Definition of Barbatus. Meaning of Barbatus. Synonyms of Barbatus

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Definition of Barbatus

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Dianthus barbatus
London tuft London tuft (Bot.) The Sweet William (Dianthus barbatus).
Dianthus barbatus
Sweet Sweet, a. [Compar. Sweeter; superl. Sweetest.] [OE. swete, swote, sote, AS. sw[=e]te; akin to OFries. sw[=e]te, OS. sw[=o]ti, D. zoet, G. s["u]ss, OHG. suozi, Icel. s[ae]tr, s[oe]tr, Sw. s["o]t, Dan. s["o]d, Goth. suts, L. suavis, for suadvis, Gr. ?, Skr. sv[=a]du sweet, svad, sv[=a]d, to sweeten. [root]175. Cf. Assuage, Suave, Suasion.] 1. Having an agreeable taste or flavor such as that of sugar; saccharine; -- opposed to sour and bitter; as, a sweet beverage; sweet fruits; sweet oranges. 2. Pleasing to the smell; fragrant; redolent; balmy; as, a sweet rose; sweet odor; sweet incense. The breath of these flowers is sweet to me. --Longfellow. 3. Pleasing to the ear; soft; melodious; harmonious; as, the sweet notes of a flute or an organ; sweet music; a sweet voice; a sweet singer. To make his English sweet upon his tongue. --Chaucer. A voice sweet, tremulous, but powerful. --Hawthorne. 4. Pleasing to the eye; beautiful; mild and attractive; fair; as, a sweet face; a sweet color or complexion. Sweet interchange Of hill and valley, rivers, woods, and plains. --Milton. 5. Fresh; not salt or brackish; as, sweet water. --Bacon. 6. Not changed from a sound or wholesome state. Specifically: (a) Not sour; as, sweet milk or bread. (b) Not state; not putrescent or putrid; not rancid; as, sweet butter; sweet meat or fish. 7. Plaesing to the mind; mild; gentle; calm; amiable; winning; presuasive; as, sweet manners. Canst thou bind the sweet influence of Pleiades? --Job xxxviii. 31. Mildness and sweet reasonableness is the one established rule of Christian working. --M. Arnold. Note: Sweet is often used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; as, sweet-blossomed, sweet-featured, sweet-smelling, sweet-tempered, sweet-toned, etc. Sweet alyssum. (Bot.) See Alyssum. Sweet apple. (Bot.) (a) Any apple of sweet flavor. (b) See Sweet-top. Sweet bay. (Bot.) (a) The laurel (laurus nobilis). (b) Swamp sassafras. Sweet calabash (Bot.), a plant of the genus Passiflora (P. maliformis) growing in the West Indies, and producing a roundish, edible fruit, the size of an apple. Sweet cicely. (Bot.) (a) Either of the North American plants of the umbelliferous genus Osmorrhiza having aromatic roots and seeds, and white flowers. --Gray. (b) A plant of the genus Myrrhis (M. odorata) growing in England. Sweet calamus, or Sweet cane. (Bot.) Same as Sweet flag, below. Sweet Cistus (Bot.), an evergreen shrub (Cistus Ladanum) from which the gum ladanum is obtained. Sweet clover. (Bot.) See Melilot. Sweet coltsfoot (Bot.), a kind of butterbur (Petasites sagittata) found in Western North America. Sweet corn (Bot.), a variety of the maize of a sweet taste. See the Note under Corn. Sweet fern (Bot.), a small North American shrub (Comptonia, or Myrica, asplenifolia) having sweet-scented or aromatic leaves resembling fern leaves. Sweet flag (Bot.), an endogenous plant (Acorus Calamus) having long flaglike leaves and a rootstock of a pungent aromatic taste. It is found in wet places in Europe and America. See Calamus, 2. Sweet gale (Bot.), a shrub (Myrica Gale) having bitter fragrant leaves; -- also called sweet willow, and Dutch myrtle. See 5th Gale. Sweet grass (Bot.), holy, or Seneca, grass. Sweet gum (Bot.), an American tree (Liquidambar styraciflua). See Liquidambar. Sweet herbs, fragrant herbs cultivated for culinary purposes. Sweet John (Bot.), a variety of the sweet William. Sweet leaf (Bot.), horse sugar. See under Horse. Sweet marjoram. (Bot.) See Marjoram. Sweet marten (Zo["o]l.), the pine marten. Sweet maudlin (Bot.), a composite plant (Achillea Ageratum) allied to milfoil. Sweet oil, olive oil. Sweet pea. (Bot.) See under Pea. Sweet potato. (Bot.) See under Potato. Sweet rush (Bot.), sweet flag. Sweet spirits of niter (Med. Chem.) See Spirit of nitrous ether, under Spirit. Sweet sultan (Bot.), an annual composite plant (Centaurea moschata), also, the yellow-flowered (C. odorata); -- called also sultan flower. Sweet tooth, an especial fondness for sweet things or for sweetmeats. [Colloq.] Sweet William. (a) (Bot.) A species of pink (Dianthus barbatus) of many varieties. (b) (Zo["o]l.) The willow warbler. (c) (Zo["o]l.) The European goldfinch; -- called also sweet Billy. [Prov. Eng.] Sweet willow (Bot.), sweet gale. Sweet wine. See Dry wine, under Dry. To be sweet on, to have a particular fondness for, or special interest in, as a young man for a young woman. [Colloq.] --Thackeray. Syn: Sugary; saccharine; dulcet; luscious.
Erignathus barbatus
Seal Seal (s[=e]l), n. [OE. sele, AS. seolh; akin to OHG. selah, Dan. s[ae]l, Sw. sj["a]l, Icel. selr.] (Zo["o]l.) Any aquatic carnivorous mammal of the families Phocid[ae] and Otariid[ae]. Note: Seals inhabit seacoasts, and are found principally in the higher latitudes of both hemispheres. There are numerous species, bearing such popular names as sea lion, sea leopard, sea bear, or ursine seal, fur seal, and sea elephant. The bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus), the hooded seal (Cystophora crustata), and the ringed seal (Phoca f[oe]tida), are northern species. See also Eared seal, Harp seal, and Fur seal, under Eared, Harp, Monk, and Fur. Seals are much hunted for their skins and fur, and also for their oil, which in some species is very abundant. Harbor seal (Zo["o]l.), the common seal (Phoca vitulina). It inhabits both the North Atlantic and the North Pacific Ocean, and often ascends rivers; -- called also marbled seal, native seal, river seal, bay seal, land seal, sea calf, sea cat, sea dog, dotard, ranger, selchie, tangfish.
Gypaetus barbatus
Lammergeir Lam"mer*geir, Lammergeier Lam"mer*gei`er, n. [G. l["a]mmergeier; lamm, pl. l["a]mmer, lamb + geier vulture.] (Zo["o]l.) A very large vulture (Gypa["e]tus barbatus), which inhabits the mountains of Southern Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa. When full-grown it is nine or ten feet in extent of wings. It is brownish black above, with the under parts and neck rusty yellow; the forehead and crown white; the sides of the head and beard black. It feeds partly on carrion and partly on small animals, which it kills. It has the habit of carrying tortoises and marrow bones to a great height, and dropping them on stones to obtain the contents, and is therefore called bonebreaker and ossifrage. It is supposed to be the ossifrage of the Bible. Called also bearded vulture and bearded eagle. [Written also lammergeyer.]
Mullus barbatus
Mullet Mul"let, n. [OE. molet, mulet, F. mulet, fr. L. mullus.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous fishes of the genus Mugil; -- called also gray mullets. They are found on the coasts of both continents, and are highly esteemed as food. Among the most valuable species are Mugil capito of Europe, and M. cephalus which occurs both on the European and American coasts. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of the genus Mullus, or family Mullid[ae]; called also red mullet, and surmullet, esp. the plain surmullet (Mullus barbatus), and the striped surmullet (M. surmulletus) of Southern Europe. The former is the mullet of the Romans. It is noted for the brilliancy of its colors. See Surmullet. French mullet. See Ladyfish (a) .
Nemachilus barbatus
Beardie Beard"ie, n. [From Beard, n.] (Zo["o]l.) The bearded loach (Nemachilus barbatus) of Europe. [Scot.]
Pogonomyrmex barbatus
Harvesting Har"vest*ing, a. & n., from Harvest, v. t. Harvesting ant (Zo["o]l.), any species of ant which gathers and stores up seeds for food. Many species are known. Note: The species found in Southern Europe and Palestine are Aphenogaster structor and A. barbara; that of Texas, called agricultural ant, is Pogonomyrmex barbatus or Myrmica molifaciens; that of Florida is P. crudelis. See Agricultural ant, under Agricultural.

Meaning of Barbatus from wikipedia

- Barbatus is a word of Latin origin meaning "bearded". It can refer to: People: Barbatus of Benevento (c. 610–682), bishop of Benevento from 663 to 682...
- The bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), also known as the lammergeier (or lammergeyer) or ossifrage, is a bird of prey and the only member of the genus...
- Plectranthus barbatus contains rosmarinic acid and also flavonoid glucuronides and diterpenoids. The chemical constituents of Plectranthus barbatus showed activities...
- are two varieties: Dianthus barbatus var. barbatus. Southern Europe. Leaves broader, up to 2 cm broad. Dianthus barbatus var. asiaticus Nakai. Northeastern...
- Retrieved 27 February 2018. Data related to Sus barbatus at Wikispecies Media related to Sus barbatus at Wikimedia Commons Groves, C. P. (1997). "Taxonomy...
- Pogonomyrmex barbatus is a species of harvester ant from the genus Pogonomyrmex. Its common names include red ant and red harvester ant. These large (5–...
- Costus barbatus is native to Costa Rica. Plants are pollinated by hummingbirds. Costus barbatus are po****r as cut flowers. "Costus barbatus Suess"....
- are two recognized subspecies of this seal: Erignathus barbatus barbatus Erignathus barbatus nautica While the validity of these subspecies has been...
- The common bulbul (Pyc****tus barbatus) is a member of the bulbul family of p****erine birds. It is found in north-eastern, northern, western and central...
- Penstemon barbatus, known by the common names golden-beard penstemon, and beardlip penstemon, is a flowering plant native to the western United States...
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