Definition of in. Meaning of in. Synonyms of in

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A direct induced current
Direct current Direct current (Elec.) (a) A current flowing in one direction only; -- distinguished from alternating current. When steady and not pulsating a direct current is often called a continuous current. (b) A direct induced current, or momentary current of the same direction as the inducing current, produced by stopping or removing the latter; also, a similar current produced by removal of a magnet.
A inauris
Wattlebird Wat"tle*bird`, n. 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of honey eaters belonging to Anthoch[ae]ra and allied genera of the family Meliphagid[ae]. These birds usually have a large and conspicuous wattle of naked skin hanging down below each ear. They are natives of Australia and adjacent islands. Note: The best-known species (Anthoch[ae]ra carunculata) has the upper parts grayish brown, with a white stripe on each feather, and the wing and tail quills dark brown or blackish, tipped with withe. Its wattles, in life, are light blood-red. Called also wattled crow, wattled bee-eater, wattled honey eater. Another species (A. inauris) is streaked with black, gray, and white, and its long wattles are white, tipped with orange. The bush wattlebirds, belonging to the genus Anellobia, are closely related, but lack conspicuous wattles. The most common species (A. mellivora) is dark brown, finely streaked with white. Called also goruck creeper. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The Australian brush turkey.
A incisa
Guttatrap Gut"ta*trap, n. The inspissated juice of a tree of the genus Artocarpus (A. incisa, or breadfruit tree), sometimes used in making birdlime, on account of its glutinous quality.
A pig in a poke
Pig Pig, n. [Cf. D. big, bigge, LG. bigge, also Dan. pige girl, Sw. piga, Icel. p[=i]ka.] 1. The young of swine, male or female; also, any swine; a hog. ``Two pigges in a poke.' --Chaucer. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any wild species of the genus Sus and related genera. 3. [Cf. Sow a channel for melted iron.] An oblong mass of cast iron, lead, or other metal. See Mine pig, under Mine. 4. One who is hoggish; a greedy person. [Low] Masked pig. (Zo["o]l.) See under Masked. Pig bed (Founding), the bed of sand in which the iron from a smelting furnace is cast into pigs. Pig iron, cast iron in pigs, or oblong blocks or bars, as it comes from the smelting furnace. See Pig, 4. Pig yoke (Naut.), a nickname for a quadrant or sextant. A pig in a poke (that is, bag), a blind bargain; something bought or bargained for, without the quality or the value being known. [Colloq.]
acropetal botryose centripetal indefinite inflorescence
Indeterminate In`de*ter"mi*nate, a. [L. indeterminatus.] Not determinate; not certain or fixed; indefinite; not precise; as, an indeterminate number of years. --Paley. Indeterminate analysis (Math.), that branch of analysis which has for its object the solution of indeterminate problems. Indeterminate coefficients (Math.), coefficients arbitrarily assumed for convenience of calculation, or to facilitate some artifice of analysis. Their values are subsequently determined. Indeterminate equation (Math.), an equation in which the unknown quantities admit of an infinite number of values, or sets of values. A group of equations is indeterminate when it contains more unknown quantities than there are equations. Indeterminate inflorescence (Bot.), a mode of inflorescence in which the flowers all arise from axillary buds, the terminal bud going on to grow and sometimes continuing the stem indefinitely; -- called also acropetal, botryose, centripetal, & indefinite inflorescence. --Gray. Indeterminate problem (Math.), a problem which admits of an infinite number of solutions, or one in which there are fewer imposed conditions than there are unknown or required results. Indeterminate quantity (Math.), a quantity which has no fixed value, but which may be varied in accordance with any proposed condition. Indeterminate series (Math.), a series whose terms proceed by the powers of an indeterminate quantity, sometimes also with indeterminate exponents, or indeterminate coefficients. -- In`de*ter"mi*nate*ly adv. -- In`de*ter"mi*nate*ness, n.
Ad infinitum
Ad infinitum Ad in`fi*ni"tum [L., to infinity.] Without limit; endlessly.
Ad interim
Ad interim Ad in"ter*im[L.] Meanwhile; temporary.
Advowson in gross
Gross Gross, n. [F. gros (in sense 1), grosse (in sense 2). See Gross, a.] 1. The main body; the chief part, bulk, or mass. ``The gross of the enemy.' --Addison. For the gross of the people, they are considered as a mere herd of cattle. --Burke. 2. sing. & pl. The number of twelve dozen; twelve times twelve; as, a gross of bottles; ten gross of pens. Advowson in gross (Law), an advowson belonging to a person, and not to a manor. A great gross, twelve gross; one hundred and forty-four dozen. By the gross, by the quantity; at wholesale. Common in gross. (Law) See under Common, n. In the gross, In gross, in the bulk, or the undivided whole; all parts taken together.
Age of invertebrates
Invertebrate In*ver"te*brate, a. (Zo["o]l.) Destitute of a backbone; having no vertebr[ae]; of or pertaining to the Invertebrata. -- n. One of the Invertebrata. Age of invertebrates. See Age, and Silurian.
All in all
All All, n. The whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing; everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole; totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at stake. Death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all. --Shak. All that thou seest is mine. --Gen. xxxi. 43. Note: All is used with of, like a partitive; as, all of a thing, all of us. After all, after considering everything to the contrary; nevertheless. All in all, a phrase which signifies all things to a person, or everything desired; (also adverbially) wholly; altogether. Thou shalt be all in all, and I in thee, Forever. --Milton. Trust me not at all, or all in all. --Tennyson. All in the wind (Naut.), a phrase denoting that the sails are parallel with the course of the wind, so as to shake. All told, all counted; in all. And all, and the rest; and everything connected. ``Bring our crown and all.' --Shak. At all. (a) In every respect; wholly; thoroughly. [Obs.] ``She is a shrew at al(l).' --Chaucer. (b) A phrase much used by way of enforcement or emphasis, usually in negative or interrogative sentences, and signifying in any way or respect; in the least degree or to the least extent; in the least; under any circumstances; as, he has no ambition at all; has he any property at all? ``Nothing at all.' --Shak. ``If thy father at all miss me.' --1 Sam. xx. 6. Over all, everywhere. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Note: All is much used in composition to enlarge the meaning, or add force to a word. In some instances, it is completely incorporated into words, and its final consonant is dropped, as in almighty, already, always: but, in most instances, it is an adverb prefixed to adjectives or participles, but usually with a hyphen, as, all-bountiful, all-glorious, allimportant, all-surrounding, etc. In others it is an adjective; as, allpower, all-giver. Anciently many words, as, alabout, alaground, etc., were compounded with all, which are now written separately.
All in the wind
All All, n. The whole number, quantity, or amount; the entire thing; everything included or concerned; the aggregate; the whole; totality; everything or every person; as, our all is at stake. Death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all. --Shak. All that thou seest is mine. --Gen. xxxi. 43. Note: All is used with of, like a partitive; as, all of a thing, all of us. After all, after considering everything to the contrary; nevertheless. All in all, a phrase which signifies all things to a person, or everything desired; (also adverbially) wholly; altogether. Thou shalt be all in all, and I in thee, Forever. --Milton. Trust me not at all, or all in all. --Tennyson. All in the wind (Naut.), a phrase denoting that the sails are parallel with the course of the wind, so as to shake. All told, all counted; in all. And all, and the rest; and everything connected. ``Bring our crown and all.' --Shak. At all. (a) In every respect; wholly; thoroughly. [Obs.] ``She is a shrew at al(l).' --Chaucer. (b) A phrase much used by way of enforcement or emphasis, usually in negative or interrogative sentences, and signifying in any way or respect; in the least degree or to the least extent; in the least; under any circumstances; as, he has no ambition at all; has he any property at all? ``Nothing at all.' --Shak. ``If thy father at all miss me.' --1 Sam. xx. 6. Over all, everywhere. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Note: All is much used in composition to enlarge the meaning, or add force to a word. In some instances, it is completely incorporated into words, and its final consonant is dropped, as in almighty, already, always: but, in most instances, it is an adverb prefixed to adjectives or participles, but usually with a hyphen, as, all-bountiful, all-glorious, allimportant, all-surrounding, etc. In others it is an adjective; as, allpower, all-giver. Anciently many words, as, alabout, alaground, etc., were compounded with all, which are now written separately.
alveolar index
Gnathic Gnath"ic, a. [Gr. ? the jaw.] (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the jaw. Gnathic index, in a skull, the ratio of the distance from the middle of the nasofrontal suture to the basion (taken equal to 100), to the distance from the basion to the middle of the front edge of the upper jaw; -- called also alveolar index. Skulls with the gnathic index below 98 are orthognathous, from 98 to 103 mesognathous, and above 103 are prognathous. --Flower.
Andira inermis
Partridge Par"tridge, n. [OE. partriche, pertriche, OF. pertris, perdriz, F. perdrix, L. perdix, -icis, fr. Gr. ?.] (Zo["o]l.) 1. Any one of numerous species of small gallinaceous birds of the genus Perdix and several related genera of the family Perdicid[ae], of the Old World. The partridge is noted as a game bird. Full many a fat partrich had he in mew. --Chaucer. Note: The common European, or gray, partridge (Perdix cinerea) and the red-legged partridge (Caccabis rubra) of Southern Europe and Asia are well-known species. 2. Any one of several species of quail-like birds belonging to Colinus, and allied genera. [U.S.] Note: Among them are the bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus) of the Eastern States; the plumed, or mountain, partridge (Oreortyx pictus) of California; the Massena partridge (Cyrtonyx Montezum[ae]); and the California partridge (Callipepla Californica). 3. The ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). [New Eng.] Bamboo partridge (Zo["o]l.), a spurred partridge of the genus Bambusicola. Several species are found in China and the East Indies. Night partridge (Zo["o]l.), the woodcock. [Local, U.S.] Painted partridge (Zo["o]l.), a francolin of South Africa (Francolinus pictus). Partridge berry. (Bot.) (a) The scarlet berry of a trailing american plant (Mitchella repens) of the order Rubiace[ae], having roundish evergreen leaves, and white fragrant flowers sometimes tinged with purple, growing in pairs with the ovaries united, and producing the berries which remain over winter; also, the plant itself. (b) The fruit of the creeping wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens); also, the plant itself. Partridge dove (Zo["o]l.) Same as Mountain witch, under Mountain. Partridge pea (Bot.), a yellow-flowered leguminous herb (Cassia Cham[ae]crista), common in sandy fields in the Eastern United States. Partridge shell (Zo["o]l.), a large marine univalve shell (Dolium perdix), having colors variegated like those of the partridge. Partridge wood (a) A variegated wood, much esteemed for cabinetwork. It is obtained from tropical America, and one source of it is said to be the leguminous tree Andira inermis. Called also pheasant wood. (b) A name sometimes given to the dark-colored and striated wood of some kind of palm, which is used for walking sticks and umbrella handles. Sea partridge (Zo["o]l.), an Asiatic sand partridge (Ammoperdix Bonhami); -- so called from its note. Snow partridge (Zo["o]l.), a large spurred partridge (Lerwa nivicola) which inhabits the high mountains of Asia. Spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood partridge, or Hill partridge (Zo["o]l.), any small Asiatic partridge of the genus Arboricola.
Angle of incidence
Angle of incidence Angle of incidence (A["e]ronautics) The angle between the chord of an a["e]rocurve and the relative direction of the undisturbed air current.
Angle of incidence
Incidence In"ci*dence, n. [Cf. F. incidence.] 1. A falling on or upon; an incident; an event. [Obs.] --Bp. Hall. 2. (Physics) The direction in which a body, or a ray of light or heat, falls on any surface. In equal incidences there is a considerable inequality of refractions. --Sir I. Newton. Angle of incidence, the angle which a ray of light, or the line of incidence of a body, falling on any surface, makes with a perpendicular to that surface; also formerly, the complement of this angle. Line of incidence, the line in the direction of which a surface is struck by a body, ray of light, and the like.
Aphrophora interrupta
Hop Hop, n. [OE. hoppe; akin to D. hop, hoppe, OHG. hopfo, G. hopfen; cf. LL. hupa, W. hopez, Armor. houpez, and Icel. humall, SW. & Dan. humle.] 1. (Bot.) A climbing plant (Humulus Lupulus), having a long, twining, annual stalk. It is cultivated for its fruit (hops). 2. The catkin or strobilaceous fruit of the hop, much used in brewing to give a bitter taste. 3. The fruit of the dog-rose. See Hip. Hop back. (Brewing) See under 1st Back. Hop clover (Bot.), a species of yellow clover having heads like hops in miniature (Trifolium agrarium, and T. procumbens). Hop flea (Zo["o]l.), a small flea beetle (Haltica concinna), very injurious to hops. Hop fly (Zo["o]l.), an aphid (Phorodon humuli), very injurious to hop vines. Hop froth fly (Zo["o]l.), an hemipterous insect (Aphrophora interrupta), allied to the cockoo spits. It often does great damage to hop vines. Hop hornbeam (Bot.), an American tree of the genus Ostrya (O. Virginica) the American ironwood; also, a European species (O. vulgaris). Hop moth (Zo["o]l.), a moth (Hypena humuli), which in the larval state is very injurious to hop vines. Hop picker, one who picks hops. Hop pole, a pole used to support hop vines. Hop tree (Bot.), a small American tree (Ptelia trifoliata), having broad, flattened fruit in large clusters, sometimes used as a substitute for hops. Hop vine (Bot.), the climbing vine or stalk of the hop.
Artocarpus incisa
Breadfruit Bread"fruit`, n. (Bot.) 1. The fruit of a tree (Artocarpus incisa) found in the islands of the Pacific, esp. the South Sea islands. It is of a roundish form, from four to six or seven inches in diameter, and, when baked, somewhat resembles bread, and is eaten as food, whence the name. 2. (Bot.) The tree itself, which is one of considerable size, with large, lobed leaves. Cloth is made from the bark, and the timber is used for many purposes. Called also breadfruit tree and bread tree.
Artocarpus integrifolia
Jack Jack (j[a^]k), n. [Pg. jaca, Malayalam, tsjaka.] (Bot.) A large tree, the Artocarpus integrifolia, common in the East Indies, closely allied to the breadfruit, from which it differs in having its leaves entire. The fruit is of great size, weighing from thirty to forty pounds, and through its soft fibrous matter are scattered the seeds, which are roasted and eaten. The wood is of a yellow color, fine grain, and rather heavy, and is much used in cabinetwork. It is also used for dyeing a brilliant yellow. [Written also jak.]
Artocarpus integrifolia
Jackwood Jack"wood`, n. Wood of the jack (Artocarpus integrifolia), used in cabinetwork.
Asiatic or Indian civet
Zibet ib"et, Zibeth ib"eth, n. [Cf. It. zibetto. See Civet.] (Zo["o]l.) A carnivorous mammal (Viverra zibetha) closely allied to the civet, from which it differs in having the spots on the body less distinct, the throat whiter, and the black rings on the tail more numerous. Note: It inhabits India, Southern China, and the East Indies. It yields a perfume similar to that of the civet. It is often domesticated by the natives, and then serves the same purposes as the domestic cat. Called also Asiatic, or Indian, civet.
Axes of coordinates in a plane
Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa.
Axes of coordinates in space
Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa.
Axis in peritrochio
Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa.
Bill of indictment
Indictment In*dict"ment, n. [Cf. Inditement.] 1. The act of indicting, or the state of being indicted. 2. (Law) The formal statement of an offense, as framed by the prosecuting authority of the State, and found by the grand jury. Note: To the validity of an indictment a finding by the grand jury is essential, while an information rests only on presentation by the prosecuting authority. 3. An accusation in general; a formal accusation. Bill of indictment. See under Bill.
Biting in
Biting in Bit"ing in" (Etching.) The process of corroding or eating into metallic plates, by means of an acid. See Etch. --G. Francis.
Blank indorsement
Indorsement In*dorse"ment, n. [From Indorse; cf. Endorsement.] [Written also endorsement.] 1. The act of writing on the back of a note, bill, or other written instrument. 2. That which is written on the back of a note, bill, or other paper, as a name, an order for, or a receipt of, payment, or the return of an officer, etc.; a writing, usually upon the back, but sometimes on the face, of a negotiable instrument, by which the property therein is assigned and transferred. --Story. Byles. Burrill. 3. Sanction, support, or approval; as, the indorsement of a rumor, an opinion, a course, conduct. Blank indorsement. See under Blank.
Blank indorsement
Blank Blank, a. [OE. blank, blonc, blaunc, blaunche, fr. F. blanc, fem. blanche, fr. OHG. blanch shining, bright, white, G. blank; akin to E. blink, cf. also AS. blanc white. ?98. See Blink, and cf. 1st Blanch.] 1. Of a white or pale color; without color. To the blank moon Her office they prescribed. --Milton. 2. Free from writing, printing, or marks; having an empty space to be filled in with some special writing; -- said of checks, official documents, etc.; as, blank paper; a blank check; a blank ballot. 3. Utterly confounded or discomfited. Adam . . . astonied stood, and blank. --Milton. 4. Empty; void; without result; fruitless; as, a blank space; a blank day. 5. Lacking characteristics which give variety; as, a blank desert; a blank wall; destitute of interests, affections, hopes, etc.; as, to live a blank existence; destitute of sensations; as, blank unconsciousness. 6. Lacking animation and intelligence, or their associated characteristics, as expression of face, look, etc.; expressionless; vacant. ``Blank and horror-stricken faces.' --C. Kingsley. The blank . . . glance of a half returned consciousness. --G. Eliot. 7. Absolute; downright; unmixed; as, blank terror. Blank bar (Law), a plea put in to oblige the plaintiff in an action of trespass to assign the certain place where the trespass was committed; -- called also common bar. Blank cartridge, a cartridge containing no ball. Blank deed. See Deed. Blank door, or Blank window (Arch.), a depression in a wall of the size of a door or window, either for symmetrical effect, or for the more convenient insertion of a door or window at a future time, should it be needed. Blank indorsement (Law), an indorsement which omits the name of the person in whose favor it is made; it is usually made by simply writing the name of the indorser on the back of the bill. Blank line (Print.), a vacant space of the breadth of a line, on a printed page; a line of quadrats. Blank tire (Mech.), a tire without a flange. Blank tooling. See Blind tooling, under Blind. Blank verse. See under Verse. Blank wall, a wall in which there is no opening; a dead wall.
boat insect
Boat bug Boat" bug` (Zo["o]l.) An aquatic hemipterous insect of the genus Notonecta; -- so called from swimming on its back, which gives it the appearance of a little boat. Called also boat fly, boat insect, boatman, and water boatman.
Bringer in
Bringer Bring"er, n. One who brings. Yet the first bringer of unwelcome news Hath but a losing office. --Shak. Bringer in, one who, or that which, introduces.
brown Indian hemp
Ambary Am*ba"ry, n., or Ambary hemp Ambary hemp . [Hind. amb[=a]r[=a], amb[=a]r[=i].] A valuable East Indian fiber plant (Hibiscus cannabinus), or its fiber, which is used throughout India for making ropes, cordage, and a coarse canvas and sackcloth; -- called also brown Indian hemp.

Meaning of in from wikipedia

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