Definition of Amercement. Meaning of Amercement. Synonyms of Amercement

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Amercement. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Amercement and, of course, Amercement synonyms and on the right images related to the word Amercement.

Definition of Amercement

Amercement
Amercement A*merce"ment, n. [OF. amerciment.] The infliction of a penalty at the discretion of the court; also, a mulct or penalty thus imposed. It differs from a fine,in that the latter is, or was originally, a fixed and certain sum prescribed by statue for an offense; but an amercement is arbitrary. Hence, the act or practice of affeering. [See Affeer.] --Blackstone. Note: This word, in old books, is written amerciament. Amercement royal, a penalty imposed on an officer for a misdemeanor in his office. --Jacobs.

Meaning of Amercement from wikipedia

- An amercement is a financial penalty in English law, common during the Middle Ages, imposed either by the court or by peers. The noun "amercement" lately...
- punishes such behaviour with a fine in the case of a neighbour but with amercement in the case of a lord doing so with his tenant. It also requires that...
- business of a county court should be dealt with. Y 20 Stated that an amercement, a type of medieval fine, should be proportionate to the offence, but...
- called demesne; other income came from imposing legal fines and arbitrary amercements, and from taxes, which at this time were raised only intermittently....
- closed. The appellant's surety will be transformed to a fine. Money portal Amercement ****et forfeiture — in which the results of a crime and items used in a...
- has been expanded to target ordinary citizens. In latter-day practice, amercements may include partial (Jang) or full seizure (Lloydsmith, Rai) of a house...
- pain not only to incur our indignation, but also to pay such pains and amercements and also to suffer imprisonment and other pains due to the transgressors...
- arbitrary recurring fees, and fines and punishments for lawbreakers (see amercement). In rural areas, the statute was enforced by manorial lords, who held...
- grain prices laid down by the ****izes. Penalties for breach included amercements, pillory and tumbrel. A 14th century statute labelled forestallers as...
- trimer, trimerize merc- reward, wages, hire Latin merx (genitive mercis) amercement, commerce, commercial, market, mercantile, mercenary, mercery, merchandise...
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