Definition of Apocope. Meaning of Apocope. Synonyms of Apocope

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Apocope. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Apocope and, of course, Apocope synonyms and on the right images related to the word Apocope.

Definition of Apocope

Apocope
Apocope A*poc"o*pe, n. [L., fr. Gr. ? a cutting off, fr. ? to cut off; ? from + ? to cut.] 1. The cutting off, or omission, of the last letter, syllable, or part of a word. 2. (Med.) A cutting off; abscission.

Meaning of Apocope from wikipedia

- In phonology, apocope (/əˈpɒkəpi/) is the loss (elision) of a word-final vowel. In a broader sense, it can refer to the loss of any final sound (including...
- Spanish adjectives are similar to those in most other Indo-European languages. They are generally postpositive, and they agree in both gender and number...
- Arnold [ru], clipping mainly consists of the following types: Final clipping or apocope Initial clipping, apheresis, or procope Medial clipping or syncope Complex...
- area, trøndersk, is characterized by dropping out most vowel endings; see apocope. Trøndelag is one of the most fertile regions of Norway, with large agricultural...
- adjacent to a consonant cluster or a final consonant. Apheresis (linguistics) Apocope Clipping (morphology) Clipping (phonetics) Deletion (phonology) Elision...
- to eliminate final consonants in Vulgar Latin, either by dropping them (apocope) or adding a vowel after them (epenthesis). Many final consonants were...
- dialect is, among other things, perhaps mostly characterized by the use of apocope, palatalization and the use of voiced retroflex flaps (thick L). Historically...
- ending there at all. This was caused by a sound change called high vowel apocope, which occurred in the prehistory of Old English. Short -i and -u disappeared...
- certain contexts, and may be reflected in spelling. More generally called n-apocope, it appears to varying extents in all dialects of the Western group of...
- sometimes jokingly pronounced "haplogy". Elision, aphaeresis, syncope, and apocope: all losses of sounds. Elision is the loss of unstressed sounds, aphaeresis...