Definition of Allin. Meaning of Allin. Synonyms of Allin

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Definition of Allin

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Allineate
Allineate Al*lin"e*ate, v. t. [L. ad + lineatus, p. p. of lineare to draw a line.] To align. [R.] --Herschel.
Allineation
Allineation Al*lin`e*a"tion, Alineation A*lin`e*a"tion, n. Alignment; position in a straight line, as of two planets with the sun. --Whewell. The allineation of the two planets. --C. A. Young.
Appalling
Appalling Ap*pall"ing, a. Such as to appall; as, an appalling accident. -- Ap*pall"ing*ly, adv.
Appalling
Appall Ap*pall", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Appalled; p. pr. & vb. n. Appalling.] [OF. appalir to grow pale, make pale; a (L. ad) + p[^a]lir to grow pale, to make pale, p[^a]le pale. See Pale, a., and cf. Pall.] 1. To make pale; to blanch. [Obs.] The answer that ye made to me, my dear, . . . Hath so appalled my countenance. --Wyatt. 2. To weaken; to enfeeble; to reduce; as, an old appalled wight. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Wine, of its own nature, will not congeal and freeze, only it will lose the strength, and become appalled in extremity of cold. --Holland. 3. To depress or discourage with fear; to impress with fear in such a manner that the mind shrinks, or loses its firmness; to overcome with sudden terror or horror; to dismay; as, the sight appalled the stoutest heart. The house of peers was somewhat appalled at this alarum. --Clarendon. Syn: To dismay; terrify; daunt; frighten; affright; scare; depress. See Dismay.
Appallingly
Appalling Ap*pall"ing, a. Such as to appall; as, an appalling accident. -- Ap*pall"ing*ly, adv.
Balling
Ball Ball, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Balled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Balling.] To gather balls which cling to the feet, as of damp snow or clay; to gather into balls; as, the horse balls; the snow balls.
Befalling
Befall Be*fall", v. t. [imp. Befell; p. p. Befallen; p. pr. & vb. n. Befalling.] [AS. befeallan; pref. be- + feallan to fall.] To happen to. I beseech your grace that I may know The worst that may befall me. --Shak.
Blackballing
Blackball Black"ball`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Blackballed; p. pr. & vb. n. Blackballing.] 1. To vote against, by putting a black ball into a ballot box; to reject or exclude, as by voting against with black balls; to ostracize. He was blackballed at two clubs in succession. --Thackeray. 2. To blacken (leather, shoes, etc.) with blacking.
Caballine
Caballine Cab"al*line (k[a^]b"al*l[imac]n), a. [L. caballinus, fr. caballus a nag. Cf. Cavalier.] Of or pertaining to a horse. -- n. Caballine aloes. Caballine aloes, an inferior and impure kind of aloes formerly used in veterinary practice; -- called also horse aloes. Caballine spring, the fountain of Hippocrene, on Mount Helicon; -- fabled to have been formed by a stroke from the foot of the winged horse Pegasus.
Caballine aloes
Caballine Cab"al*line (k[a^]b"al*l[imac]n), a. [L. caballinus, fr. caballus a nag. Cf. Cavalier.] Of or pertaining to a horse. -- n. Caballine aloes. Caballine aloes, an inferior and impure kind of aloes formerly used in veterinary practice; -- called also horse aloes. Caballine spring, the fountain of Hippocrene, on Mount Helicon; -- fabled to have been formed by a stroke from the foot of the winged horse Pegasus.
Caballine spring
Caballine Cab"al*line (k[a^]b"al*l[imac]n), a. [L. caballinus, fr. caballus a nag. Cf. Cavalier.] Of or pertaining to a horse. -- n. Caballine aloes. Caballine aloes, an inferior and impure kind of aloes formerly used in veterinary practice; -- called also horse aloes. Caballine spring, the fountain of Hippocrene, on Mount Helicon; -- fabled to have been formed by a stroke from the foot of the winged horse Pegasus.
Caballing
Cabal Ca*bal", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Caballed (-b[a^]ld"); p. pr. & vb. n. Caballing]. [Cf. F. cabaler.] To unite in a small party to promote private views and interests by intrigue; to intrigue; to plot. Caballing still against it with the great. --Dryden.
calling crab
Fiddler Fid"dler, n. [AS. fi?elere.] 1. One who plays on a fiddle or violin. 2. (Zo["o]l.) A burrowing crab of the genus Gelasimus, of many species. The male has one claw very much enlarged, and often holds it in a position similar to that in which a musician holds a fiddle, hence the name; -- called also calling crab, soldier crab, and fighting crab. 3. (Zo["o]l.) The common European sandpiper (Tringoides hypoleucus); -- so called because it continually oscillates its body. Fiddler crab. (Zo["o]l.) See Fiddler, n., 2.
calling hare
Pika Pi"ka, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of rodents of the genus Lagomys, resembling small tailless rabbits. They inhabit the high mountains of Asia and America. Called also calling hare, and crying hare. See Chief hare.
calling hare
Chief hare Chief" hare` (Zo["o]l.) A small rodent (Lagamys princeps) inhabiting the summits of the Rocky Mountains; -- also called crying hare, calling hare, cony, American pika, and little chief hare. Note: It is not a true hare or rabbit, but belongs to the curious family Lagomyid[ae].
corallin
Rosolic Ro*sol"ic, a. [Rose + carbolic.] (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex red dyestuff (called rosolic acid) which is analogous to rosaniline and aurin. It is produced by oxidizing a mixture of phenol and cresol, as a dark red amorphous mass, C20H16O3, which forms weak salts with bases, and stable ones with acids. Called also methyl aurin, and, formerly, corallin.
Corallin
Corallin Cor"al*lin, n. [So named in allusion to the color of red corallin, fr. L. corallum coral.] (Chem.) A yellow coal-tar dyestuff which probably consists chiefly of rosolic acid. See Aurin, and Rosolic acid under Rosolic. Red corallin, a red dyestuff which is obtained by treating aurin or rosolic acid with ammonia; -- called also p[ae]onin. Yellow corallin. See Aurin.
Coralline
Coralline Cor"al*line (? or ?), a. [Cf. L. corallinus coralred.] Composed of corallines; as, coralline limestone.
Coralline
Coralline Cor"al*line, n. [Cf. F. coralline.] 1. (Bot.) A submarine, semicalcareous or calcareous plant, consisting of many jointed branches. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Formerly any slender coral-like animal; -- sometimes applied more particulary to bryozoan corals.
Corallinite
Corallinite Cor"al*lin*ite, n. (Paleon.) A fossil coralline.
Corralling
Corral Cor*ral", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Corraled (-r?ld" or -r?ld"); p. pr. & vb. n. Corralling.] To surround and inclose; to coop up; to put into an inclosed space; -- primarily used with reference to securing horses and cattle in an inclosure of wagons while traversing the plains, but in the Southwestern United States now colloquially applied to the capturing, securing, or penning of anything. --Bartlett.
Cryptocrystalline
Cryptocrystalline Cryp`to*crys"tal*line (-kr?s"tal-l?n), a. [Gr. krypto`s hidden + E. crystalline.] (Geol.) Indistinctly crystalline; -- applied to rocks and minerals, whose state of aggregation is so fine that no distinct particles are visible, even under the microscope.
Crystallin
Crystallin Crys"tal*lin (-l?n), n. (Physiol. Chem.) See Gobulin.
Crystalline
Crystalline Crys"tal*line (kr?s"tal-l?n or -l?n; 277), a. [L. crystallinus, from Gr. ????: cf. F. cristallin. See Crystal.] 1. Consisting, or made, of crystal. Mount, eagle, to my palace crystalline. --Shak. 2. Formed by crystallization; like crystal in texture. Their crystalline structure. --Whewell. 3. Imperfectly crystallized; as, granite is only crystalline, while quartz crystal is perfectly crystallized. 4. Fig.: Resembling crystal; pure; transparent; pellucid. ``The crystalline sky.' --Milton. Crystalline heavens, or Crystalline spheres, in the Ptolemaic system of astronomy, two transparent spheres imagined to exist between the region of the fixed stars and the primum mobile (or outer circle of the heavens, which by its motion was supposed to carry round all those within it), in order to explain certain movements of the heavenly bodies. Crystalline lens (Anat.), the capsular lenslike body in the eye, serving to focus the rays of light. It consists of rodlike cells derived from the external embryonic epithelium.
Crystalline
Crystalline Crys"tal*line, n. 1. A crystalline substance. 2. See Aniline. [Obs.]
Crystalline heavens
Crystalline Crys"tal*line (kr?s"tal-l?n or -l?n; 277), a. [L. crystallinus, from Gr. ????: cf. F. cristallin. See Crystal.] 1. Consisting, or made, of crystal. Mount, eagle, to my palace crystalline. --Shak. 2. Formed by crystallization; like crystal in texture. Their crystalline structure. --Whewell. 3. Imperfectly crystallized; as, granite is only crystalline, while quartz crystal is perfectly crystallized. 4. Fig.: Resembling crystal; pure; transparent; pellucid. ``The crystalline sky.' --Milton. Crystalline heavens, or Crystalline spheres, in the Ptolemaic system of astronomy, two transparent spheres imagined to exist between the region of the fixed stars and the primum mobile (or outer circle of the heavens, which by its motion was supposed to carry round all those within it), in order to explain certain movements of the heavenly bodies. Crystalline lens (Anat.), the capsular lenslike body in the eye, serving to focus the rays of light. It consists of rodlike cells derived from the external embryonic epithelium.
Crystalline lens
Lens Lens (l[e^]nz), n.; pl. Lenses (-[e^]z). [L. lens a lentil. So named from the resemblance in shape of a double convex lens to the seed of a lentil. Cf. Lentil.] (Opt.) A piece of glass, or other transparent substance, ground with two opposite regular surfaces, either both curved, or one curved and the other plane, and commonly used, either singly or combined, in optical instruments, for changing the direction of rays of light, and thus magnifying objects, or otherwise modifying vision. In practice, the curved surfaces are usually spherical, though rarely cylindrical, or of some other figure. Lenses Note: Of spherical lenses, there are six varieties, as shown in section in the figures herewith given: viz., a plano-concave; b double-concave; c plano-convex; d double-convex; e converging concavo-convex, or converging meniscus; f diverging concavo-convex, or diverging meniscus. Crossed lens (Opt.), a double-convex lens with one radius equal to six times the other. Crystalline lens. (Anat.) See Eye. Fresnel lens (Opt.), a compound lens formed by placing around a central convex lens rings of glass so curved as to have the same focus; used, especially in lighthouses, for concentrating light in a particular direction; -- so called from the inventor. Multiplying lens or glass (Opt.), a lens one side of which is plane and the other convex, but made up of a number of plane faces inclined to one another, each of which presents a separate image of the object viewed through it, so that the object is, as it were, multiplied. Polyzonal lens. See Polyzonal.
Crystalline lens
Crystalline Crys"tal*line (kr?s"tal-l?n or -l?n; 277), a. [L. crystallinus, from Gr. ????: cf. F. cristallin. See Crystal.] 1. Consisting, or made, of crystal. Mount, eagle, to my palace crystalline. --Shak. 2. Formed by crystallization; like crystal in texture. Their crystalline structure. --Whewell. 3. Imperfectly crystallized; as, granite is only crystalline, while quartz crystal is perfectly crystallized. 4. Fig.: Resembling crystal; pure; transparent; pellucid. ``The crystalline sky.' --Milton. Crystalline heavens, or Crystalline spheres, in the Ptolemaic system of astronomy, two transparent spheres imagined to exist between the region of the fixed stars and the primum mobile (or outer circle of the heavens, which by its motion was supposed to carry round all those within it), in order to explain certain movements of the heavenly bodies. Crystalline lens (Anat.), the capsular lenslike body in the eye, serving to focus the rays of light. It consists of rodlike cells derived from the external embryonic epithelium.
Crystalline spheres
Crystalline Crys"tal*line (kr?s"tal-l?n or -l?n; 277), a. [L. crystallinus, from Gr. ????: cf. F. cristallin. See Crystal.] 1. Consisting, or made, of crystal. Mount, eagle, to my palace crystalline. --Shak. 2. Formed by crystallization; like crystal in texture. Their crystalline structure. --Whewell. 3. Imperfectly crystallized; as, granite is only crystalline, while quartz crystal is perfectly crystallized. 4. Fig.: Resembling crystal; pure; transparent; pellucid. ``The crystalline sky.' --Milton. Crystalline heavens, or Crystalline spheres, in the Ptolemaic system of astronomy, two transparent spheres imagined to exist between the region of the fixed stars and the primum mobile (or outer circle of the heavens, which by its motion was supposed to carry round all those within it), in order to explain certain movements of the heavenly bodies. Crystalline lens (Anat.), the capsular lenslike body in the eye, serving to focus the rays of light. It consists of rodlike cells derived from the external embryonic epithelium.
Dialling
Dial Di"al, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dialedor Dialled; p. pr. & vb. n. Dialing or Dialling.] 1. To measure with a dial. Hours of that true time which is dialed in heaven. --Talfourd. 2. (Mining) To survey with a dial. --Raymond.

Meaning of Allin from wikipedia

- Kevin Michael "GG" Allin (born Jesus Christ Allin; August 29, 1956 – June 28, 1993) was an American punk rock singer-songwriter who performed and recorded...
- wrestler currently signed to All Elite Wrestling (AEW) under the name Darby Allin. He is also known for his appearances in World Wrestling Network promotions...
- Allin is both a surname and a given name. Notable people with the name include: Surname: Buddy Allin (1944–2007), American golfer GG Allin (1956–1993)...
- Rosena Chantelle Allin-Khan (born 1977) is a British politician and doctor who has served as Member of Parliament (MP) for Tooting since the 2016 by-election...
- Colby Allin, Jr. (born April 9th, 1953) is an American professional b****ist. He is the elder brother of the late punk rock singer/songwriter GG Allin. Allin...
- Hated: GG Allin and the Murder Junkies is a 1993 do****entary film directed by Todd Phillips. The film is about the life of GG Allin, a punk rock musician...
- rock band, best known for having been GG Allin's final backing band before his death. They perform songs from Allin's back catalog as well as their own original...
- on 30 November 1866. Born in 1780, James Allin was the son of John Allin, a merchant of Youghal. James Allin bequeathed the building to a group of trustees...
- Thomas Allin (1757–1833) was a Kentucky politician. Thomas Allin may also refer to: Thomas Allin (Methodist) (1784–1866), English Methodist Thomas Allin (Anglican)...
- The GG Allin discography lists the albums, EPs, and singles released since 1978. GG Allin & The Jabbers - "Bored To Death/Beat, Beat, Beat/One Man Army"...
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