Definition of Caudatus. Meaning of Caudatus. Synonyms of Caudatus

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Definition of Caudatus

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AEgithalos caudatus
Titmouse Tit"mouse`, n.; pl. Titmice. [OE. titemose, titmase; tit small, or a small bird + AS. m[=a]se a kind of small bird; akin to D. mees a titmouse, G. meise, OHG. meisa, Icel. meisingr. The English form has been influenced by the unrelated word mouse. Cf. Tit a small bird.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of small insectivorous singing birds belonging to Parus and allied genera; -- called also tit, and tomtit. Note: The blue titmouse (Parus c[oe]ruleus), the marsh titmouse (P. palustris), the crested titmouse (P. cristatus), the great titmouse (P. major), and the long tailed titmouse ([AE]githalos caudatus), are the best-known European species. See Chickadee.
Amarantus caudatus
Thrumwort Thrum"wort`, n. (Bot.) A kind of amaranth (Amarantus caudatus). --Dr. Prior.
Amphicerus bicaudatus
Twig Twig, n. [AS. twig; akin to D. twijg, OHG. zwig, zwi, G. zweig, and probably to E. two.] A small shoot or branch of a tree or other plant, of no definite length or size. The Britons had boats made of willow twigs, covered on the outside with hides. --Sir T. Raleigh. Twig borer (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small beetles which bore into twigs of shrubs and trees, as the apple-tree twig borer (Amphicerus bicaudatus). Twig girdler. (Zo["o]l.) See Girdler, 3. Twig rush (Bot.), any rushlike plant of the genus Cladium having hard, and sometimes prickly-edged, leaves or stalks. See Saw grass, under Saw.
C caudatus
Cosmos Cos"mos, n. (Bot.) A genus of composite plants closely related to Bidens, usually with very showy flowers, some with yellow, others with red, scarlet, purple, white, or lilac rays. They are natives of the warmer parts of America, and many species are cultivated. Cosmos bipinnatus and C. diversifolius are among the best-known species; C. caudatus, of the West Indies, is widely naturalized.
C caudatus
Shark Shark, n. [Of uncertain origin; perhaps through OF. fr. carcharus a kind of dogfish, Gr. karchari`as, so called from its sharp teeth, fr. ka`rcharos having sharp or jagged teeth; or perhaps named from its rapacity (cf. Shark, v. t. & i.); cf. Corn. scarceas.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of elasmobranch fishes of the order Plagiostomi, found in all seas. Note: Some sharks, as the basking shark and the whale shark, grow to an enormous size, the former becoming forty feet or more, and the latter sixty feet or more, in length. Most of them are harmless to man, but some are exceedingly voracious. The man-eating sharks mostly belong to the genera Carcharhinus, Carcharodon, and related genera. They have several rows of large sharp teeth with serrated edges, as the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, or Rondeleti) of tropical seas, and the great blue shark (Carcharhinus glaucus) of all tropical and temperate seas. The former sometimes becomes thirty-six feet long, and is the most voracious and dangerous species known. The rare man-eating shark of the United States coast (Charcarodon Atwoodi) is thought by some to be a variety, or the young, of C. carcharias. The dusky shark (Carcharhinus obscurus), and the smaller blue shark (C. caudatus), both common species on the coast of the United States, are of moderate size and not dangerous. They feed on shellfish and bottom fishes. 2. A rapacious, artful person; a sharper. [Colloq.] 3. Trickery; fraud; petty rapine; as, to live upon the shark. [Obs.] --South. Baskin shark, Liver shark, Nurse shark, Oil shark, Sand shark, Tiger shark, etc. See under Basking, Liver, etc. See also Dogfish, Houndfish, Notidanian, and Tope. Gray shark, the sand shark. Hammer-headed shark. See Hammerhead. Port Jackson shark. See Cestraciont. Shark barrow, the eggcase of a shark; a sea purse. Shark ray. Same as Angel fish (a), under Angel. Thrasher shark, or Thresher shark, a large, voracious shark. See Thrasher. Whale shark, a huge harmless shark (Rhinodon typicus) of the Indian Ocean. It becomes sixty feet or more in length, but has very small teeth.
Centetes ecaudatus
Tenrec Ten"rec, n. [From the native name: cf. F. tanrac, tanrec, tandrec.] (Zo["o]l.) A small insectivore (Centetes ecaudatus), native of Madagascar, but introduced also into the islands of Bourbon and Mauritius; -- called also tanrec. The name is applied to other allied genera. See Tendrac.
I brevicaudatus
Indris In"dris, Indri In"dri, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any lemurine animal of the genus Indris. Note: Several species are known, all of them natives of Madagascar, as the diadem indris (I. diadema), which has a white ruff around the forehead; the woolly indris (I. laniger); and the short-tailed or black indris (I. brevicaudatus), which is black, varied with gray.
Lepidopus caudatus or argyreus
Scabbard Scab"bard, n. [OE. scaubert, scauberk, OF. escaubers, escauberz, pl., scabbards, probably of German or Scan. origin; cf. Icel. sk[=a]lpr scabbard, and G. bergen to conceal. Cf. Hauberk.] The case in which the blade of a sword, dagger, etc., is kept; a sheath. Nor in thy scabbard sheathe that famous blade. --Fairfax. Scabbard fish (Zo["o]l.), a long, compressed, silver-colored t[ae]nioid fish (Lepidopus caudatus, or argyreus), found on the European coasts, and more abundantly about New Zealand, where it is called frostfish and considered an excellent food fish.
Raphanus caudatus
Radish Rad"ish, n. [F. radis; cf. It. radice, Pr. raditz: all fr. L. radix, -icis, a root, an edible root, especially a radish, akin to E. wort. See Wort, and cf. Eradicate, Race a root, Radix.] (Bot.) The pungent fleshy root of a well-known cruciferous plant (Paphanus sativus); also, the whole plant. Radish fly (Zo["o]l.), a small two-winged fly (Anthomyia raphani) whose larv[ae] burrow in radishes. It resembles the onion fly. Rat-tailed radish (Bot.), an herb (Raphanus caudatus) having a long, slender pod, which is sometimes eaten. Wild radish (Bot.), the jointed charlock.

Meaning of Caudatus from wikipedia

- Ecoport token for Amaranthus caudatus L. "Wild Food Plants Attracting Additional Consumer Categories": Amaranthus caudatus (Famine Food Guide website)...
- Cosmos caudatus is an annual plant in the genus Cosmos, bearing purple, pink, or white ray florets. It is native to Latin America (from Rio Grande do Sul...
- name Parus caudatus. The specific epithet caudatus is the Latin word for "tailed". Linnaeus did not invent this Latin name. "Parus caudatus" had been used...
- basal ganglia is blue DetailsPart ofdorsal striatumIdentifiersLatinnucleus caudatusMeSHD002421NeuroNames226NeuroLex IDbirnlex_1373TAA14.1.09.502FMA61833Anatomical...
- The lilac-breasted roller (Coracias caudatus) is an African member of the roller (or Coraciidae) family of birds. It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan...
- California pigweed Amaranthus cannabinus – tidal-marsh amaranth Amaranthus caudatus – love-lies-bleeding, pendant amaranth, t****el flower, quilete Amaranthus...
- regions like the right globus pallidus, the right ****men, and the nucleus caudatus are structurally affected in children with ADHD. These changes and alterations...
- The silver scabbardfish (also frostfish, beltfish), Lepidopus caudatus, is a cutl****fish of the family Trichiuridae found throughout the temperate seas...
- It is also found in Tasmania. "Acianthus caudatus". APNI. Retrieved 5 December 2017. "Acianthus caudatus". World Checklist of Selected Plant Families...
- as the species Raph**** caudatus; it is now sometimes treated as a variety of the common radish (R. sativus), either caudatus or mougri. It is found primarily...
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