Definition of Canonical. Meaning of Canonical. Synonyms of Canonical

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Definition of Canonical

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Canonical books
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical epistles
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical form
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical hours
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical letters
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical life
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical obedience
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical punishments
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical Scriptures
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonical sins
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Canonically
Canonically Ca*non"ic*al*ly, adv. In a canonical manner; according to the canons.
Canonicalness
Canonicalness Ca*non"ic*al*ness, n. The quality of being canonical; canonicity. --Bp. Burnet.
Canonicals
Canonicals Ca*non"ic*als, n. pl. The dress prescribed by canon to be worn by a clergyman when officiating. Sometimes, any distinctive professional dress. Full canonicals, the complete costume of an officiating clergyman or ecclesiastic. i
Deuterocanonical
Deuterocanonical Deu`ter*o*ca*non"ic*al, a. [Gr. ? second + E. canonical.] Pertaining to a second canon, or ecclesiastical writing of inferior authority; -- said of the Apocrypha, certain Epistles, etc.
Full canonicals
Canonicals Ca*non"ic*als, n. pl. The dress prescribed by canon to be worn by a clergyman when officiating. Sometimes, any distinctive professional dress. Full canonicals, the complete costume of an officiating clergyman or ecclesiastic. i
Protocanonical
Protocanonical Pro`to*ca*non"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to the first canon, or that which contains the authorized collection of the books of Scripture; -- opposed to deutero-canonical.

Meaning of Canonical from wikipedia

- Canonical may refer to: Canonical form, a natural unique representation of an object, or a preferred notation for some object Canonical coordinates, sets...
- Canonical Ltd. is a UK-based privately held computer software company founded and funded by South African entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth to market commercial...
- In computer science, canonicalization (sometimes standardization or normalization) is a process for converting data that has more than one possible representation...
- In statistical mechanics, a canonical ensemble is the statistical ensemble that represents the possible states of a mechanical system in thermal equilibrium...
- In mathematics and computer science, a canonical, normal, or standard form of a mathematical object is a standard way of presenting that object as a mathematical...
- and the Eastern Orthodox Church to be canonical books of the Old Testament but which are considered non-canonical by Protestant denominations. They are...
- supported until 2028. Ubuntu is developed by Canonical and the community under a meritocratic governance model. Canonical provides security updates and support...
- came to be used for the books in which the message was set out. The four canonical gospels — Matthew, Mark, Luke and John — were written between AD 70 and...
- authorities of their respective faiths and denominations. Believers consider canonical books as inspired by God or as expressive of the authoritative history...
- A canonical link element is an HTML element that helps webmasters prevent duplicate content issues in search engine optimization by specifying the "canonical"...
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