Definition of Chang. Meaning of Chang. Synonyms of Chang

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Definition of Chang

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Acceptance of a bill of exchange
Note: In modern law, proposal and acceptance are the constituent elements into which all contracts are resolved. Acceptance of a bill of exchange, check, draft, or order, is an engagement to pay it according to the terms. This engagement is usually made by writing the word ``accepted' across the face of the bill. Acceptance of goods, under the statute of frauds, is an intelligent acceptance by a party knowing the nature of the transaction. 6. Meaning; acceptation. [Obs.] Acceptance of persons, partiality, favoritism. See under Accept.
Arbitration of Exchange
Arbitration Ar`bi*tra"tion, n. [F. arbitration, L. arbitratio, fr. arbitrari.] The hearing and determination of a cause between parties in controversy, by a person or persons chosen by the parties. Note: This may be done by one person; but it is usual to choose two or three called arbitrators; or for each party to choose one, and these to name a third, who is called the umpire. Their determination is called the award. --Bouvier Arbitration bond, a bond which obliges one to abide by the award of an arbitration. Arbitration of Exchange, the operation of converting the currency of one country into that of another, or determining the rate of exchange between such countries or currencies. An arbitrated rate is one determined by such arbitration through the medium of one or more intervening currencies.
bill of exchange
Note: In some parts of the United States, notably in the Southern States, raise in also commonly applied to the rearing or bringing up of children. I was raised, as they say in Virginia, among the mountains of the North. --Paulding. (d) To bring into being; to produce; to cause to arise, come forth, or appear; -- often with up. I will raise them up a prophet from among their brethren, like unto thee. --Deut. xviii. 18. God vouchsafes to raise another world From him [Noah], and all his anger to forget. --Milton. (e) To give rise to; to set agoing; to occasion; to start; to originate; as, to raise a smile or a blush. Thou shalt not raise a false report. --Ex. xxiii. 1. (f) To give vent or utterance to; to utter; to strike up. Soon as the prince appears, they raise a cry. --Dryden. (g) To bring to notice; to submit for consideration; as, to raise a point of order; to raise an objection. 4. To cause to rise, as by the effect of leaven; to make light and spongy, as bread. Miss Liddy can dance a jig, and raise paste. --Spectator. 5. (Naut.) (a) To cause (the land or any other object) to seem higher by drawing nearer to it; as, to raise Sandy Hook light. (b) To let go; as in the command, Raise tacks and sheets, i. e., Let go tacks and sheets. 6. (Law) To create or constitute; as, to raise a use that is, to create it. --Burrill. To raise a blockade (Mil.), to remove or break up a blockade, either by withdrawing the ships or forces employed in enforcing it, or by driving them away or dispersing them. To raise a check, note, bill of exchange, etc., to increase fraudulently its nominal value by changing the writing, figures, or printing in which the sum payable is specified.
Change
Change Change, v. i. 1. To be altered; to undergo variation; as, men sometimes change for the better. For I am Lord, I change not. --Mal. iii. 6. 2. To pass from one phase to another; as, the moon changes to-morrow night.
Change
Change Change, n. [F. change, fr. changer. See Change. v. t.] 1. Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles. Apprehensions of a change of dynasty. --Hallam. All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come. --Job xiv. 14. 2. A succesion or substitution of one thing in the place of another; a difference; novelty; variety; as, a change of seasons. Our fathers did for change to France repair. --Dryden. The ringing grooves of change. --Tennyson. 3. A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the moon. 4. Alteration in the order of a series; permutation. 5. That which makes a variety, or may be substituted for another. Thirty change (R.V. changes) of garments. --Judg. xiv. 12. 6. Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due. 7. [See Exchange.] A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; a building appropriated for mercantile transactions. [Colloq. for Exchange.] 8. A public house; an alehouse. [Scot.] They call an alehouse a change. --Burt. 9. (Mus.) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale. Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing. --Holder. Change of life, the period in the life of a woman when menstruation and the capacity for conception cease, usually occurring between forty-five and fifty years of age. Change ringing, the continual production, without repetition, of changes on bells, See def. 9. above. Change wheel (Mech.), one of a set of wheels of different sizes and number of teeth, that may be changed or substituted one for another in machinery, to produce a different but definite rate of angular velocity in an axis, as in cutting screws, gear, etc. To ring the changes on, to present the same facts or arguments in variety of ways. Syn: Variety; variation; alteration; mutation; transition; vicissitude; innovation; novelty; transmutation; revolution; reverse.
Change gear
Change gear Change gear (Mach.) A gear by means of which the speed of machinery or of a vehicle may be changed while that of the propelling engine or motor remains constant; -- called also change-speed gear.
Change key
Change key Change key A key adapted to open only one of a set of locks; -- distinguished from a master key.
Change of life
Change Change, n. [F. change, fr. changer. See Change. v. t.] 1. Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles. Apprehensions of a change of dynasty. --Hallam. All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come. --Job xiv. 14. 2. A succesion or substitution of one thing in the place of another; a difference; novelty; variety; as, a change of seasons. Our fathers did for change to France repair. --Dryden. The ringing grooves of change. --Tennyson. 3. A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the moon. 4. Alteration in the order of a series; permutation. 5. That which makes a variety, or may be substituted for another. Thirty change (R.V. changes) of garments. --Judg. xiv. 12. 6. Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due. 7. [See Exchange.] A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; a building appropriated for mercantile transactions. [Colloq. for Exchange.] 8. A public house; an alehouse. [Scot.] They call an alehouse a change. --Burt. 9. (Mus.) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale. Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing. --Holder. Change of life, the period in the life of a woman when menstruation and the capacity for conception cease, usually occurring between forty-five and fifty years of age. Change ringing, the continual production, without repetition, of changes on bells, See def. 9. above. Change wheel (Mech.), one of a set of wheels of different sizes and number of teeth, that may be changed or substituted one for another in machinery, to produce a different but definite rate of angular velocity in an axis, as in cutting screws, gear, etc. To ring the changes on, to present the same facts or arguments in variety of ways. Syn: Variety; variation; alteration; mutation; transition; vicissitude; innovation; novelty; transmutation; revolution; reverse.
Change ringing
Change Change, n. [F. change, fr. changer. See Change. v. t.] 1. Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles. Apprehensions of a change of dynasty. --Hallam. All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come. --Job xiv. 14. 2. A succesion or substitution of one thing in the place of another; a difference; novelty; variety; as, a change of seasons. Our fathers did for change to France repair. --Dryden. The ringing grooves of change. --Tennyson. 3. A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the moon. 4. Alteration in the order of a series; permutation. 5. That which makes a variety, or may be substituted for another. Thirty change (R.V. changes) of garments. --Judg. xiv. 12. 6. Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due. 7. [See Exchange.] A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; a building appropriated for mercantile transactions. [Colloq. for Exchange.] 8. A public house; an alehouse. [Scot.] They call an alehouse a change. --Burt. 9. (Mus.) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale. Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing. --Holder. Change of life, the period in the life of a woman when menstruation and the capacity for conception cease, usually occurring between forty-five and fifty years of age. Change ringing, the continual production, without repetition, of changes on bells, See def. 9. above. Change wheel (Mech.), one of a set of wheels of different sizes and number of teeth, that may be changed or substituted one for another in machinery, to produce a different but definite rate of angular velocity in an axis, as in cutting screws, gear, etc. To ring the changes on, to present the same facts or arguments in variety of ways. Syn: Variety; variation; alteration; mutation; transition; vicissitude; innovation; novelty; transmutation; revolution; reverse.
Change wheel
Change Change, n. [F. change, fr. changer. See Change. v. t.] 1. Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles. Apprehensions of a change of dynasty. --Hallam. All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come. --Job xiv. 14. 2. A succesion or substitution of one thing in the place of another; a difference; novelty; variety; as, a change of seasons. Our fathers did for change to France repair. --Dryden. The ringing grooves of change. --Tennyson. 3. A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the moon. 4. Alteration in the order of a series; permutation. 5. That which makes a variety, or may be substituted for another. Thirty change (R.V. changes) of garments. --Judg. xiv. 12. 6. Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due. 7. [See Exchange.] A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; a building appropriated for mercantile transactions. [Colloq. for Exchange.] 8. A public house; an alehouse. [Scot.] They call an alehouse a change. --Burt. 9. (Mus.) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale. Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing. --Holder. Change of life, the period in the life of a woman when menstruation and the capacity for conception cease, usually occurring between forty-five and fifty years of age. Change ringing, the continual production, without repetition, of changes on bells, See def. 9. above. Change wheel (Mech.), one of a set of wheels of different sizes and number of teeth, that may be changed or substituted one for another in machinery, to produce a different but definite rate of angular velocity in an axis, as in cutting screws, gear, etc. To ring the changes on, to present the same facts or arguments in variety of ways. Syn: Variety; variation; alteration; mutation; transition; vicissitude; innovation; novelty; transmutation; revolution; reverse.
Changeability
Changeability Change`a*bil"i*ty, n. Changeableness.
Changeable
Changeable Change"a*ble, a. [Cf. F. changeable.] 1. Capable of change; subject to alteration; mutable; variable; fickle; inconstant; as, a changeable humor. 2. Appearing different, as in color, in different lights, or under different circumstances; as, changeable silk. Syn: Mutable; alterable; variable; inconstant; fitful; vacillating; capricious; fickle; unstable; unsteady; unsettled; wavering; erratic; giddy; volatile.
Changeableness
Changeableness Change"a*ble*ness, n. The quality of being changeable; fickleness; inconstancy; mutability.
Changeably
Changeably Change"a*bly, adv. In a changeable manner.
Changeful
Changeful Change"ful, a. Full of change; mutable; inconstant; fickle; uncertain. --Pope. His course had been changeful. --Motley. -- Change"ful*ly, adv. -- Change"ful*ness, n.
Changefully
Changeful Change"ful, a. Full of change; mutable; inconstant; fickle; uncertain. --Pope. His course had been changeful. --Motley. -- Change"ful*ly, adv. -- Change"ful*ness, n.
Changefulness
Changeful Change"ful, a. Full of change; mutable; inconstant; fickle; uncertain. --Pope. His course had been changeful. --Motley. -- Change"ful*ly, adv. -- Change"ful*ness, n.
Changeless
Changeless Change"less, a. That can not be changed; constant; as, a changeless purpose. -- Change"less*ness, n.
Changelessness
Changeless Change"less, a. That can not be changed; constant; as, a changeless purpose. -- Change"less*ness, n.
Changeling
Changeling Change"ling, a. 1. Taken or left in place of another; changed. ``A little changeling boy.' --Shak. 2. Given to change; inconstant. [Obs.] Some are so studiously changeling. --Boyle.
Changer
Changer Chan"ger, n. 1. One who changes or alters the form of anything. 2. One who deals in or changes money. --John ii. 14. 3. One apt to change; an inconstant person.
change-speed gear
Change gear Change gear (Mach.) A gear by means of which the speed of machinery or of a vehicle may be changed while that of the propelling engine or motor remains constant; -- called also change-speed gear.
Counterchange
Counterchange Coun"ter*change` (koun"t[~e]r*ch[=a]nj`), n. Exchange; reciprocation.
Counterchange
Counterchange Coun`ter*change" (koun`t[~e]r*ch[=a]nj), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Counterchanged (-ch?njd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Counterchanging.] 1. To give and receive; to cause to change places; to exchange. 2. To checker; to diversify, as in heraldic counterchanging. See Counterchaged, a., 2. Witch-elms, that counterchange the floor Of this flat lawn with dusk and bright. --Tennyson.
Counterchanged
Counterchanged Coun`ter*changed" (-ch?njd"), a. 1. Exchanged. 2. (Her.) Having the tinctures exchanged mutually; thus, if the field is divided palewise, or and azure, and cross is borne counterchanged, that part of the cross which comes on the azure side will be or, and that on the or side will be azure.
Counterchanged
Counterchange Coun`ter*change" (koun`t[~e]r*ch[=a]nj), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Counterchanged (-ch?njd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Counterchanging.] 1. To give and receive; to cause to change places; to exchange. 2. To checker; to diversify, as in heraldic counterchanging. See Counterchaged, a., 2. Witch-elms, that counterchange the floor Of this flat lawn with dusk and bright. --Tennyson.
Counterchanging
Counterchange Coun`ter*change" (koun`t[~e]r*ch[=a]nj), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Counterchanged (-ch?njd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Counterchanging.] 1. To give and receive; to cause to change places; to exchange. 2. To checker; to diversify, as in heraldic counterchanging. See Counterchaged, a., 2. Witch-elms, that counterchange the floor Of this flat lawn with dusk and bright. --Tennyson.
Exchange
Exchange Ex*change", v. i. To be changed or received in exchange for; to pass in exchange; as, dollar exchanges for ten dimes.
Exchange broker
Broker Bro"ker (br[=o]"k[~e]r), n. [OE. brocour, from a word akin to broken, bruken, to use, enjoy, possess, digest, fr. AS. br[=u]can to use, enjoy; cf. Fries. broker, F. brocanteur. See Brook, v. t.] 1. One who transacts business for another; an agent. 2. (Law) An agent employed to effect bargains and contracts, as a middleman or negotiator, between other persons, for a compensation commonly called brokerage. He takes no possession, as broker, of the subject matter of the negotiation. He generally contracts in the names of those who employ him, and not in his own. --Story. 3. A dealer in money, notes, bills of exchange, etc. 4. A dealer in secondhand goods. [Eng.] 5. A pimp or procurer. [Obs.] --Shak. Bill broker, one who buys and sells notes and bills of exchange. Curbstone broker or Street broker, an operator in stocks (not a member of the Stock Exchange) who executes orders by running from office to office, or by transactions on the street. [U.S.] Exchange broker, one who buys and sells uncurrent money, and deals in exchanges relating to money. Insurance broker, one who is agent in procuring insurance on vessels, or against fire. Pawn broker. See Pawnbroker. Real estate broker, one who buys and sells lands, and negotiates loans, etc., upon mortgage. Ship broker, one who acts as agent in buying and selling ships, procuring freight, etc. Stock broker. See Stockbroker.
Exchange editor
Exchange editor Ex*change" ed"i*tor An editor who inspects, and culls from, periodicals, or exchanges, for his own publication.

Meaning of Chang from wikipedia

- Chang may refer to: Chang (surname), the romanization of several separate Chinese surnames Chang or Jang (Korean name), romanizations of the Korean surname...
- Coordinates: 34°16′N 108°54′E / 34.267°N 108.900°E / 34.267; 108.900 Chang'an Chang'an ([ʈʂʰǎŋ.án] (listen); simplified Chinese: 长安; traditional Chinese:...
- David Chang (Korean: Chang Seok-ho 장석호; born August 5, 1977) is an American restaurateur, author, and television personality. He is the founder of the...
- Michael Te-Pei Chang (born February 22, 1972) is an American retired professional tennis player. He is the youngest male player in history to win a Grand...
- Janine Chang or Chang Chun-ning (Chinese: 張鈞甯; pinyin: Zhāng Jūnníng; born 4 September 1982) is a Taiwanese actress. Chang attended National Taipei University...
- Ji Chang-wook (born July 5, 1987) is a South Korean actor. He rose to fame playing the leading role of Dong-hae in daily drama series Smile Again (2010–2011)...
- Chang Chen (born 14 October 1976), sometimes credited as Chen Chang according to Western name order, is a Taiwanese actor. His father Chang Kuo-chu and...
- Meiyang Chang (born 6 October 1982 in Dhanbad, Jharkhand) is an Indian actor, television host and singer of Chinese descent. He is an alumnus of the De...
- Christina Chang (Chinese: 張韻明) is a Taiwanese-born American actress, who has appeared in 24, CSI: Miami, Nashville, and The Good Doctor. Chang was born...
- Chang Chang-sun (or Jang Chang-seon, Hangul: 장창선, Hanja: 張昌宣; born June 12, 1942) is a retired South Korean freestyle wrestler. He won a silver medal at...
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