Definition of Apostol. Meaning of Apostol. Synonyms of Apostol

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Definition of Apostol

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Apostolate
Apostolate A*pos"to*late, n. [L. apostolatus, fr. apostolus. See Apostle.] 1. The dignity, office, or mission, of an apostle; apostleship. Judas had miscarried and lost his apostolate. --Jer. Taylor. 2. The dignity or office of the pope, as the holder of the apostolic see.
Apostolic
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolic
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, n. [L. apostolicus.] (Eccl. Hist.) A member of one of certain ascetic sects which at various times professed to imitate the practice of the apostles.
Apostolic canons
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolic church
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolic constitutions
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolic delegate
Apostolic delegate Ap`os*tol"ic del"e*gate (R. C. Ch.) The diplomatic agent of the pope highest in grade, superior to a nuncio.
Apostolic father
Father Fa"ther, n. [OE. fader, AS. f[ae]der; akin to OS. fadar, D. vader, OHG. fatar, G. vater, Icel. Fa?ir Sw. & Dan. fader, OIr. athir, L. pater, Gr. ?????, Skr. pitr, perh. fr. Skr. p[=a] protect. ???,???. Cf. Papa, Paternal, Patriot, Potential, Pablum.] 1. One who has begotten a child, whether son or daughter; a generator; a male parent. A wise son maketh a glad father. --Prov. x. 1. 2. A male ancestor more remote than a parent; a progenitor; especially, a first ancestor; a founder of a race or family; -- in the plural, fathers, ancestors. David slept with his fathers. --1 Kings ii. 10. Abraham, who is the father of us all. --Rom. iv. 16. 3. One who performs the offices of a parent by maintenance, affetionate care, counsel, or protection. I was a father to the poor. --Job xxix. 16. He hath made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house. --Gen. xiv. 8. 4. A respectful mode of address to an old man. And Joash the king og Israel came down unto him [Elisha], . . . and said, O my father, my father! --2 Kings xiii. 14. 5. A senator of ancient Rome. 6. A dignitary of the church, a superior of a convent, a confessor (called also father confessor), or a priest; also, the eldest member of a profession, or of a legislative assembly, etc. Bless you, good father friar ! --Shak. 7. One of the chief esslesiastical authorities of the first centuries after Christ; -- often spoken of collectively as the Fathers; as, the Latin, Greek, or apostolic Fathers. 8. One who, or that which, gives origin; an originator; a producer, author, or contriver; the first to practice any art, profession, or occupation; a distinguished example or teacher. The father of all such as handle the harp and organ. --Gen. iv. 21. Might be the father, Harry, to that thought. --Shak. The father of good news. --Shak. 9. The Supreme Being and Creator; God; in theology, the first person in the Trinity. Our Father, which art in heaven. --Matt. vi. 9. Now had the almighty Father from above . . . Bent down his eye. --Milton. Adoptive father, one who adopts the child of another, treating it as his own. Apostolic father, Conscript fathers, etc. See under Apostolic, Conscript, etc. Father in God, a title given to bishops. Father of lies, the Devil. Father of the bar, the oldest practitioner at the bar. Fathers of the city, the aldermen. Father of the Faithful. (a) Abraham. --Rom. iv. --Gal. iii. 6-9. (b) Mohammed, or one of the sultans, his successors. Father of the house, the member of a legislative body who has had the longest continuous service. Most Reverend Father in God, a title given to archbishops and metropolitans, as to the archbishops of Canterbury and York. Natural father, the father of an illegitimate child. Putative father, one who is presumed to be the father of an illegitimate child; the supposed father. Spiritual father. (a) A religious teacher or guide, esp. one instrumental in leading a soul to God. (b) (R. C. Ch.) A priest who hears confession in the sacrament of penance. The Holy Father (R. C. Ch.), the pope.
Apostolic fathers
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolic king
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolic see
See See, n. [OE. se, see, OF. se, sed, sied, fr. L. sedes a seat, or the kindred sedere to sit. See Sit, and cf. Siege.] 1. A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Jove laughed on Venus from his sovereign see. --Spenser. 2. Specifically: (a) The seat of episcopal power; a diocese; the jurisdiction of a bishop; as, the see of New York. (b) The seat of an archibishop; a province or jurisdiction of an archibishop; as, an archiepiscopal see. (c) The seat, place, or office of the pope, or Roman pontiff; as, the papal see. (d) The pope or his court at Rome; as, to appeal to the see of Rome. Apostolic see. See under Apostolic.
Apostolic see
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolic vicar
Vicar Vic"ar, n. [OE. vicar, viker, vicair, F. vicaire, fr. L. vicarius. See Vicarious.] 1. One deputed or authorized to perform the functions of another; a substitute in office; a deputy. [R.] 2. (Eng. Eccl. Law) The incumbent of an appropriated benefice. Note: The distinction between a parson [or rector] and vicar is this: The parson has, for the most part, the whole right to the ecclesiastical dues in his parish; but a vicar has generally an appropriator over him, entitled to the best part of the profits, to whom he is in fact perpetual curate with a standing salary. --Burrill. Apostolic vicar, or Vicar apostolic. (R. C. Ch.) (a) A bishop to whom the Roman pontiff delegates a portion of his jurisdiction. (b) Any ecclesiastic acting under a papal brief, commissioned to exercise episcopal authority. (c) A titular bishop in a country where there is no episcopal see, or where the succession has been interrupted. Vicar forane. [Cf. LL. foraneus situated outside of the episcopal city, rural. See Vicar, and Foreign.] (R. C. Ch.) A dignitary or parish priest appointed by a bishop to exercise a limited jurisdiction in a particular town or district of a diocese. --Addis & Arnold. Vicar-general. (a) (Ch. of Eng.) The deputy of the Archbishop of Canterbury or York, in whose court the bishops of the province are confirmed. --Encyc. Brit. (b) (R. C. Ch.) An assistant to a bishop in the discharge of his official functions. Vicar of Jesus Christ (R. C. Ch.), the pope as representing Christ on earth.
Apostolical
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolical brief
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolical succession
Succession Suc*ces"sion, n. [L. successio: cf. F. succession. See Succeed.] 1. The act of succeeding, or following after; a following of things in order of time or place, or a series of things so following; sequence; as, a succession of good crops; a succession of disasters. 2. A series of persons or things according to some established rule of precedence; as, a succession of kings, or of bishops; a succession of events in chronology. He was in the succession to an earldom. --Macaulay. 3. An order or series of descendants; lineage; race; descent. ``A long succession must ensue.' --Milton. 4. The power or right of succeeding to the station or title of a father or other predecessor; the right to enter upon the office, rank, position, etc., held ny another; also, the entrance into the office, station, or rank of a predecessor; specifically, the succeeding, or right of succeeding, to a throne. You have the voice of the king himself for your succession in Denmark. --Shak. The animosity of these factions did not really arise from the dispute about the succession. --Macaulay. 5. The right to enter upon the possession of the property of an ancestor, or one near of kin, or one preceding in an established order. 6. The person succeeding to rank or office; a successor or heir. [R.] --Milton. Apostolical succession. (Theol.) See under Apostolical. Succession duty, a tax imposed on every succession to property, according to its value and the relation of the person who succeeds to the previous owner.
Apostolical succession
Apostolic Ap`os*tol"ic, Apostolical Ap`os*tol"ic*al, a. [L. apostolicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. apostolique.] 1. Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age. 2. According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice. 3. Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal. Apostolical brief. See under Brief. Apostolic canons, a collection of rules and precepts relating to the duty of Christians, and particularly to the ceremonies and discipline of the church in the second and third centuries. Apostolic church, the Christian church; -- so called on account of its apostolic foundation, doctrine, and order. The churches of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were called apostolic churches. Apostolic constitutions, directions of a nature similar to the apostolic canons, and perhaps compiled by the same authors or author. Apostolic fathers, early Christian writers, who were born in the first century, and thus touched on the age of the apostles. They were Polycarp, Clement, Ignatius, and Hermas; to these Barnabas has sometimes been added. Apostolic king (or majesty), a title granted by the pope to the kings of Hungary on account of the extensive propagation of Christianity by St. Stephen, the founder of the royal line. It is now a title of the emperor of Austria in right of the throne of Hungary. Apostolic see, a see founded and governed by an apostle; specifically, the Church of Rome; -- so called because, in the Roman Catholic belief, the pope is the successor of St. Peter, the prince of the apostles, and the only apostle who has successors in the apostolic office. Apostolical succession, the regular and uninterrupted transmission of ministerial authority by a succession of bishops from the apostles to any subsequent period. --Hook.
Apostolically
Apostolically Ap`os*tol"ic*al*ly, adv. In an apostolic manner.
Apostolicalness
Apostolicalness Ap`os*tol"ic*al*ness, n. Apostolicity. --Dr. H. More.
Apostolicism
Apostolicism Ap`os*tol"i*cism, Apostolicity A*pos`to*lic"i*ty, n. The state or quality of being apostolical.
Apostolicity
Apostolicism Ap`os*tol"i*cism, Apostolicity A*pos`to*lic"i*ty, n. The state or quality of being apostolical.
Isapostolic
Isapostolic Is*ap`os*tol"ic, a. [Gr. ?.] Having equal, or almost equal, authority with the apostles of their teachings.
Missionary apostolic
Missionary Mis"sion*ary, n.; pl. Missionaries. [Cf. F. missionnaire. See Mission, n.] One who is sent on a mission; especially, one sent to propagate religion. --Swift. Missionary apostolic, a Roman Catholic missionary sent by commission from the pope.
The Orthodox Catholic Apostolic Eastern Church
Eastern Church Eastern Church That portion of the Christian church which prevails in the countries once comprised in the Eastern Roman Empire and the countries converted to Christianity by missionaries from them. Its full official title is The Orthodox Catholic Apostolic Eastern Church. It became estranged from the Western, or Roman, Church over the question of papal supremacy and the doctrine of the filioque, and a separation, begun in the latter part of the 9th century, became final in 1054. The Eastern Church consists of twelve (thirteen if the Bulgarian Church be included) mutually independent churches (including among these the Hellenic Church, or Church of Greece, and the Russian Church), using the vernacular (or some ancient form of it) in divine service and varying in many points of detail, but standing in full communion with each other and united as equals in a great federation. The highest five authorities are the patriarch of Constantinople, or ecumenical patriarch (whose position is not one of supremacy, but of precedence), the patriarch of Alexandria, the patriarch of Jerusalem, the patriarch of Antioch, and the Holy Synod of Russia. The Eastern Church accepts the first seven ecumenical councils (and is hence styled only schismatic, not heretical, by the Roman Catholic Church), has as its creed the Niceno-Constantinopolitan (without the later addition of the filioque, which, with the doctrine it represents, the church decisively rejects), baptizes infants with trine immersion, makes confirmation follow immediately upon baptism, administers the Communion in both kinds (using leavened bread) and to infants as well as adults, permits its secular clergy to marry before ordination and to keep their wives afterward, but not to marry a second time, selects its bishops from the monastic clergy only, recognizes the offices of bishop, priest, and deacon as the three necessary degrees of orders, venerates relics and icons, and has an elaborate ritual.
Vicar apostolic
Vicar Vic"ar, n. [OE. vicar, viker, vicair, F. vicaire, fr. L. vicarius. See Vicarious.] 1. One deputed or authorized to perform the functions of another; a substitute in office; a deputy. [R.] 2. (Eng. Eccl. Law) The incumbent of an appropriated benefice. Note: The distinction between a parson [or rector] and vicar is this: The parson has, for the most part, the whole right to the ecclesiastical dues in his parish; but a vicar has generally an appropriator over him, entitled to the best part of the profits, to whom he is in fact perpetual curate with a standing salary. --Burrill. Apostolic vicar, or Vicar apostolic. (R. C. Ch.) (a) A bishop to whom the Roman pontiff delegates a portion of his jurisdiction. (b) Any ecclesiastic acting under a papal brief, commissioned to exercise episcopal authority. (c) A titular bishop in a country where there is no episcopal see, or where the succession has been interrupted. Vicar forane. [Cf. LL. foraneus situated outside of the episcopal city, rural. See Vicar, and Foreign.] (R. C. Ch.) A dignitary or parish priest appointed by a bishop to exercise a limited jurisdiction in a particular town or district of a diocese. --Addis & Arnold. Vicar-general. (a) (Ch. of Eng.) The deputy of the Archbishop of Canterbury or York, in whose court the bishops of the province are confirmed. --Encyc. Brit. (b) (R. C. Ch.) An assistant to a bishop in the discharge of his official functions. Vicar of Jesus Christ (R. C. Ch.), the pope as representing Christ on earth.

Meaning of Apostol from wikipedia

- name Apostol: Apostol Mărgărit (1832–1903), a Romanian school teacher and writer Apostol Muzac (born 1987), a Romanian football player Apostol Tnokovski...
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- Tom Mike Apostol (August 20, 1923 – May 8, 2016) was an American analytic number theorist and professor at the California Institute of Technology, best...
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- Strings (born William Apostol, October 3, 1992) is an American guitarist and bluegr**** musician. Billy Strings was born William Apostol on October 3, 1992...
- Apostol Tnokovski is a Macedonian product designer. His product design concepts are very inventive and unique. He often uses organic forms and the main...
- Danylo Apostol (Ukrainian: Данило Апостол) (1654–1734), was a Hetman of Zaporizhian Host from 1727 to 1734. Born in a Cossack family of Moldavian origin...
- Eugenia "Eggie" Apostol (born September 19, 1925) is a Filipino publisher who pla**** pivotal roles in the peaceful overthrow of two Philippine presidents:...
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