Definition of Wreck. Meaning of Wreck. Synonyms of Wreck

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Wreck. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Wreck and, of course, Wreck synonyms and on the right images related to the word Wreck.

Definition of Wreck

Wreck
Wreck Wreck, v. t. & n. See 2d & 3d Wreak.
Wreck
Wreck Wreck, v. i. 1. To suffer wreck or ruin. --Milton. 2. To work upon a wreck, as in saving property or lives, or in plundering.

Meaning of Wreck from wikipedia

- Wreck or The Wreck may refer to: Wreck, a collision of an automobile, aircraft or other vehicle Shipwreck, the remains of a ship after a crisis at sea...
- Wreck-It Ralph is a 2012 American computer-animated comedy film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 52nd...
- The wreck of the RMS Titanic lies at a depth of about 12,500 feet (3,800 metres; 2,100 fathoms), about 370 nautical miles (690 kilometres) south-southeast...
- animated film produced by the studio, it is the sequel to the 2012 film Wreck-It Ralph. Directed by Rich Moore and Phil Johnston (in his feature directorial...
- "The Wreck of the Hesperus" is a narrative poem by American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, first published in Ballads and Other Poems in 1842. It is...
- The Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech is the 1930 Ford Model A Sport coupe that serves as the official mascot of the student body at the Georgia Institute...
- Wrecked may refer to: Wrecked (film), a 2011 thriller directed by Michael Greenspan Scenic Route (film) or Wrecked, a 2013 psychological thriller directed...
- The Receiver of Wreck is an official who administers law dealing with maritime wrecks and salvage in some countries having a British administrative heritage...
- A train wreck, train collision, train accident or train crash is a type of disaster involving one or more trains. Train wrecks often occur as a result...
- organizations). Historic wrecks are attractive to maritime archaeologists because they preserve historical information: for example, studying the wreck of Mary Rose...