Definition of Aphra. Meaning of Aphra. Synonyms of Aphra

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Definition of Aphra

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Cataphract
Cataphract Cat"a*phract, n. [L. cataphractes, Gr. ?, fr. ? covered, fr. ? to cover; kata` down, wholly + ? to inclose.] 1. (Mil. Antiq.) Defensive armor used for the whole body and often for the horse, also, esp. the linked mail or scale armor of some eastern nations. 2. A horseman covered with a cataphract. Archers and slingers, cataphracts, and spears. --Milton. 3. (Zo["o]l.) The armor or plate covering some fishes.
Cataphracted
Cataphracted Cat"a*phract`ed, a. (Zo["o]l.) Covered with a cataphract, or armor of plates, scales, etc.; or with that which corresponds to this, as horny or bony plates, hard, callous skin, etc.
Cataphractic
Cataphractic Cat`a*phrac"tic, a. Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a cataphract.
Chaldee Paraphrase
Chaldee Chal"dee, a. Of or pertaining to Chaldea. -- n. The language or dialect of the Chaldeans; eastern Aramaic, or the Aramaic used in Chaldea. Chaldee Paraphrase, A targum written in Aramaic.
Diaphragm
Diaphragm Di"a*phragm, n. [L. diaphragma, Gr. ?, fr. ? to fence by a partition wall; dia` through + ?, ?, to fence, inclose; prob. akin to L. fareire to stuff: cf. F. diaphragme. See Farce.] 1. A dividing membrane or thin partition, commonly with an opening through it. 2. (Anat.) The muscular and tendinous partition separating the cavity of the chest from that of the abdomen; the midriff. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A calcareous plate which divides the cavity of certain shells into two parts. 4. (Opt.) A plate with an opening, which is generally circular, used in instruments to cut off marginal portions of a beam of light, as at the focus of a telescope. 5. (Mach.) A partition in any compartment, for various purposes. Diaphragm pump, one in which a flexible diaphragm takes the place of a piston.
Diaphragm pump
Diaphragm Di"a*phragm, n. [L. diaphragma, Gr. ?, fr. ? to fence by a partition wall; dia` through + ?, ?, to fence, inclose; prob. akin to L. fareire to stuff: cf. F. diaphragme. See Farce.] 1. A dividing membrane or thin partition, commonly with an opening through it. 2. (Anat.) The muscular and tendinous partition separating the cavity of the chest from that of the abdomen; the midriff. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A calcareous plate which divides the cavity of certain shells into two parts. 4. (Opt.) A plate with an opening, which is generally circular, used in instruments to cut off marginal portions of a beam of light, as at the focus of a telescope. 5. (Mach.) A partition in any compartment, for various purposes. Diaphragm pump, one in which a flexible diaphragm takes the place of a piston.
Diaphragmatic
Diaphragmatic Di`a*phrag*mat"ic, a. [Cf. F. diaphragmatique.] Pertaining to a diaphragm; as, diaphragmatic respiration; the diaphragmatic arteries and nerves.
Gasterosteus cataphractus
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
Iris diaphragm
Iris diaphragm I"ris di"a*phragm An adjustable diaphragm, suggesting the iris of the eye in its action, for regulating the aperture of a lens, consisting of a number of thin pieces fastened to a ring. It is used in cameras and microscopes.
Metaphrased
Metaphrased Met"a*phrased, a. Translated literally.
Metaphrasis
Metaphrasis Me*taph"ra*sis, n. [NL. See Metaphrase.] Metaphrase.
Metaphrastic
Metaphrastic Met`a*phras"tic, Metaphrastical Met`a*phras"tic*al, a. [Gr. ?.] Close, or literal.
Metaphrastical
Metaphrastic Met`a*phras"tic, Metaphrastical Met`a*phras"tic*al, a. [Gr. ?.] Close, or literal.
Paraphragmal
Paraphagma Par`a*phag"ma, n.; pl. Paraphragmata. [NL., fr. Gr. ? beside + ?, ?, an inclosure.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the outer divisions of an endosternite of Crustacea. -- Par`a*phrag"mal, a.
Paraphragmata
Paraphagma Par`a*phag"ma, n.; pl. Paraphragmata. [NL., fr. Gr. ? beside + ?, ?, an inclosure.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the outer divisions of an endosternite of Crustacea. -- Par`a*phrag"mal, a.
Paraphrase
Paraphrase Par"a*phrase, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Paraphrased; p. pr. & vb. n. Paraphrasing.] To express, interpret, or translate with latitude; to give the meaning of a passage in other language. We are put to construe and paraphrase our own words. --Bp. Stillingfleet.
Paraphrase
Paraphrase Par"a*phrase, v. i. To make a paraphrase.
Paraphrased
Paraphrase Par"a*phrase, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Paraphrased; p. pr. & vb. n. Paraphrasing.] To express, interpret, or translate with latitude; to give the meaning of a passage in other language. We are put to construe and paraphrase our own words. --Bp. Stillingfleet.
Paraphraser
Paraphraser Par"a*phra`ser, n. One who paraphrases.
Paraphrasian
Paraphrasian Par`a*phra"sian, n. A paraphraser. [R.]
Paraphrasing
Paraphrase Par"a*phrase, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Paraphrased; p. pr. & vb. n. Paraphrasing.] To express, interpret, or translate with latitude; to give the meaning of a passage in other language. We are put to construe and paraphrase our own words. --Bp. Stillingfleet.
Paraphrast
Paraphrast Par"a*phrast, n. [L. paraphrastes, Gr. ?: cf. F. paraphraste.] A paraphraser. --T. Warton.
Paraphrastic
Paraphrastic Par`a*phras"tic, Paraphrastical Par`a*phras"tic*al, a. [Gr.?: cf. F. paraphrastique.] Paraphrasing; of the nature of paraphrase; explaining, or translating in words more clear and ample than those of the author; not literal; free. -- Par`a*phras"tic*al*ly, adv.
Paraphrastical
Paraphrastic Par`a*phras"tic, Paraphrastical Par`a*phras"tic*al, a. [Gr.?: cf. F. paraphrastique.] Paraphrasing; of the nature of paraphrase; explaining, or translating in words more clear and ample than those of the author; not literal; free. -- Par`a*phras"tic*al*ly, adv.
Paraphrastically
Paraphrastic Par`a*phras"tic, Paraphrastical Par`a*phras"tic*al, a. [Gr.?: cf. F. paraphrastique.] Paraphrasing; of the nature of paraphrase; explaining, or translating in words more clear and ample than those of the author; not literal; free. -- Par`a*phras"tic*al*ly, adv.
Peristethus cataphractum
Lyrie Ly"rie (l[imac]"r[i^]), n. [Icel. hl[=y]ri a sort of fish.] (Zo["o]l.) A European fish (Peristethus cataphractum), having the body covered with bony plates, and having three spines projecting in front of the nose; -- called also noble, pluck, pogge, sea poacher, and armed bullhead.

Meaning of Aphra from wikipedia

- Aphra Behn (/ˈæfrə bɛn/; bapt. 14 December 1640 – 16 April 1689) was an English playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era...
- Doctor C****i Lona Aphra is a fictional character in the Star Wars franchise. Created by writer Kieron Gillen and artist Salvador Larroca, she first appeared...
- Aphra is a genus of moths in the subfamily Arctiinae. The genus was described by Watson in 1980. Aphra flavicosta Herrich-Schäffer, 1855 Aphra nyctemeroides...
- Aphra nyctemeroides is a moth of the subfamily Arctiinae. It was described by Francis Walker in 1869. It found in Brazil. Savela, Markku. "Aphra nyctemeroides...
- Aphra trivittata is a moth of the subfamily Arctiinae. It was described by Francis Walker in 1854. It found in Brazil. Savela, Markku. "Aphra trivittata...
- Retrieved 20 October 2020. Shemza, Aphra. "AphraShemza". www.aphrashemza.com. Retrieved 20 October 2020. Shemza, Aphra (16 October 2015). "My grandfather...
- Aphra sanguipalpis is a moth of the subfamily Arctiinae. It was described by Paul Dognin in 1907. It found in Peru. Beccaloni, G.; Scoble, M.; Kitching...
- Aphra flavicosta is a moth of the subfamily Arctiinae. It was described by Gottlieb August Wilhelm Herrich-Schäffer in 1855. It found in Argentina. Beccaloni...
- Oroonoko: or, the Royal Slave is a short work of prose fiction by Aphra Behn (1640–1689), published in 1688 by William Canning and reissued with two other...
- and Aphra, a former government economist and now financial director of a veterinary business, and who is mother of their first grandchild, Kiyo. Aphra was...
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