Definition of Australis. Meaning of Australis. Synonyms of Australis

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Definition of Australis

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A australis
Kivikivi Ki`vi*ki"vi, Kiwikiwi Ki`wi*ki"wi, n.; pl. Kivikivies (?), Kiwikiwies. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of Apteryx, esp. A. australis; -- so called in imitation of its notes. Called also kiwi. See Apteryx.
Agathis or Dammara australis
Kauri Ka"u*ri, n. [Native name.] (Bot.) A lofty coniferous tree of New Zealand Agathis, or Dammara, australis), furnishing valuable timber and yielding one kind of dammar resin. [Written also kaudi, cowdie, and cowrie.]
Anthistiria australis
Kangaroo apple (Bot.), the edible fruit of the Tasmanian plant Solanum aviculare. Kangaroo grass (Bot.), a perennial Australian forage grass (Anthistiria australis). Kangaroo hare (Zo["o]l.), the jerboa kangaroo. See under Jerboa. Kangaroo mouse. (Zo["o]l.) See Jumping mouse, under Jumping. Kangaroo rat (Zo["o]l.), the potoroo.
Aurora australis
Aurora Au*ro"ra, n.; pl. E. Auroras, L. (rarely used) Auror[ae]. [L. aurora, for ausosa, akin to Gr. ?, ?, dawn, Skr. ushas, and E. east.] 1. The rising light of the morning; the dawn of day; the redness of the sky just before the sun rises. 2. The rise, dawn, or beginning. --Hawthorne. 3. (Class. Myth.) The Roman personification of the dawn of day; the goddess of the morning. The poets represented her a rising out of the ocean, in a chariot, with rosy fingers dropping gentle dew. 4. (Bot.) A species of crowfoot. --Johnson. 5. The aurora borealis or aurora australis (northern or southern lights). Aurora borealis, i. e., northern daybreak; popularly called northern lights. A luminous meteoric phenomenon, visible only at night, and supposed to be of electrical origin. This species of light usually appears in streams, ascending toward the zenith from a dusky line or bank, a few degrees above the northern horizon; when reaching south beyond the zenith, it forms what is called the corona, about a spot in the heavens toward which the dipping needle points. Occasionally the aurora appears as an arch of light across the heavens from east to west. Sometimes it assumes a wavy appearance, and the streams of light are then called merry dancers. They assume a variety of colors, from a pale red or yellow to a deep red or blood color. The Aurora australisis a corresponding phenomenon in the southern hemisphere, the streams of light ascending in the same manner from near the southern horizon.
Backhousia Australis
Lancewood Lance"wood`, n. (Bot.) A tough, elastic wood, often used for the shafts of gigs, archery bows, fishing rods, and the like. Also, the tree which produces this wood, Duguetia Quitarensis (a native of Guiana and Cuba), and several other trees of the same family (Anonase[ae]). Australian lancewood, a myrtaceous tree (Backhousia Australis).
C australis
Note: Two or three hundred varieties of plums derived from the Prunus domestica are described; among them the greengage, the Orleans, the purple gage, or Reine Claude Violette, and the German prune, are some of the best known. Note: Among the true plums are; Beach plum, the Prunus maritima, and its crimson or purple globular drupes, Bullace plum. See Bullace. Chickasaw plum, the American Prunus Chicasa, and its round red drupes. Orleans plum, a dark reddish purple plum of medium size, much grown in England for sale in the markets. Wild plum of America, Prunus Americana, with red or yellow fruit, the original of the Iowa plum and several other varieties. Among plants called plum, but of other genera than Prunus, are; Australian plum, Cargillia arborea and C. australis, of the same family with the persimmon. Blood plum, the West African H[ae]matostaphes Barteri. Cocoa plum, the Spanish nectarine. See under Nectarine. Date plum. See under Date. Gingerbread plum, the West African Parinarium macrophyllum. Gopher plum, the Ogeechee lime. Gray plum, Guinea plum. See under Guinea. Indian plum, several species of Flacourtia. 2. A grape dried in the sun; a raisin. 3. A handsome fortune or property; formerly, in cant language, the sum of [pounds]100,000 sterling; also, the person possessing it. Plum bird, Plum budder (Zo["o]l.), the European bullfinch. Plum gouger (Zo["o]l.), a weevil, or curculio (Coccotorus scutellaris), which destroys plums. It makes round holes in the pulp, for the reception of its eggs. The larva bores into the stone and eats the kernel. Plum weevil (Zo["o]l.), an American weevil which is very destructive to plums, nectarines cherries, and many other stone fruits. It lays its eggs in crescent-shaped incisions made with its jaws. The larva lives upon the pulp around the stone. Called also turk, and plum curculio. See Illust. under Curculio.
Celtis australis
Lote Lote, n. [L. lotus, Gr. ?. Cf. Lotus.] (Bot.) A large tree (Celtis australis), found in the south of Europe. It has a hard wood, and bears a cherrylike fruit. Called also nettle tree. --Eng. Cyc.
Celtis australis
Honeyberry Hon"ey*ber`ry, n.; pl. -berries. The fruit of either of two trees having sweetish berries: (a) An Old World hackberry (Celtis australis). (b) In the West Indies, the genip (Melicocca bijuga).
Kingia australis
Grass tree Grass" tree" (Bot.) (a) An Australian plant of the genus Xanthorrh[oe]a, having a thick trunk crowned with a dense tuft of pendulous, grasslike leaves, from the center of which arises a long stem, bearing at its summit a dense flower spike looking somewhat like a large cat-tail. These plants are often called ``blackboys' from the large trunks denuded and blackened by fire. They yield two kinds of fragrant resin, called Botany-bay gum, and Gum Acaroides. (b) A similar Australian plant (Kingia australis).
Ocydromus australis
Weka We"ka, n. (Zo["o]l.) A New Zealand rail (Ocydromus australis) which has wings so short as to be incapable of flight.
P australis
Pine Pine, n. [AS. p[=i]n, L. pinus.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. See Pinus. Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United States, of which the white pine (P. Strobus), the Georgia pine (P. australis), the red pine (P. resinosa), and the great West Coast sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) are among the most valuable. The Scotch pine or fir, also called Norway or Riga pine (Pinus sylvestris), is the only British species. The nut pine is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See Pinon. The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera. 2. The wood of the pine tree. 3. A pineapple. Ground pine. (Bot.) See under Ground. Norfolk Island pine (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree, the Araucaria excelsa. Pine barren, a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines. [Southern U.S.] Pine borer (Zo["o]l.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into pine trees. Pine finch. (Zo["o]l.) See Pinefinch, in the Vocabulary. Pine grosbeak (Zo["o]l.), a large grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red. Pine lizard (Zo["o]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), native of the Middle States; -- called also swift, brown scorpion, and alligator. Pine marten. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European weasel (Mustela martes), called also sweet marten, and yellow-breasted marten. (b) The American sable. See Sable. Pine moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus Retinia, whose larv[ae] burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage. Pine mouse (Zo["o]l.), an American wild mouse (Arvicola pinetorum), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests. Pine needle (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See Pinus. Pine-needle wool. See Pine wool (below). Pine oil, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors. Pine snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless North American snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also bull snake. The Western pine snake (P. Sayi) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange. Pine tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Pinus; pine. Pine-tree money, money coined in Massachusetts in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. Pine weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of weevils whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to the genera Pissodes, Hylobius, etc. Pine wool, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic arts; -- called also pine-needle wool, and pine-wood wool.
Piscis Australis
Southern South"ern (?; 277), a. [AS. s??ern. See South.] Of or pertaining to the south; situated in, or proceeding from, the south; situated or proceeding toward the south. Southern Cross (Astron.), a constellation of the southern hemisphere containing several bright stars so related in position as to resemble a cross. Southern Fish (Astron.), a constelation of the southern hemisphere (Piscis Australis) containing the bright star Fomalhaut. Southern States (U.S. Hist. & Geog.), the States of the American Union lying south of Pennsylvania and the Ohio River, with Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas. Before the Civil War, Missouri also, being a slave State, was classed as one of the Southern States.
Struthio australis
Ostrich Os"trich, n. [OE. ostriche, ostrice, OF. ostruche, ostruce, F. autruche, L. avis struthio; avis bird + struthio ostrich, fr. Gr. ?, fr. ? bird, sparrow. Cf. Aviary, Struthious.] [Formerly written also estrich.] (Zo["o]l.) A large bird of the genus Struthio, of which Struthio camelus of Africa is the best known species. It has long and very strong legs, adapted for rapid running; only two toes; a long neck, nearly bare of feathers; and short wings incapable of flight. The adult male is about eight feet high. Note: The South African ostrich (Struthio australis) and the Asiatic ostrich are considered distinct species by some authors. Ostriches are now domesticated in South Africa in large numbers for the sake of their plumes. The body of the male is covered with elegant black plumose feathers, while the wings and tail furnish the most valuable white plumes. Ostrich farm, a farm on which ostriches are bred for the sake of their feathers, oil, eggs, etc. Ostrich farming, the occupation of breeding ostriches for the sake of their feathers, etc. Ostrich fern (Bot.) a kind of fern (Onoclea Struthiopteris), the tall fronds of which grow in a circle from the rootstock. It is found in alluvial soil in Europe and North America.
Synoicus australis
Quail Quail, n. [OF. quaille, F. caille, LL. quaquila, qualia, qualea, of Dutch or German origin; cf. D. kwakkel, kwartel, OHG. wahtala, G. wachtel.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any gallinaceous bird belonging to Coturnix and several allied genera of the Old World, especially the common European quail (C. communis), the rain quail (C. Coromandelica) of India, the stubble quail (C. pectoralis), and the Australian swamp quail (Synoicus australis). 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several American partridges belonging to Colinus, Callipepla, and allied genera, especially the bobwhite (called Virginia quail, and Maryland quail), and the California quail (Calipepla Californica). 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of Turnix and allied genera, native of the Old World, as the Australian painted quail (Turnix varius). See Turnix. 4. A prostitute; -- so called because the quail was thought to be a very amorous bird.[Obs.] --Shak. Bustard quail (Zo["o]l.), a small Asiatic quail-like bird of the genus Turnix, as T. taigoor, a black-breasted species, and the hill bustard quail (T. ocellatus). See Turnix. Button quail (Zo["o]l.), one of several small Asiatic species of Turnix, as T. Sykesii, which is said to be the smallest game bird of India. Mountain quail. See under Mountain. Quail call, a call or pipe for alluring quails into a net or within range. Quail dove (Zo["o]l.), any one of several American ground pigeons belonging to Geotrygon and allied genera. Quail hawk (Zo["o]l.), the New Zealand sparrow hawk (Hieracidea Nov[ae]-Hollandi[ae]). Quail pipe. See Quail call, above. Quail snipe (Zo["o]l.), the dowitcher, or red-breasted snipe; -- called also robin snipe, and brown snipe. Sea quail (Zo["o]l.), the turnstone. [Local, U. S.]

Meaning of Australis from wikipedia

- Australis (Latin for southern or of the south) may refer to: Alula Australis, a star system in the constellation Ursa Major Talitha Australis, a binary...
- uses the term Australis on his maps. Other names for the hypothetical continent have included Terra Australis Ignota, Terra Australis Incognita ("the...
- varieties of B. australis: Baptisia australis var. abberans Baptisia australis var. australis Baptisia australis var. minor B. australis is the most commonly...
- on M. australis. The substance Australone A can be found in M. australis. Zhengyi Wu, Zhe-Kun Zhou & Michael G. Gilbert (2013). "Morus australis". Flora...
- Alsophila australis, synonym Cyathea australis, also known as the rough tree fern, is a species of tree fern native to southeastern Queensland, New South...
- Cordyline australis, commonly known as the cabbage tree or cabbage-palm, is a widely branched monocot tree endemic to New Zealand. It grows up to 20 metres...
- Dryococelus australis, commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect or tree lobster, is a species of stick insect that lives on the Lord Howe Island...
- lights, northern lights (aurora borealis), or southern lights (aurora australis), is a natural light display in the Earth's sky, predominantly seen in...
- australis, commonly known as Asian copperleaf, is a species of flowering plant in the family Euphorbiaceae native to eastern Asia. Acalypha australis...
- C. australis, Fox-Amphoux, France, planted 1550 C. australis in Panchkhal VDC, Nepal Flower of C. australis C. australis autumn leaves C. australis Muntic...
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