Definition of one. Meaning of one. Synonyms of one

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Definition of one

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After one
One One, n. 1. A single unit; as, one is the base of all numbers. 2. A symbol representing a unit, as 1, or i. 3. A single person or thing. ``The shining ones.' --Bunyan. ``Hence, with your little ones.' --Shak. He will hate the one, and love the other. --Matt. vi. 24. That we may sit, one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left hand, in thy glory. --Mark x. 37. After one, after one fashion; alike. [Obs.] --Chaucer. At one, in agreement or concord. See At one, in the Vocab. Ever in one, continually; perpetually; always. [Obs.] --Chaucer. In one, in union; in a single whole. One and one, One by one, singly; one at a time; one after another. ``Raising one by one the suppliant crew.' --Dryden.
All one
One One, a. [OE. one, on, an, AS. ["a]n; akin to D. een, OS. ["e]n, OFries. ["e]n, ["a]n, G. ein, Dan. een, Sw. en, Icel. einn, Goth. ains, W. un, Ir. & Gael. aon, L. unus, earlier oinos, oenos, Gr. ? the ace on dice; cf. Skr. ["e]ka. The same word as the indefinite article a, an. [root] 299. Cf. 2d A, 1st An, Alone, Anon, Any, None, Nonce, Only, Onion, Unit.] 1. Being a single unit, or entire being or thing, and no more; not multifold; single; individual. The dream of Pharaoh is one. --Gen. xli. 25. O that we now had here But one ten thousand of those men in England. --Shak. 2. Denoting a person or thing conceived or spoken of indefinitely; a certain. ``I am the sister of one Claudio' [--Shak.], that is, of a certain man named Claudio. 3. Pointing out a contrast, or denoting a particular thing or person different from some other specified; -- used as a correlative adjective, with or without the. From the one side of heaven unto the other. --Deut. iv. 32. 4. Closely bound together; undivided; united; constituting a whole. The church is therefore one, though the members may be many. --Bp. Pearson 5. Single in kind; the same; a common. One plague was on you all, and on your lords. --1 Sam. vi. 4. 6. Single; inmarried. [Obs.] Men may counsel a woman to be one. --Chaucer. Note: One is often used in forming compound words, the meaning of which is obvious; as, one-armed, one-celled, one-eyed, one-handed, one-hearted, one-horned, one-idead, one-leaved, one-masted, one-ribbed, one-story, one-syllable, one-stringed, one-winged, etc. All one, of the same or equal nature, or consequence; as, he says that it is all one what course you take. --Shak.
All one
Note: In the ancient phrases, all too dear, all too much, all so long, etc., this word retains its appropriate sense or becomes intensive. 2. Even; just. (Often a mere intensive adjunct.) [Obs. or Poet.] All as his straying flock he fed. --Spenser. A damsel lay deploring All on a rock reclined. --Gay. All to, or All-to. In such phrases as ``all to rent,' ``all to break,' ``all-to frozen,' etc., which are of frequent occurrence in our old authors, the all and the to have commonly been regarded as forming a compound adverb, equivalent in meaning to entirely, completely, altogether. But the sense of entireness lies wholly in the word all (as it does in ``all forlorn,' and similar expressions), and the to properly belongs to the following word, being a kind of intensive prefix (orig. meaning asunder and answering to the LG. ter-, HG. zer-). It is frequently to be met with in old books, used without the all. Thus Wyclif says, ``The vail of the temple was to rent:' and of Judas, ``He was hanged and to-burst the middle:' i. e., burst in two, or asunder. All along. See under Along. All and some, individually and collectively, one and all. [Obs.] ``Displeased all and some.' --Fairfax. All but. (a) Scarcely; not even. [Obs.] --Shak. (b) Almost; nearly. ``The fine arts were all but proscribed.' --Macaulay. All hollow, entirely, completely; as, to beat any one all hollow. [Low] All one, the same thing in effect; that is, wholly the same thing. All over, over the whole extent; thoroughly; wholly; as, she is her mother all over. [Colloq.] All the better, wholly the better; that is, better by the whole difference. All the same, nevertheless. ``There they [certain phenomena] remain rooted all the same, whether we recognize them or not.' --J. C. Shairp. ``But Rugby is a very nice place all the same.' --T. Arnold. -- See also under All, n.
At one
One One, n. 1. A single unit; as, one is the base of all numbers. 2. A symbol representing a unit, as 1, or i. 3. A single person or thing. ``The shining ones.' --Bunyan. ``Hence, with your little ones.' --Shak. He will hate the one, and love the other. --Matt. vi. 24. That we may sit, one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left hand, in thy glory. --Mark x. 37. After one, after one fashion; alike. [Obs.] --Chaucer. At one, in agreement or concord. See At one, in the Vocab. Ever in one, continually; perpetually; always. [Obs.] --Chaucer. In one, in union; in a single whole. One and one, One by one, singly; one at a time; one after another. ``Raising one by one the suppliant crew.' --Dryden.
At one
At one At one" [OE. at on, atone, atoon, attone.] 1. In concord or friendship; in agreement (with each other); as, to be, bring, make, or set, at one, i. e., to be or bring in or to a state of agreement or reconciliation. If gentil men, or othere of hir contree Were wrothe, she wolde bringen hem atoon. --Chaucer. 2. Of the same opinion; agreed; as, on these points we are at one. 3. Together. [Obs.] --Spenser.
Ever in one
One One, n. 1. A single unit; as, one is the base of all numbers. 2. A symbol representing a unit, as 1, or i. 3. A single person or thing. ``The shining ones.' --Bunyan. ``Hence, with your little ones.' --Shak. He will hate the one, and love the other. --Matt. vi. 24. That we may sit, one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left hand, in thy glory. --Mark x. 37. After one, after one fashion; alike. [Obs.] --Chaucer. At one, in agreement or concord. See At one, in the Vocab. Ever in one, continually; perpetually; always. [Obs.] --Chaucer. In one, in union; in a single whole. One and one, One by one, singly; one at a time; one after another. ``Raising one by one the suppliant crew.' --Dryden.
In one
One One, n. 1. A single unit; as, one is the base of all numbers. 2. A symbol representing a unit, as 1, or i. 3. A single person or thing. ``The shining ones.' --Bunyan. ``Hence, with your little ones.' --Shak. He will hate the one, and love the other. --Matt. vi. 24. That we may sit, one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left hand, in thy glory. --Mark x. 37. After one, after one fashion; alike. [Obs.] --Chaucer. At one, in agreement or concord. See At one, in the Vocab. Ever in one, continually; perpetually; always. [Obs.] --Chaucer. In one, in union; in a single whole. One and one, One by one, singly; one at a time; one after another. ``Raising one by one the suppliant crew.' --Dryden.
One and one
One One, n. 1. A single unit; as, one is the base of all numbers. 2. A symbol representing a unit, as 1, or i. 3. A single person or thing. ``The shining ones.' --Bunyan. ``Hence, with your little ones.' --Shak. He will hate the one, and love the other. --Matt. vi. 24. That we may sit, one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left hand, in thy glory. --Mark x. 37. After one, after one fashion; alike. [Obs.] --Chaucer. At one, in agreement or concord. See At one, in the Vocab. Ever in one, continually; perpetually; always. [Obs.] --Chaucer. In one, in union; in a single whole. One and one, One by one, singly; one at a time; one after another. ``Raising one by one the suppliant crew.' --Dryden.
One by one
One One, n. 1. A single unit; as, one is the base of all numbers. 2. A symbol representing a unit, as 1, or i. 3. A single person or thing. ``The shining ones.' --Bunyan. ``Hence, with your little ones.' --Shak. He will hate the one, and love the other. --Matt. vi. 24. That we may sit, one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left hand, in thy glory. --Mark x. 37. After one, after one fashion; alike. [Obs.] --Chaucer. At one, in agreement or concord. See At one, in the Vocab. Ever in one, continually; perpetually; always. [Obs.] --Chaucer. In one, in union; in a single whole. One and one, One by one, singly; one at a time; one after another. ``Raising one by one the suppliant crew.' --Dryden.
To give one the dor
Dor Dor, n. [Cf. Dor a beetle, and Hum, Humbug.] A trick, joke, or deception. --Beau. & Fl. To give one the dor, to make a fool of him. [Archaic] --P. Fletcher.
To give one the slip
To give one the slip, to slip away from one; to elude one. Slip dock. See under Dock. Slip link (Mach.), a connecting link so arranged as to allow some play of the parts, to avoid concussion. Slip rope (Naut.), a rope by which a cable is secured preparatory to slipping. --Totten. Slip stopper (Naut.), an arrangement for letting go the anchor suddenly.
To harp on one string
Harp Harp, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Harpedp. pr. & vb. n. Harping.] [AS. hearpian. See Harp, n.] 1. To play on the harp. I heard the voice of harpers, harping with their harps. --Rev. xiv. 2. 2. To dwell on or recur to a subject tediously or monotonously in speaking or in writing; to refer to something repeatedly or continually; -- usually with on or upon. ``Harpings upon old themes.' --W. Irving. Harping on what I am, Not what he knew I was. --Shak. To harp on one string, to dwell upon one subject with disagreeable or wearisome persistence. [Collog.]
To laugh one out of
Laugh Laugh, v. t. 1. To affect or influence by means of laughter or ridicule. Will you laugh me asleep, for I am very heavy? --Shak. I shall laugh myself to death. --Shak. 2. To express by, or utter with, laughter; -- with out. From his deep chest laughs out a loud applause. --Shak. To laugh away. (a) To drive away by laughter; as, to laugh away regret. (b) To waste in hilarity. ``Pompey doth this day laugh away his fortune.' --Shak. To laugh down. (a) To cause to cease or desist by laughter; as, to laugh down a speaker. (b) To cause to be given up on account of ridicule; as, to laugh down a reform. To laugh one out of, to cause one by laughter or ridicule to abandon or give up; as, to laugh one out of a plan or purpose. To laugh to scorn, to deride; to treat with mockery, contempt, and scorn; to despise.
To lay about one
Lay Lay, v. i. 1. To produce and deposit eggs. 2. (Naut.) To take a position; to come or go; as, to lay forward; to lay aloft. 3. To lay a wager; to bet. To lay about, or To lay about one, to strike vigorously in all directions. --J. H. Newman. To lay at, to strike or strike at. --Spenser. To lay for, to prepare to capture or assault; to lay wait for. [Colloq.] --Bp Hall. To lay in for, to make overtures for; to engage or secure the possession of. [Obs.] ``I have laid in for these.' --Dryden. To lay on, to strike; to beat; to attack. --Shak. To lay out, to purpose; to plan; as, he lays out to make a journey.
To lead one a dance
Dance Dance, n. [F. danse, of German origin. See Dance, v. i.] 1. The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figures and in accord with music. 2. (Mus.) A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, etc. Note: The word dance was used ironically, by the older writers, of many proceedings besides dancing. Of remedies of love she knew parchance For of that art she couth the olde dance. --Chaucer. Dance of Death (Art), an allegorical representation of the power of death over all, -- the old, the young, the high, and the low, being led by a dancing skeleton. Morris dance. See Morris. To lead one a dance, to cause one to go through a series of movements or experiences as if guided by a partner in a dance not understood.
To leave one out in the cold
To leave one out in the cold, to overlook or neglect him. [Colloq.]
To owe one a spite
Spite Spite, n. [Abbreviated fr. despite.] 1. Ill-will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite. --Pope. This is the deadly spite that angers. --Shak. 2. Vexation; chargrin; mortification. [R.] --Shak. In spite of, or Spite of, in opposition to all efforts of; in defiance or contempt of; notwithstanding. ``Continuing, spite of pain, to use a knee after it had been slightly ibnjured.' --H. Spenser. ``And saved me in spite of the world, the devil, and myself.' --South. ``In spite of all applications, the patient grew worse every day.' --Arbuthnot. See Syn. under Notwithstanding. To owe one a spite, to entertain a mean hatred for him. Syn: Pique, rancor; malevolence; grudge. Usage: Spite, Malice. Malice has more reference to the disposition, and spite to the manifestation of it in words and actions. It is, therefore, meaner than malice, thought not always more criminal. `` Malice . . . is more frequently employed to express the dispositions of inferior minds to execute every purpose of mischief within the more limited circle of their abilities.' --Cogan. ``Consider eke, that spite availeth naught.' --Wyatt. See Pique.
To pay one in his own coin
Coin Coin (koin), n. [F. coin, formerly also coing, wedge, stamp, corner, fr. L. cuneus wedge; prob. akin to E. cone, hone. See Hone, n., and cf. Coigne, Quoin, Cuneiform.] 1. A quoin; a corner or external angle; a wedge. See Coigne, and Quoin. 2. A piece of metal on which certain characters are stamped by government authority, making it legally current as money; -- much used in a collective sense. It is alleged that it [a subsidy] exceeded all the current coin of the realm. --Hallam. 3. That which serves for payment or recompense. The loss of present advantage to flesh and blood is repaid in a nobler coin. --Hammond. Coin balance. See Illust. of Balance. To pay one in his own coin, to return to one the same kind of injury or ill treatment as has been received from him. [Colloq.]
To serve one the same sauce
Sauce Sauce, n. [F., fr. OF. sausse, LL. salsa, properly, salt pickle, fr. L. salsus salted, salt, p. p. of salire to salt, fr. sal salt. See Salt, and cf. Saucer, Souse pickle, Souse to plunge.] 1. A composition of condiments and appetizing ingredients eaten with food as a relish; especially, a dressing for meat or fish or for puddings; as, mint sauce; sweet sauce, etc. ``Poignant sauce.' --Chaucer. High sauces and rich spices fetched from the Indies. --Sir S. Baker. 2. Any garden vegetables eaten with meat. [Prov. Eng. & Colloq. U.S.] --Forby. Bartlett. Roots, herbs, vine fruits, and salad flowers . . . they dish up various ways, and find them very delicious sauce to their meats, both roasted and boiled, fresh and salt. --Beverly. 3. Stewed or preserved fruit eaten with other food as a relish; as, apple sauce, cranberry sauce, etc. [U.S.] ``Stewed apple sauce.' --Mrs. Lincoln (Cook Book). 4. Sauciness; impertinence. [Low.] --Haliwell. To serve one the same sauce, to retaliate in the same kind. [Vulgar]
To strike one luck
(c) To separate by a blow or any sudden action; as, to strike off what is superfluous or corrupt. To strike oil, to find petroleum when boring for it; figuratively, to make a lucky hit financially. [Slang, U.S.] To strike one luck, to shake hands with one and wish good luck. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl. To strike out. (a) To produce by collision; to force out, as, to strike out sparks with steel. (b) To blot out; to efface; to erase. ``To methodize is as necessary as to strike out.' --Pope. (c) To form by a quick effort; to devise; to invent; to contrive, as, to strike out a new plan of finance. (d) (Baseball) To cause a player to strike out; -- said of the pitcher. See To strike out, under Strike, v. i. To strike sail. See under Sail. To strike up. (a) To cause to sound; to begin to beat. ``Strike up the drums.' --Shak. (b) To begin to sing or play; as, to strike up a tune. (c) To raise (as sheet metal), in making diahes, pans, etc., by blows or pressure in a die. To strike work, to quit work; to go on a strike.
upon some one
To pass by. (a) To disregard; to neglect. (b) To excuse; to spare; to overlook. To pass off, to impose fraudulently; to palm off. ``Passed himself off as a bishop.' --Macaulay. To pass (something) on or upon (some one), to put upon as a trick or cheat; to palm off. ``She passed the child on her husband for a boy.' --Dryden. To pass over, to overlook; not to note or resent; as, to pass over an affront.
Young one
Young one Young one A young human being; a child; also, a young animal, as a colt.

Meaning of one from wikipedia

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