).
Grus cinerea
Coolung Coo"lung, n. [From the native name.] (Zo["o]l.) The great gray crane of India (Grus cinerea). [Also written coolen and cullum.]
Grus cinerea
Crane Crane (kr[=a]n), n. [AS. cran; akin to D. & LG. craan, G. kranich, krahn (this in sense 2), Gr. ge`ranos, L. grus, W. & Armor. garan, OSlav. zerav[i^], Lith. gerve, Icel. trani, Sw. trana, Dan. trane. [root]24. Cf. Geranium.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A wading bird of the genus Grus, and allied genera, of various species, having a long, straight bill, and long legs and neck. Note: The common European crane is Grus cinerea. The sand-hill crane (G. Mexicana) and the whooping crane (G. Americana) are large American species. The Balearic or crowned crane is Balearica pavonina. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to the herons and cormorants. 2. A machine for raising and lowering heavy weights, and, while holding them suspended, transporting them through a limited lateral distance. In one form it consists of a projecting arm or jib of timber or iron, a rotating post or base, and the necessary tackle, windlass, etc.; -- so called from a fancied similarity between its arm and the neck of a crane See Illust. of Derrick. 3. An iron arm with horizontal motion, attached to the side or back of a fireplace, for supporting kettles, etc., over a fire. 4. A siphon, or bent pipe, for drawing liquors out of a cask. 5. (Naut.) A forked post or projecting bracket to support spars, etc., -- generally used in pairs. See Crotch, 2. Crane fly (Zo["o]l.), a dipterous insect with long legs, of the genus Tipula. Derrick crane. See Derrick. Gigantic crane. (Zo["o]l.) See Adjutant, n., 3. Traveling crane, Traveler crane, Traversing crane (Mach.), a crane mounted on wheels; esp., an overhead crane consisting of a crab or other hoisting apparatus traveling on rails or beams fixed overhead, as in a machine shop or foundry. Water crane, a kind of hydrant with a long swinging spout, for filling locomotive tenders, water carts, etc., with water.
J cinerea
Note: In some parts of America, especially in New England, the name walnut is given to several species of hickory (Carya), and their fruit. Ash-leaved walnut, a tree (Juglans fraxinifolia), native in Transcaucasia. Black walnut, a North American tree (J. nigra) valuable for its purplish brown wood, which is extensively used in cabinetwork and for gunstocks. The nuts are thick-shelled, and nearly globular. English, or European, walnut, a tree (J. regia), native of Asia from the Caucasus to Japan, valuable for its timber and for its excellent nuts, which are also called Madeira nuts. Walnut brown, a deep warm brown color, like that of the heartwood of the black walnut. Walnut oil, oil extracted from walnut meats. It is used in cooking, making soap, etc. White walnut, a North American tree (J. cinerea), bearing long, oval, thick-shelled, oily nuts, commonly called butternuts. See Butternut.
Juglans cinerea
Butternut But"ter*nut`, n. 1. (Bot.) An American tree (Juglans cinerea) of the Walnut family, and its edible fruit; -- so called from the oil contained in the latter. Sometimes called oil nut and white walnut. 2. (Bot.) The nut of the Caryocar butyrosum and C. nuciferum, of S. America; -- called also Souari nut.
L cinerea or Fabricii
Potato Po*ta"to, n.; pl. Potatoes. [Sp. patata potato, batata sweet potato, from the native American name (probably batata) in Hayti.] (Bot.) (a) A plant (Solanum tuberosum) of the Nightshade family, and its esculent farinaceous tuber, of which there are numerous varieties used for food. It is native of South America, but a form of the species is found native as far north as New Mexico. (b) The sweet potato (see below). Potato beetle, Potato bug. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A beetle (Doryphora decemlineata) which feeds, both in the larval and adult stages, upon the leaves of the potato, often doing great damage. Called also Colorado potato beetle, and Doryphora. See Colorado beetle. (b) The Lema trilineata, a smaller and more slender striped beetle which feeds upon the potato plant, bur does less injury than the preceding species. Potato fly (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of blister beetles infesting the potato vine. The black species (Lytta atrata), the striped (L. vittata), and the gray (L. cinerea, or Fabricii) are the most common. See Blister beetle, under Blister. Potato rot, a disease of the tubers of the potato, supposed to be caused by a kind of mold (Peronospora infestans), which is first seen upon the leaves and stems. Potato weevil (Zo["o]l.), an American weevil (Baridius trinotatus) whose larva lives in and kills the stalks of potato vines, often causing serious damage to the crop. Potato whisky, a strong, fiery liquor, having a hot, smoky taste, and rich in amyl alcohol (fusel oil); it is made from potatoes or potato starch. Potato worm (Zo["o]l.), the large green larva of a sphinx, or hawk moth (Macrosila quinquemaculata); -- called also tomato worm. See Illust. under Tomato. Seaside potato (Bot.), Ipom[oe]a Pes-Capr[ae], a kind of morning-glory with rounded and emarginate or bilobed leaves. [West Indies] Sweet potato (Bot.), a climbing plant (Ipom[oe]a Balatas) allied to the morning-glory. Its farinaceous tubers have a sweetish taste, and are used, when cooked, for food. It is probably a native of Brazil, but is cultivated extensively in the warmer parts of every continent, and even as far north as New Jersey. The name potato was applied to this plant before it was to the Solanum tuberosum, and this is the ``potato' of the Southern United States. Wild potato. (Bot.) (a) A vine (Ipom[oe]a pandurata) having a pale purplish flower and an enormous root. It is common in sandy places in the United States. (b) A similar tropical American plant (I. fastigiata) which it is thought may have been the original stock of the sweet potato.
Perdix cinerea
Partridge Par"tridge, n. [OE. partriche, pertriche, OF. pertris, perdriz, F. perdrix, L. perdix, -icis, fr. Gr. ?.] (Zo["o]l.) 1. Any one of numerous species of small gallinaceous birds of the genus Perdix and several related genera of the family Perdicid[ae], of the Old World. The partridge is noted as a game bird. Full many a fat partrich had he in mew. --Chaucer. Note: The common European, or gray, partridge (Perdix cinerea) and the red-legged partridge (Caccabis rubra) of Southern Europe and Asia are well-known species. 2. Any one of several species of quail-like birds belonging to Colinus, and allied genera. [U.S.] Note: Among them are the bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus) of the Eastern States; the plumed, or mountain, partridge (Oreortyx pictus) of California; the Massena partridge (Cyrtonyx Montezum[ae]); and the California partridge (Callipepla Californica). 3. The ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). [New Eng.] Bamboo partridge (Zo["o]l.), a spurred partridge of the genus Bambusicola. Several species are found in China and the East Indies. Night partridge (Zo["o]l.), the woodcock. [Local, U.S.] Painted partridge (Zo["o]l.), a francolin of South Africa (Francolinus pictus). Partridge berry. (Bot.) (a) The scarlet berry of a trailing american plant (Mitchella repens) of the order Rubiace[ae], having roundish evergreen leaves, and white fragrant flowers sometimes tinged with purple, growing in pairs with the ovaries united, and producing the berries which remain over winter; also, the plant itself. (b) The fruit of the creeping wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens); also, the plant itself. Partridge dove (Zo["o]l.) Same as Mountain witch, under Mountain. Partridge pea (Bot.), a yellow-flowered leguminous herb (Cassia Cham[ae]crista), common in sandy fields in the Eastern United States. Partridge shell (Zo["o]l.), a large marine univalve shell (Dolium perdix), having colors variegated like those of the partridge. Partridge wood (a) A variegated wood, much esteemed for cabinetwork. It is obtained from tropical America, and one source of it is said to be the leguminous tree Andira inermis. Called also pheasant wood. (b) A name sometimes given to the dark-colored and striated wood of some kind of palm, which is used for walking sticks and umbrella handles. Sea partridge (Zo["o]l.), an Asiatic sand partridge (Ammoperdix Bonhami); -- so called from its note. Snow partridge (Zo["o]l.), a large spurred partridge (Lerwa nivicola) which inhabits the high mountains of Asia. Spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood partridge, or Hill partridge (Zo["o]l.), any small Asiatic partridge of the genus Arboricola.
Sylvia cinerea
Whitethroat White"throat`, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of Old World warblers, esp. the common European species (Sylvia cinerea), called also strawsmear, nettlebird, muff, and whitecap, the garden whitethroat, or golden warbler (S. hortensis), and the lesser whitethroat (S. curruca).
Terekia cinerea
Terek Ter"ek, n. [Because found on the Terek River in the Caucasus.] A sandpiper (Terekia cinerea) of the Old World, breeding in the far north of eastern Europe and Asia and migrating to South Africa and Australia. It frequents rivers.
Ulula cinerea
Ulula Ul"u*la, n. [L., a screech owl.] (Zo["o]l.) A genus of owls including the great gray owl (Ulula cinerea) of Arctic America, and other similar species. See Illust. of Owl.
Ulula cinerea
Gray Gray, a. [Compar. Grayer; superl. Grayest.] [OE. gray, grey, AS. gr[=ae]g, gr[=e]g; akin to D. graauw, OHG. gr[=a]o, G. grau, Dan. graa, Sw. gr[*a], Icel. gr[=a]r.] [Written also grey.] 1. White mixed with black, as the color of pepper and salt, or of ashes, or of hair whitened by age; sometimes, a dark mixed color; as, the soft gray eye of a dove. These gray and dun colors may be also produced by mixing whites and blacks. --Sir I. Newton. 2. Gray-haired; gray-headed; of a gray color; hoary. 3. Old; mature; as, gray experience. Ames. Gray antimony (Min.), stibnite. Gray buck (Zo["o]l.), the chickara. Gray cobalt (Min.), smaltite. Gray copper (Min.), tetrahedrite. Gray duck (Zo["o]l.), the gadwall; also applied to the female mallard. Gray falcon (Zo["o]l.) the peregrine falcon. Gray Friar. See Franciscan, and Friar. Gray hen (Zo["o]l.), the female of the blackcock or black grouse. See Heath grouse. Gray mill or millet (Bot.), a name of several plants of the genus Lithospermum; gromwell. Gray mullet (Zo["o]l.) any one of the numerous species of the genus Mugil, or family Mugilid[ae], found both in the Old World and America; as the European species (M. capito, and M. auratus), the American striped mullet (M. albula), and the white or silver mullet (M. Braziliensis). See Mullet. Gray owl (Zo["o]l.), the European tawny or brown owl (Syrnium aluco). The great gray owl (Ulula cinerea) inhabits arctic America. Gray parrot (Zo["o]l.), a parrot (Psittacus erithacus), very commonly domesticated, and noted for its aptness in learning to talk. Gray pike. (Zo["o]l.) See Sauger. Gray snapper (Zo["o]l.), a Florida fish; the sea lawyer. See Snapper. Gray snipe (Zo["o]l.), the dowitcher in winter plumage. Gray whale (Zo["o]l.), a rather large and swift California whale (Rhachianectes glaucus), formerly taken in large numbers in the bays; -- called also grayback, devilfish, and hardhead.
Urosalpinx cinerea
Drill Drill, n. 1. An instrument with an edged or pointed end used for making holes in hard substances; strictly, a tool that cuts with its end, by revolving, as in drilling metals, or by a succession of blows, as in drilling stone; also, a drill press. 2. (Mil.) The act or exercise of training soldiers in the military art, as in the manual of arms, in the execution of evolutions, and the like; hence, diligent and strict instruction and exercise in the rudiments and methods of any business; a kind or method of military exercises; as, infantry drill; battalion drill; artillery drill. 3. Any exercise, physical or mental, enforced with regularity and by constant repetition; as, a severe drill in Latin grammar. 4. (Zo["o]l.) A marine gastropod, of several species, which kills oysters and other bivalves by drilling holes through the shell. The most destructive kind is Urosalpinx cinerea. Bow drill, Breast drill. See under Bow, Breast. Cotter drill, or Traverse drill, a machine tool for drilling slots. Diamond drill. See under Diamond. Drill jig. See under Jig. Drill pin, the pin in a lock which enters the hollow stem of the key. Drill sergeant (Mil.), a noncommissioned officer whose office it is to instruct soldiers as to their duties, and to train them to military exercises and evolutions. Vertical drill, a drill press.

Meaning of Cinerea from wikipedia

- Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic fungus that affects many plant species, although its most notable hosts may be wine grapes. In viticulture, it is commonly...
- The grey heron (Ardea cinerea) is a long-legged predatory wading bird of the heron family, Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also...
- Eucalyptus cinerea, commonly known as the Argyle apple or mealy stringbark, is a species of small to medium-sized tree that is endemic to south-eastern...
- Acrida cinerea, sometimes called the Oriental longheaded gr****hopper/locust or the Chinese gr****hopper[better source needed] (though this name is also...
- Juglans cinerea, commonly known as butternut or white walnut, is a species of walnut native to the eastern United States and southeast Canada. The distribution...
- being the most frequently eaten. The same study showed "nearly 90% of Hyla cinerea prey were actively pursued," with the other 10% being "insects walking...
- cinerea are being used alternatively. The adjective cana, attested in cl****ical Latin, can mean grey, or greyish white. The cl****ical Latin cinerea means...
- Spiraea × cinerea is a species of flowering plant in the rose family. It is a hybrid of garden origin (S. hypericifolia × S. cana). Growing to 1.5 m (4...
- Dichrostachys cinerea, known as sicklebush, Bell mimosa, Chinese lantern tree or Kalahari Christmas tree (South Africa), is a legume of the genus Dichrostachys...
- Neisseria cinerea is a commensal species grouped with the Gram-negative, oxidase-positive, and catalase-positive diplococci. It was first cl****ified as...
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