Definition of Anche. Meaning of Anche. Synonyms of Anche

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Definition of Anche

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Avalanche
Avalanche Av"a*lanche` (?; 277), n. [F. avalanche, fr. avaler to descend, to let down, from aval down, downward; ? (L. ad) + val, L. vallis, valley. See Valley.] 1. A large mass or body of snow and ice sliding swiftly down a mountain side, or falling down a precipice. 2. A fall of earth, rocks, etc., similar to that of an avalanche of snow or ice. 3. A sudden, great, or irresistible descent or influx of anything.
Blanched
Blanch Blanch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Blanched; p. pr. & vb. n. Blanching.] [OE. blanchen, blaunchen, F. blanchir, fr. blanc white. See Blank, a.] 1. To take the color out of, and make white; to bleach; as, to blanch linen; age has blanched his hair. 2. (Gardening) To bleach by excluding the light, as the stalks or leaves of plants, by earthing them up or tying them together. 3. (Confectionery & Cookery) (a) To make white by removing the skin of, as by scalding; as, to blanch almonds. (b) To whiten, as the surface of meat, by plunging into boiling water and afterwards into cold, so as to harden the surface and retain the juices. 4. To give a white luster to (silver, before stamping, in the process of coining.). 5. To cover (sheet iron) with a coating of tin. 6. Fig.: To whiten; to give a favorable appearance to; to whitewash; to palliate. Blanch over the blackest and most absurd things. --Tillotson. Syn: To Blanch, Whiten. Usage: To whiten is the generic term, denoting, to render white; as, to whiten the walls of a room. Usually (though not of necessity) this is supposed to be done by placing some white coloring matter in or upon the surface of the object in question. To blanch is to whiten by the removal of coloring matter; as, to blanch linen. So the cheek is blanched by fear, i. e., by the withdrawal of the blood, which leaves it white.
Blancher
Blancher Blanch"er, n. One who, or that which, blanches or whitens; esp., one who anneals and cleanses money; also, a chemical preparation for this purpose.
Blancher
Blancher Blanch"er, n. One who, or that which, frightens away or turns aside. [Obs.] And Gynecia, a blancher, which kept the dearest deer from her. --Sir P. Sidney. And so even now hath he divers blanchers belonging to the market, to let and stop the light of the gospel. --Latimer.
Brancher
Brancher Branch"er, n. 1. That which shoots forth branches; one who shows growth in various directions. 2. (Falconry) A young hawk when it begins to leave the nest and take to the branches.
Branchery
Branchery Branch"er*y, n. A system of branches.
Branches
Branch Branch, n.; pl. Branches. [OE. braunche, F. branche, fr. LL. branca claw of a bird or beast of prey; cf. Armor. brank branch, bough.] 1. (Bot.) A shoot or secondary stem growing from the main stem, or from a principal limb or bough of a tree or other plant. 2. Any division extending like a branch; any arm or part connected with the main body of thing; ramification; as, the branch of an antler; the branch of a chandelier; a branch of a river; a branch of a railway. Most of the branches, or streams, were dried up. --W. Irving. 3. Any member or part of a body or system; a distinct article; a section or subdivision; a department. ``Branches of knowledge.' --Prescott. It is a branch and parcel of mine oath. --Shak. 4. (Geom.) One of the portions of a curve that extends outwards to an indefinitely great distance; as, the branches of an hyperbola. 5. A line of family descent, in distinction from some other line or lines from the same stock; any descendant in such a line; as, the English branch of a family. His father, a younger branch of the ancient stock. --Carew. 6. (Naut.) A warrant or commission given to a pilot, authorizing him to pilot vessels in certain waters. Branches of a bridle, two pieces of bent iron, which bear the bit, the cross chains, and the curb. Branch herring. See Alewife. Root and branch, totally, wholly. Syn: Bough; limb; shoot; offshoot; twig; sprig.
Branches of a bridle
Branch Branch, n.; pl. Branches. [OE. braunche, F. branche, fr. LL. branca claw of a bird or beast of prey; cf. Armor. brank branch, bough.] 1. (Bot.) A shoot or secondary stem growing from the main stem, or from a principal limb or bough of a tree or other plant. 2. Any division extending like a branch; any arm or part connected with the main body of thing; ramification; as, the branch of an antler; the branch of a chandelier; a branch of a river; a branch of a railway. Most of the branches, or streams, were dried up. --W. Irving. 3. Any member or part of a body or system; a distinct article; a section or subdivision; a department. ``Branches of knowledge.' --Prescott. It is a branch and parcel of mine oath. --Shak. 4. (Geom.) One of the portions of a curve that extends outwards to an indefinitely great distance; as, the branches of an hyperbola. 5. A line of family descent, in distinction from some other line or lines from the same stock; any descendant in such a line; as, the English branch of a family. His father, a younger branch of the ancient stock. --Carew. 6. (Naut.) A warrant or commission given to a pilot, authorizing him to pilot vessels in certain waters. Branches of a bridle, two pieces of bent iron, which bear the bit, the cross chains, and the curb. Branch herring. See Alewife. Root and branch, totally, wholly. Syn: Bough; limb; shoot; offshoot; twig; sprig.
Branches of a bridle
Bridle Bri"dle, n. [OE. bridel, AS. bridel; akin to OHG. britil, brittil, D. breidel, and possibly to E. braid. Cf. Bridoon.] 1. The head gear with which a horse is governed and restrained, consisting of a headstall, a bit, and reins, with other appendages. 2. A restraint; a curb; a check. --I. Watts. 3. (Gun.) The piece in the interior of a gun lock, which holds in place the tumbler, sear, etc. 4. (Naut.) (a) A span of rope, line, or chain made fast as both ends, so that another rope, line, or chain may be attached to its middle. (b) A mooring hawser. Bowline bridle. See under Bowline. Branches of a bridle. See under Branch. Bridle cable (Naut.), a cable which is bent to a bridle. See 4, above. Bridle hand, the hand which holds the bridle in riding; the left hand. Bridle path, Bridle way, a path or way for saddle horses and pack horses, as distinguished from a road for vehicles. Bridle port (Naut.), a porthole or opening in the bow through which hawsers, mooring or bridle cables, etc., are passed. Bridle rein, a rein attached to the bit. Bridle road. (a) Same as Bridle path. --Lowell. (b) A road in a pleasure park reserved for horseback exercise. Bridle track, a bridle path. Scolding bridle. See Branks, 2. Syn: A check; restrain.
Comanche
Comanches Co*man"ches (? or ?), n. pl.; sing. Comanche (? or ?). (Ethnol.) A warlike, savage, and nomadic tribe of the Shoshone family of Indians, inhabiting Mexico and the adjacent parts of the United States; -- called also Paducahs. They are noted for plundering and cruelty.
Comanches
Comanches Co*man"ches (? or ?), n. pl.; sing. Comanche (? or ?). (Ethnol.) A warlike, savage, and nomadic tribe of the Shoshone family of Indians, inhabiting Mexico and the adjacent parts of the United States; -- called also Paducahs. They are noted for plundering and cruelty.
Flanched
Flanched Flanched, a. (Her.) Having flanches; -- said of an escutcheon with those bearings.
Flanches
Flanch Flanch, n.; pl. Flanches. [Prov. E., a projection, OF. flanche flank. See Flank.] 1. A flange. [R.]. (Her.) A bearing consisting of a segment of a circle encroaching on the field from the side. Note: Flanches are always in pairs. A pair of flanches is considered one of the subordinaries.
Lanched
Lanch Lanch (l[.a]nch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Lanched (l[.a]ncht); p. pr. & vb. n. Lanching. See Launch, Lance.] To throw, as a lance; to let fly; to launch. See Whose arm can lanch the surer bolt. --Dryden & Lee.
Manche
Manche Manche, n. [Also maunch.] [F. manche, fr. L. manica. See Manacle.] A sleeve. [Obs.]
Manchester brown
Vesuvine Ve*su"vine, n. A trade name for a brown dyestuff obtained from certain basic azo compounds of benzene; -- called also Bismarck brown, Manchester brown, etc.
Manchet
Manchet Man"chet, n. Fine white bread; a loaf of fine bread. [Archaic] --Bacon. Tennyson.
Orobanche
Broom rape Broom" rape` (Bot.) A genus (Orobanche) of parasitic plants of Europe and Asia. They are destitute of chlorophyll, have scales instead of leaves, and spiked flowers, and grow attached to the roots of other plants, as furze, clover, flax, wild carrot, etc. The name is sometimes applied to other plants related to this genus, as Aphyllon uniflorumand A. Ludovicianum.
Planched
Planch Planch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Planched; p. pr. & vb. n. Planching.] [F. planche a board, plank. See Plank.] To make or cover with planks or boards; to plank. [Obs.] ``To that vineyard is a planched gate.' --Shak.
Plancher
Plancher Planch"er, n. [F., planche. See Planch.] 1. A floor of wood; also, a plank. [Obs.] --Bacon. 2. (Arch.) The under side of a cornice; a soffit.
Plancher
Plancher Planch"er, v. t. To form of planks. [Obs.] --Golding.
Planchet
Planchet Planch"et, n. [F. planchette a small board, dim. of planche. See Planch.] A flat piece of metal; especially, a disk of metal ready to be stamped as a coin.
Planchette
Planchette Plan`chette", n. [F. See Planchet.] 1. A circumferentor. See Circumferentor. 2. A small tablet of wood supported on casters and having a pencil attached. The characters produced by the pencil on paper, while the hand rests on the instrument and it is allowed to move, are sometimes translated as of oracular or supernatural import.
Pomme blanche
Pomme blanche Pomme` blanche" [F., literally, white apple.] The prairie turnip. See under Prairie.
pomme blanche
Prairie Prai"rie, n. [F., an extensive meadow, OF. praerie, LL. prataria, fr. L. pratum a meadow.] 1. An extensive tract of level or rolling land, destitute of trees, covered with coarse grass, and usually characterized by a deep, fertile soil. They abound throughout the Mississippi valley, between the Alleghanies and the Rocky mountains. From the forests and the prairies, From the great lakes of the northland. --Longfellow. 2. A meadow or tract of grass; especially, a so called natural meadow. Prairie chicken (Zo["o]l.), any American grouse of the genus Tympanuchus, especially T. Americanus (formerly T. cupido), which inhabits the prairies of the central United States. Applied also to the sharp-tailed grouse. Prairie clover (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Petalostemon, having small rosy or white flowers in dense terminal heads or spikes. Several species occur in the prairies of the United States. Prairie dock (Bot.), a coarse composite plant (Silphium terebinthaceum) with large rough leaves and yellow flowers, found in the Western prairies. Prairie dog (Zo["o]l.), a small American rodent (Cynomys Ludovicianus) allied to the marmots. It inhabits the plains west of the Mississippi. The prairie dogs burrow in the ground in large warrens, and have a sharp bark like that of a dog. Called also prairie marmot. Prairie grouse. Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie hare (Zo["o]l.), a large long-eared Western hare (Lepus campestris). See Jack rabbit, under 2d Jack. Prairie hawk, Prairie falcon (Zo["o]l.), a falcon of Western North America (Falco Mexicanus). The upper parts are brown. The tail has transverse bands of white; the under parts, longitudinal streaks and spots of brown. Prairie hen. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie itch (Med.), an affection of the skin attended with intense itching, which is observed in the Northern and Western United States; -- also called swamp itch, winter itch. Prairie marmot. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie dog, above. Prairie mole (Zo["o]l.), a large American mole (Scalops argentatus), native of the Western prairies. Prairie pigeon, plover, or snipe (Zo["o]l.), the upland plover. See Plover, n., 2. Prairie rattlesnake (Zo["o]l.), the massasauga. Prairie snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless American snake (Masticophis flavigularis). It is pale yellow, tinged with brown above. Prairie squirrel (Zo["o]l.), any American ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus, inhabiting prairies; -- called also gopher. Prairie turnip (Bot.), the edible turnip-shaped farinaceous root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta) of the Upper Missouri region; also, the plant itself. Called also pomme blanche, and pomme de prairie. Prairie warbler (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored American warbler (Dendroica discolor). The back is olive yellow, with a group of reddish spots in the middle; the under parts and the parts around the eyes are bright yellow; the sides of the throat and spots along the sides, black; three outer tail feathers partly white. Prairie wolf. (Zo["o]l.) See Coyote.
Rancheria
Rancheria Ran`che*ri"a, n. [Sp. rancheria.] 1. A dwelling place of a ranchero. 2. A small settlement or collection of ranchos, or rude huts, esp. for Indians. [Sp. Amer. & Southern U. S.] 3. Formerly, in the Philippines, a political division of the pagan tribes.
Ranchero
Ranchero Ran*che"ro, n.; pl. Rancheros. [Sp.] [Mexico & Western U. S.] 1. A herdsman; a peasant employed on a ranch or rancho. 2. The owner and occupant of a ranch or rancho.
Rancheros
Ranchero Ran*che"ro, n.; pl. Rancheros. [Sp.] [Mexico & Western U. S.] 1. A herdsman; a peasant employed on a ranch or rancho. 2. The owner and occupant of a ranch or rancho.
Scranched
Scranch Scranch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scranched; p. pr. & vb. n. Scranching.] [Cf. D. schransen to eat greedily, G. schranzen. Cf. Crunch, Scrunch.] To grind with the teeth, and with a crackling sound; to craunch. [Prov. Eng. & Colloq. U. S.]
Stanchel
Stanchel Stan"chel, n. A stanchion.

Meaning of Anche from wikipedia

- Anché is the name of the following communes in France: Anché, Indre-et-Loire, in the Indre-et-Loir department Anché, Vienne, in the Vienne department...
- Mic****e Anches (? – 1926) was a woman who claimed to be the Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia. In 1925, Anches headed to Denmark to meet with...
- 0–0: batosta europea Portoghesi in finale, bianconeri eliminati. Battaglia anche nel dopopartita" (in Italian). Il Messaggero. Archived from the original...
- Retrieved 6 July 2015. "Hall of fame, 10 new entry: con Vialli e Mancini anche Facchetti e Ronaldo" [Hall of fame, 10 new entries: with Vialli and Mancini...
- Along the Ridge (Italian: Anche libero va bene) is a 2006 Italian film directed by Kim Rossi Stuart, who also wrote the screenplay in collaboration with...
- Retrieved 22 August 2016. "Wanda Nara: "Non ho mai tradito Maxi. Lui invece anche con la governante"". Retrieved 22 August 2016. Bandini, Paolo (14 April...
- Pearl Days. The ballad is also written in Italian language, as "Una poesia anche per te", but its lyrics aren't the "Life Goes On" translation. The song...
- Even Angels Eat Beans (Italian: Anche gli angeli mangiano ****ioli) is a 1973 Italian action comedy film written and directed by Enzo Barboni with Giuliano...
- B. Retrieved 19 August 2018. "Roman Macek vestirà bianconero, in arrivo anche Cavagnera" [Roman Macek will wear black-and-white, Cavagnera will join as...
- towards politics of a friendly state. The B-side of the single is "Se perdo anche te", a cover of Neil Diamond's "Solitary Man". Both songs are arranged by...
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