Definition of Un . Meaning of Un . Synonyms of Un

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Un . Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Un and, of course, Un synonyms and on the right images related to the word Un .

Definition of Un

No result for Un . Showing similar results...

bohun upas
Upas U"pas, n. [Malay p?hn-?pas; p?hn a tree + ?pas poison.] 1. (Bot.) A tree (Antiaris toxicaria) of the Breadfruit family, common in the forests of Java and the neighboring islands. Its secretions are poisonous, and it has been fabulously reported that the atmosphere about it is deleterious. Called also bohun upas.
Bohun upas
Bohun upas Bo"hun u"pas See Upas.
dun crow
Hooded Hood"ed, a. 1. Covered with a hood. 2. Furnished with a hood or something like a hood. 3. Hood-shaped; esp. (Bot.), rolled up like a cornet of paper; cuculate, as the spethe of the Indian turnip. 4. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Having the head conspicuously different in color from the rest of the plumage; -- said of birds. (b) Having a hoodlike crest or prominence on the head or neck; as, the hooded seal; a hooded snake. Hooded crow, a European crow (Corvus cornix); -- called also hoody, dun crow, and royston crow. Hooded gull, the European black-headed pewit or gull. Hooded merganser. See Merganser. Hooded seal, a large North Atlantic seal (Cystophora cristata). The male has a large, inflatible, hoodlike sac upon the head. Called also hoodcap. Hooded sheldrake, the hooded merganser. See Merganser. Hooded snake. See Cobra de capello, Asp, Haje, etc. Hooded warbler, a small American warbler (Sylvania mitrata).
Gun tackle
Tackle Tac"kle (?; sometimes improperly pronounced ?, especially by seamen), n. [OE. takel, akin to LG. & D. takel, Dan. takkel, Sw. tackel; perhaps akin to E. taw, v.t., or to take.] 1. Apparatus for raising or lowering heavy weights, consisting of a rope and pulley blocks; sometimes, the rope and attachments, as distinct from the block. 2. Any instruments of action; an apparatus by which an object is moved or operated; gear; as, fishing tackle, hunting tackle; formerly, specifically, weapons. ``She to her tackle fell.' --Hudibras. Note: In Chaucer, it denotes usually an arrow or arrows. 3. (Naut.) The rigging and apparatus of a ship; also, any purchase where more than one block is used. Fall and tackle. See the Note under Pulley. Fishing tackle. See under Fishing, a. Ground tackle (Naut.), anchors, cables, etc. Gun tackle, the apparatus or appliances for hauling cannon in or out. Tackle fall, the rope, or rather the end of the rope, of a tackle, to which the power is applied. Tack tackle (Naut.), a small tackle to pull down the tacks of the principal sails. Tackle board, Tackle post (Ropemaking), a board, frame, or post, at the end of a ropewalk, for supporting the spindels, or whirls, for twisting the yarns.
Hydropneumatic gun carriage
Hydropneumatic gun carriage Hy`dro*pneu*mat"ic gun carriage (Ordnance) A disappearing gun carriage in which the recoil is checked by cylinders containing liquid and air, the air when compressed furnishing the power for restoring the gun to the firing position. It is used with some English and European heavy guns.
Noun substantive
Substantive Sub"stan*tive, a. [L. substantivus: cf. F. substantif.] 1. Betokening or expressing existence; as, the substantive verb, that is, the verb to be. 2. Depending on itself; independent. He considered how sufficient and substantive this land was to maintain itself without any aid of the foreigner. --Bacon. 3. Enduring; solid; firm; substantial. Strength and magnitude are qualities which impress the imagination in a powerful and substantive manner. --Hazlitt. 4. Pertaining to, or constituting, the essential part or principles; as, the law substantive. Noun substantive (Gram.), a noun which designates an object, material or immaterial; a substantive. Substantive color, one which communicates its color without the aid of a mordant or base; -- opposed to adjective color.
Nun buoy
Nun Nun, n. [OE. nunne, AS. nunne, fr. L. nonna nun, nonnus monk; cf. Gr. ?, ?; of unknown origin. Cf. Nunnery.] 1. A woman devoted to a religious life, who lives in a convent, under the three vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience. They holy time is quiet as a nun Breathless with adoration. --Wordsworth. 2. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A white variety of domestic pigeons having a veil of feathers covering the head. (b) The smew. (c) The European blue titmouse. Gray nuns (R. C. Ch.), the members of a religious order established in Montreal in 1745, whence branches were introduced into the United States in 1853; -- so called from the color or their robe, and known in religion as Sisters of Charity of Montreal. Nun buoy. See under Buoy.
Run steel
Run Run, a. 1. Melted, or made from molten material; cast in a mold; as, run butter; run iron or lead. 2. Smuggled; as, run goods. [Colloq.] --Miss Edgeworth. Run steel, malleable iron castings. See under Malleable. --Raymond.
Spun hay
Spun Spun, imp. & p. p. of Spin. Spun hay, hay twisted into ropes for convenient carriage, as on a military expedition. Spun silk, a cheap article produced from floss, or short-fibered, broken, and waste silk, carded and spun, in distinction from the long filaments wound from the cocoon. It is often mixed with cotton. Spun yarn (Naut.), a line formed of two or more rope-yarns loosely twisted.
Spun silk
Spun Spun, imp. & p. p. of Spin. Spun hay, hay twisted into ropes for convenient carriage, as on a military expedition. Spun silk, a cheap article produced from floss, or short-fibered, broken, and waste silk, carded and spun, in distinction from the long filaments wound from the cocoon. It is often mixed with cotton. Spun yarn (Naut.), a line formed of two or more rope-yarns loosely twisted.
Spun yarn
Spun Spun, imp. & p. p. of Spin. Spun hay, hay twisted into ropes for convenient carriage, as on a military expedition. Spun silk, a cheap article produced from floss, or short-fibered, broken, and waste silk, carded and spun, in distinction from the long filaments wound from the cocoon. It is often mixed with cotton. Spun yarn (Naut.), a line formed of two or more rope-yarns loosely twisted.
sun bittern
Bittern Bit"tern, n. [OE. bitoure, betore, bitter, fr. F. butor; of unknown origin.] (Zo["o]l.) A wading bird of the genus Botaurus, allied to the herons, of various species. Note: The common European bittern is Botaurus stellaris. It makes, during the brooding season, a noise called by Dryden bumping, and by Goldsmith booming. The American bittern is B. lentiginosus, and is also called stake-driver and meadow hen. See Stake-driver. Note: The name is applied to other related birds, as the least bittern (Ardetta exilis), and the sun bittern.
Sun star
Sun star Sun" star` (Zo["o]l.) See Sun star, under Sun.
To poke fun at
Poke Poke, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Poked; p. pr. & vb. n. Poking.] [Cf. LG. poken to prick, pierce, thrust, pok a dagger, knife, D. pook, G. pocken to beat, also Ir. poc a blow, Gael. puc to push.] 1. To thrust or push against or into with anything pointed; hence, to stir up; to excite; as, to poke a fire. He poked John, and said ``Sleepest thou ?' --Chaucer. 2. To thrust with the horns; to gore. 3. [From 5th Poke, 3.] To put a poke on; as, to poke an ox. [Colloq. U. S.] To poke fun, to excite fun; to joke; to jest. [Colloq.] To poke fun at, to make a butt of; to ridicule. [Colloq.]
To run a muck
Muck Muck (m[u^]k), abbreviation of Amuck. To run a muck. See Amuck.
To run a rig
Rig Rig, n. [Cf. Wriggle.] 1. A romp; a wanton; one given to unbecoming conduct. [Obs.] --Fuller. 2. A sportive or unbecoming trick; a frolic. 3. A blast of wind. [Prov. Eng.] --Wright. That uncertain season before the rigs of Michaelmas were yet well composed. --Burke. To run a rig, to play a trick; to engage in a frolic; to do something strange and unbecoming. He little dreamt when he set out Of running such a rig. --Cowper.
To run a risk
Risk Risk, n. [F. risque; cf. It. risco, risico, rischio, Pg. risco, Sp. riesgo, and also Sp. risco a steep rock; all probably fr. L. resceare to cut off; pref. re- re- + secare to cut; -- the word having been probably first used among sailors. See Section.] 1. Hazard; danger; peril; exposure to loss, injury, or destruction. The imminent and constant risk of assassination, a risk which has shaken very strong nerves. --Macaulay. 2. (Com.) Hazard of loss; liabillity to loss in property. To run a risk, to incur hazard; to encounter danger. Syn: Danger; hazard; peril; jeopardy; exposure. See Danger.
To run afoul of
Afoul A*foul", adv. & a. [Pref. a- + foul.] In collision; entangled. --Totten. To run afoul of, to run against or come into collision with, especially so as to become entangled or to cause injury.
To run down a coast
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run for an office
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run in
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run in trust
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run in with
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run mad
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run mad after
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run on
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run out
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run over
(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.' --J. H. Newman.
To run over
[Colloq.] Over the left. See under Left. To run over (Mach.), to have rotation in such direction that the crank pin traverses the upper, or front, half of its path in the forward, or outward, stroke; -- said of a crank which drives, or is driven by, a reciprocating piece.
To run riot
Riot Ri"ot, n. [OF. riote, of uncertain origin; cf. OD. revot, ravot.] 1. Wanton or unrestrained behavior; uproar; tumult. His headstrong riot hath no curb. --Shak. 2. Excessive and exxpensive feasting; wild and loose festivity; revelry. Venus loveth riot and dispense. --Chaucer. The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day. --Pope. 3. (Law) The tumultuous disturbance of the public peace by an unlawful assembly of three or more persons in the execution of some private object. To run riot, to act wantonly or without restraint.

Meaning of Un from wikipedia

- The United Nations Organization (UNO) or simply, United Nations (UN), is an intergovernmental organization responsible for maintaining international peace...
- that are members of the United Nations (UN) and have equal representation in the UN General ****embly. The UN is the world's largest intergovernmental...
- Kim Jong-un (officially transcribed Kim Jong Un; Korean: 김정은; Korean pronunciation: [kim.dzɔŋ.ɯn]; born 8 January 1983 or 1984) is a North Korean politician...
- Council (UNSC) is one of the six prin****l organs of the United Nations (UN), charged with ensuring international peace and security, accepting new members...
- List of UN numbers 0001 to 0100 List of UN numbers 0101 to 0200 List of UN numbers 0201 to 0300 List of UN numbers 0301 to 0400 List of UN numbers 0401...
- Un certain regard (French pronunciation: ​[œ̃ sɛʁtɛ̃ ʁəɡaʁ]) is a section of the Cannes Film Festival's official selection. It is run at the salle Debussy...
- interpretation. The Secretary-General is the "chief administrative officer" of the UN (Article 97) "in all meetings of the General ****embly, of the Security Council...
- UN is an abbreviation for the United Nations, an intergovernmental organization with 193 member states. UN may also refer to: UN (band), a Korean musical...
- (UN), the only one in which all member nations have equal representation, and the main deliberative, policy-making, and representative organ of the UN...
- as a sitting temporary member of the UN, which violated UN Charter Article 32; and the fighting was beyond the UN Charter's scope, because the initial...
Loading...