Definition of Vulgaris. Meaning of Vulgaris. Synonyms of Vulgaris

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Definition of Vulgaris

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A vulgaris
Columbine Col"um*bine, n. [LL. columbina, L. columbinus dovelike, fr. columba dove: cf. F. colombine. Perh. so called from the beaklike spurs of its flowers.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of several species of the genus Aquilegia; as, A. vulgaris, or the common garden columbine; A. Canadensis, the wild red columbine of North America. 2. The mistress or sweetheart of Harlequin in pantomimes. --Brewer.
Acerina vulgaris
Ruff Ruff, Ruffe Ruffe, n. [OE. ruffe.] (Zo["o]l.) A small freshwater European perch (Acerina vulgaris); -- called also pope, blacktail, and stone, or striped, perch.
Agrostis vulgaris
Agrostis A*gros"tis, n. [L., fr. Gr. ?.] A genus of grasses, including species called in common language bent grass. Some of them, as redtop (Agrostis vulgaris), are valuable pasture grasses.
Agrostis vulgaris
Bent Bent, n. [AS. beonet; akin to OHG. pinuz, G. binse, rush, bent grass; of unknown origin.] 1. A reedlike grass; a stalk of stiff, coarse grass. His spear a bent, both stiff and strong. --Drayton. 2. (Bot.) A grass of the genus Agrostis, esp. Agrostis vulgaris, or redtop. The name is also used of many other grasses, esp. in America. 3. Any neglected field or broken ground; a common; a moor. [Obs.] --Wright. Bowmen bickered upon the bent. --Chevy Chase.
Armeria vulgaris
Thrift Thrift, n. [Icel. [thorn]rift. See Thrive.] 1. A thriving state; good husbandry; economical management in regard to property; frugality. The rest, . . . willing to fall to thrift, prove very good husbands. --Spenser. 2. Success and advance in the acquisition of property; increase of worldly goods; gain; prosperity. ``Your thrift is gone full clean.' --Chaucer. I have a mind presages me such thrift. --Shak. 3. Vigorous growth, as of a plant. 4. (Bot.) One of several species of flowering plants of the genera Statice and Armeria. Common thrift (Bot.), Armeria vulgaris; -- also called sea pink. Syn: Frugality; economy; prosperity; gain; profit.
Artemisia vulgaris
Mugwort Mug"wort`, n. [AS. mucgwyrt. Cf. Midge.] (Bot.) A somewhat aromatic composite weed (Artemisia vulgaris), at one time used medicinally; -- called also motherwort.
B vulgaris
Barberry Bar"ber*ry, n. [OE. barbarin, barbere, OF. berbere.] (Bot.) A shrub of the genus Berberis, common along roadsides and in neglected fields. B. vulgaris is the species best known; its oblong red berries are made into a preserve or sauce, and have been deemed efficacious in fluxes and fevers. The bark dyes a fine yellow, esp. the bark of the root. [Also spelt berberry.]
Belone vulgaris
Garfish Gar"fish`, n. [See Gar, n.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European marine fish (Belone vulgaris); -- called also gar, gerrick, greenback, greenbone, gorebill, hornfish, longnose, mackerel guide, sea needle, and sea pike. (b) One of several species of similar fishes of the genus Tylosurus, of which one species (T. marinus) is common on the Atlantic coast. T. Caribb[ae]us, a very large species, and T. crassus, are more southern; -- called also needlefish. Many of the common names of the European garfish are also applied to the American species.
Beta vulgaris
Beet Beet (b[=e]t), n. [AS. bete, from L. beta.] 1. (Bot.) A biennial plant of the genus Beta, which produces an edible root the first year and seed the second year. 2. The root of plants of the genus Beta, different species and varieties of which are used for the table, for feeding stock, or in making sugar. Note: There are many varieties of the common beet (Beta vulgaris). The Old ``white beet', cultivated for its edible leafstalks, is a distinct species (Beta Cicla).
Beta vulgaris
Beetrave Beet"rave`, n. [F. betterave; bette beet + rave radish.] The common beet (Beta vulgaris).
Box vulgaris
Boce Boce (b[=o]s), n. [L. box, bocis, Gr. bo`ax, bw^x.] (Zo["o]l.) A European fish (Box vulgaris), having a compressed body and bright colors; -- called also box, and bogue.
Brunela vulgaris
Healall Heal"all`, n. (Bot.) A common herb of the Mint family (Brunela vulgaris), destitute of active properties, but anciently thought a panacea.
Brunella vulgaris
Self-heal Self`-heal", n. (Bot.) A blue-flowered labiate plant (Brunella vulgaris); the healall.
Brunella vulgaris
Sicklewort Sic"kle*wort`, n. [AS. sicolwyrt.] (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Coronilla (C. scorpioides); -- so named from its curved pods. (b) The healall (Brunella vulgaris).
Bufo vulgaris
Toad Toad, n. [OE. tode, tade, AS. t[=a]die, t[=a]dige; of unknown origin. Cf. Tadpole.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of batrachians belonging to the genus Bufo and allied genera, especially those of the family Bufonid[ae]. Toads are generally terrestrial in their habits except during the breeding season, when they seek the water. Most of the species burrow beneath the earth in the daytime and come forth to feed on insects at night. Most toads have a rough, warty skin in which are glands that secrete an acrid fluid. Note: The common toad (Bufo vulgaris) and the natterjack are familiar European species. The common American toad (B. lentiginosus) is similar to the European toad, but is less warty and is more active, moving chiefly by leaping. Obstetrical toad. (Zo["o]l.) See under Obstetrical. Surinam toad. (Zo["o]l.) See Pita. Toad lizard (Zo["o]l.), a horned toad. Toad pipe (Bot.), a hollow-stemmed plant (Equisetum limosum) growing in muddy places. --Dr. Prior. Toad rush (Bot.), a low-growing kind of rush (Juncus bufonius). Toad snatcher (Zo["o]l.), the reed bunting. [Prov. Eng.] Toad spittle. (Zo["o]l.) See Cuckoo spit, under Cuckoo. Tree toad. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tree.
Buteo vulgaris
Buzzard Buz"zard (b[u^]z"z[~e]rd), n.[O.E. busard, bosard, F. busard, fr. buse, L. buteo, a kind of falcon or hawk.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A bird of prey of the Hawk family, belonging to the genus Buteo and related genera. Note: The Buteo vulgaris is the common buzzard of Europe. The American species (of which the most common are B. borealis, B. Pennsylvanicus, and B. lineatus) are usually called hen hawks. -- The rough-legged buzzard, or bee hawk, of Europe (Pernis apivorus) feeds on bees and their larv[ae], with other insects, and reptiles. -- The moor buzzard of Europe is Circus [ae]ruginosus. See Turkey buzzard, and Carrion buzzard. Bald buzzard, the fishhawk or osprey. See Fishhawk. 2. A blockhead; a dunce. It is common, to a proverb, to call one who can not be taught, or who continues obstinately ignorant, a buzzard. --Goldsmith.
C vulgaris
Carline thistle Car"line this`tle [F. carline, It., Sp., & Pg., carlina. Said to be so called from the Emperor Charlemagne, whose army is reputed to have used it as a remedy for pestilence.] (Bot.) A prickly plant of the genus Carlina (C. vulgaris), found in Europe and Asia.
Calluna vulgaris
Ling Ling, n. [Icel. lyng; akin to Dan. lyng, Sw. ljung.] (Bot.) Heather (Calluna vulgaris). Ling honey, a sort of wild honey, made from the flowers of the heather. --Holland.
Carasius vulgaris
Crucian carp Cru"cian carp` (-shan k?rp`). [Cf. Sw. karussa, G. karausche, F. carousse, -assin, corassin, LL. coracinus, Gr. ????? a sort of fish.] (Zo["o]l.) A kind of European carp (Carasius vulgaris), inferior to the common carp; -- called also German carp. Note: The gibel or Prussian carp is now generally considered a variety of the crucian carp, or perhaps a hybrid between it and the common carp.
Citrullus vulgaris
Watermelon Wa"ter*mel`on, n. (Bot.) The very large ovoid or roundish fruit of a cucurbitaceous plant (Citrullus vulgaris) of many varieties; also, the plant itself. The fruit sometimes weighs many pounds; its pulp is usually pink in color, and full of a sweet watery juice. It is a native of tropical Africa, but is now cultivated in many countries. See Illust. of Melon.
Clupea vulgaris
Allice Al"lice, Allis Al"lis, n. (Zo["o]l.) The European shad (Clupea vulgaris); allice shad. See Alose.
Coccothraustes vulgaris
Grosbeak Gros"beak, n. [Gross + beak: cf. F. gros-bec.] (Zo["o]l.) One of various species of finches having a large, stout beak. The common European grosbeak or hawfinch is Coccothraustes vulgaris. Note: Among the best known American species are the rose-breasted (Habia Ludoviciana); the blue (Guiraca c[oe]rulea); the pine (Pinicola enucleator); and the evening grosbeak. See Hawfinch, and Cardinal grosbeak, Evening grosbeak, under Cardinal and Evening. [Written also grossbeak.]
Coccothraustes vulgaris
Hawfinch Haw"finch`, n. (Zo["o]l.) The common European grosbeak (Coccothraustes vulgaris); -- called also cherry finch, and coble.
Conger vulgaris
Conger Con"ger, n. [L. conger, congrus, akin to Gr. ?: cf. F. congre.] (Zo["o]l.) The conger eel; -- called also congeree. Conger sea (Zo["o]l.), the sea eel; a large species of eel (Conger vulgaris), which sometimes grows to the length of ten feet.
Cydonia vulgaris
Quince Quince, n. [Prob. a pl. from OE. quyne, coin, OF. coin, cooin, F. coing, from L. Cydonius a quince tree, as adj., Cydonian, Gr. ? Cydonian, ? ? a quince, fr. ? Cydonia, a city in Crete, ? the Cydonians. Cf. Quiddany.] 1. The fruit of a shrub (Cydonia vulgaris) belonging to the same tribe as the apple. It somewhat resembles an apple, but differs in having many seeds in each carpel. It has hard flesh of high flavor, but very acid, and is largely used for marmalade, jelly, and preserves. 2. (Bot.) a quince tree or shrub. Japan quince (Bot.), an Eastern Asiatic shrub (Cydonia, formerly Pyrus, Japonica) and its very fragrant but inedible fruit. The shrub has very showy flowers, usually red, but sometimes pink or white, and is much grown for ornament. Quince curculio (Zo["o]l.), a small gray and yellow curculio (Conotrachelus crat[ae]gi) whose larva lives in quinces. Quince tree (Bot.), the small tree (Cydonia vulgaris) which produces the quince.
Cydonia vulgaris
Quince Quince, n. [Prob. a pl. from OE. quyne, coin, OF. coin, cooin, F. coing, from L. Cydonius a quince tree, as adj., Cydonian, Gr. ? Cydonian, ? ? a quince, fr. ? Cydonia, a city in Crete, ? the Cydonians. Cf. Quiddany.] 1. The fruit of a shrub (Cydonia vulgaris) belonging to the same tribe as the apple. It somewhat resembles an apple, but differs in having many seeds in each carpel. It has hard flesh of high flavor, but very acid, and is largely used for marmalade, jelly, and preserves. 2. (Bot.) a quince tree or shrub. Japan quince (Bot.), an Eastern Asiatic shrub (Cydonia, formerly Pyrus, Japonica) and its very fragrant but inedible fruit. The shrub has very showy flowers, usually red, but sometimes pink or white, and is much grown for ornament. Quince curculio (Zo["o]l.), a small gray and yellow curculio (Conotrachelus crat[ae]gi) whose larva lives in quinces. Quince tree (Bot.), the small tree (Cydonia vulgaris) which produces the quince.
Cydonia vulgaris
Cydonin Cy*do"nin (s?-d?"n?n), n. (Chem.) A peculiar mucilaginous substance extracted from the seeds of the quince (Cydonia vulgaris), and regarded as a variety of amylose.
Dentex vulgaris
Dentex Den"tex, n. [NL., cf. L. dentix a sort of sea fish.] (Zo["o]l.) An edible European marine fish (Sparus dentex, or Dentex vulgaris) of the family Percid[ae].
Erica or Calluna vulgaris
Heath Heath, n. [OE. heth waste land, the plant heath, AS. h??; akin to D. & G. heide, Icel. hei?r waste land, Dan. hede, Sw. hed, Goth. haipi field, L. bucetum a cow pasture; cf. W. coed a wood, Skr. ksh?tra field. [root]20.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A low shrub (Erica, or Calluna, vulgaris), with minute evergreen leaves, and handsome clusters of pink flowers. It is used in Great Britain for brooms, thatch, beds for the poor, and for heating ovens. It is also called heather, and ling. (b) Also, any species of the genus Erica, of which several are European, and many more are South African, some of great beauty. See Illust. of Heather. 2. A place overgrown with heath; any cheerless tract of country overgrown with shrubs or coarse herbage. Their stately growth, though bare, Stands on the blasted heath. --Milton Heath cock (Zo["o]l.), the blackcock. See Heath grouse (below). Heath grass (Bot.), a kind of perennial grass, of the genus Triodia (T. decumbens), growing on dry heaths. Heath grouse, or Heath game (Zo["o]l.), a European grouse (Tetrao tetrix), which inhabits heats; -- called also black game, black grouse, heath poult, heath fowl, moor fowl. The male is called, heath cock, and blackcock; the female, heath hen, and gray hen. Heath hen. (Zo["o]l.) See Heath grouse (above). Heath pea (bot.), a species of bitter vetch (Lathyris macrorhizus), the tubers of which are eaten, and in Scotland are used to flavor whisky. Heath throstle (Zo["o]l.), a European thrush which frequents heaths; the ring ouzel.
F vulgaris
Francolin Fran"co*lin, n. [F.; cf. It. francolino, Sp. francolin.] (Zo["o]l.) A spurred partidge of the genus Francolinus and allied genera, of Asia and Africa. The common species (F. vulgaris) was formerly common in southern Europe, but is now nearly restricted to Asia.

Meaning of Vulgaris from wikipedia

- Vulgaris, a Latin adjective meaning common, or something that is derived from the m****es of common people, may refer to: Vulgaris aerae, the Latin translation...
- Syringa vulgaris Flora Europaea: Syringa vulgaris Biota of North Idaho America Program, Syringa vulgaris Altervista Flora Italiana, Syringa vulgaris Illinois...
- rosa, "rose". The Latin specific epithet vulgaris means "common", in the sense of "widespread". Primula vulgaris is a perennial growing 10–30 cm (4–12 in)...
- term anno aerae nostrae vulgaris discovered so far was in a 1615 book by Johannes Kepler. Kepler uses it again, as ab Anno vulgaris aerae, in a 1616 table...
- subspecies Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris. The wild ancestor of the cultivated beets is the sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima). Beta vulgaris is an herbaceous...
- Chard or Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris, Cicla-Group and Flavescens-Group) (/tʃɑːrd/) is a green leafy vegetable. In the cultivars of the Flavescens-Group...
- Phaseolus vulgaris, also known as the common bean, is a herbaceous annual plant grown worldwide for its edible dry seeds or unripe fruit (both commonly...
- Proteus vulgaris, so this organism has a long history in microbiology. Over the past two decades, the genus Proteus, and in particular P. vulgaris, has undergone...
- vulgaris 'Annemarie' (d) AGM / RHS Gardening RHS Plant Selector Calluna vulgaris 'Anthony Davis' / RHS Gardening RHS Plant Selector Calluna vulgaris 'Beoley...
- Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare chronic blistering skin disease and the most common form of pemphigus. Pemphigus was derived from the Gr**** word pemphix,...
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