Definition of Tamar. Meaning of Tamar. Synonyms of Tamar

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Definition of Tamar

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Catamaran
Catamaran Cat`a*ma*ran", n. [The native East Indian name.] 1. A kind of raft or float, consisting of two or more logs or pieces of wood lashed together, and moved by paddles or sail; -- used as a surf boat and for other purposes on the coasts of the East and West Indies and South America. Modified forms are much used in the lumber regions of North America, and at life-saving stations. 2. Any vessel with twin hulls, whether propelled by sails or by steam; esp., one of a class of double-hulled pleasure boats remarkable for speed. 3. A kind of fire raft or torpedo bat. The incendiary rafts prepared by Sir Sidney Smith for destroying the French flotilla at Boulogne, 1804, were called catamarans. --Knight. 4. A quarrelsome woman; a scold. [Colloq.]
Patamar
Patamar Pat"a*mar, n. [From the native name.] (Naut.) A vessel resembling a grab, used in the coasting trade of Bombay and Ceylon. [Written also pattemar.]
Tamarack
Tamarack Tam"a*rack, n. (Bot.) (a) The American larch; also, the larch of Oregon and British Columbia (Larix occidentalis). See Hackmatack, and Larch. (b) The black pine (Pinus Murrayana) of Alaska, California, etc. It is a small tree with fine-grained wood.
tamarack
Hackmatack Hack"ma*tack`, n. [Of American Indian origin.] (Bot.) The American larch (Larix Americana), a coniferous tree with slender deciduous leaves; also, its heavy, close-grained timber. Called also tamarack.
Tamaric
Tamaric Tam"a*ric, n. [L. tamarice. See Tamarisk.] A shrub or tree supposed to be the tamarisk, or perhaps some kind of heath. [Obs.] He shall be like tamaric in the desert, and he shall not see when good shall come. --Jer. xvii. 6 (Douay version).
Tamarin
Tamarin Tam"a*rin, n. [From the native name in Cayenne.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small squirrel-like South American monkeys of the genus Midas, especially M. ursulus.
Tamarind
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.
Tamarind fish
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.
Tamarindus Indica
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.
Tamarisk
Tamarisk Tam"a*risk, n. [L. tamariscus, also tamarix, tamarice, Skr. tam[=a]la, tam[=a]laka, a tree with a very dark bark; cf. tamas darkness: cf. F. tamarisc, tamarix, tamaris.] (Bot.) Any shrub or tree of the genus Tamarix, the species of which are European and Asiatic. They have minute scalelike leaves, and small flowers in spikes. An Arabian species (T. mannifera) is the source of one kind of manna. Tamarisk salt tree, an East Indian tree (Tamarix orientalis) which produces an incrustation of salt.
Tamarisk salt tree
Tamarisk Tam"a*risk, n. [L. tamariscus, also tamarix, tamarice, Skr. tam[=a]la, tam[=a]laka, a tree with a very dark bark; cf. tamas darkness: cf. F. tamarisc, tamarix, tamaris.] (Bot.) Any shrub or tree of the genus Tamarix, the species of which are European and Asiatic. They have minute scalelike leaves, and small flowers in spikes. An Arabian species (T. mannifera) is the source of one kind of manna. Tamarisk salt tree, an East Indian tree (Tamarix orientalis) which produces an incrustation of salt.
Tamarix orientalis
Tamarisk Tam"a*risk, n. [L. tamariscus, also tamarix, tamarice, Skr. tam[=a]la, tam[=a]laka, a tree with a very dark bark; cf. tamas darkness: cf. F. tamarisc, tamarix, tamaris.] (Bot.) Any shrub or tree of the genus Tamarix, the species of which are European and Asiatic. They have minute scalelike leaves, and small flowers in spikes. An Arabian species (T. mannifera) is the source of one kind of manna. Tamarisk salt tree, an East Indian tree (Tamarix orientalis) which produces an incrustation of salt.
Tintamar
Tintamar Tin`ta*mar", n. [F. tintamarre.] A hideous or confused noise; an uproar. [Obs.] --Howell.
Velvet tamarind
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.
Wild tamarind
Tamarind Tam"a*rind, n. [It. tamarindo, or Sp. tamarindo, or Pg. tamarindo, tamarinho, from Ar. tamarhind[=i], literally, Indian date; tamar a dried date + Hind India: cf. F. tamarin. Cf. Hindu.] (Bot.) 1. A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated. 2. One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink. Tamarind fish, a preparation of a variety of East Indian fish with the acid pulp of the tamarind fruit. Velvet tamarind. (a) A West African leguminous tree (Codarium acutifolium). (b) One of the small black velvety pods, which are used for food in Sierra Leone. Wild tamarind (Bot.), a name given to certain trees somewhat resembling the tamarind, as the Lysiloma latisiliqua of Southern Florida, and the Pithecolobium filicifolium of the West Indies.

Meaning of Tamar from wikipedia

- Tamar may refer to: Tamar (album), by Tamar Braxton, 2000 Tamar (novel), by Mal Peet, 2005 "Tamar", a poem by Robinson Jeffers Tamar (name), including...
- Ashley Támar Davis, known professionally as Támar, is an American singer who came to prominence through her ****ociation with Prince. She sang the co-lead...
- Tamar Estine Braxton (born March 17, 1977) is an American singer and television personality. Braxton began her career in 1990 as a founding member of...
- In the Book of Genesis, Tamar (/ˈteɪmər/; Hebrew: תָּמָר‎, Modern: Tamar pronounced [taˈmaʁ], Tiberian: Tāmār pronounced [tɔˈmɔr], date palm) was the...
- The Tamar (/ˈteɪmɑːr/; Cornish: Dowr Tamar) is a river in south west England, that forms most of the border between Devon (to the east) and Cornwall (to...
- Tamar the Great (Georgian: თამარ მეფე) (c. 1160 – 18 January 1213) reigned as the Queen of Georgia from 1184 to 1213, presiding over the apex of the Georgian...
- Tamar-kali (born Tamara Colletta Brown) is an American rock singer-songwriter and composer based in Brooklyn, New York. Tamar-kali was born and raised...
- Tamar (Hebrew: תמר‎) is a female name of Hebrew origin, meaning "date" (the fruit), "date palm" or just "palm tree". There are three characters in the...
- station of the Royal Navy have been called HMS Tamar, after the River Tamar in South West England: HMS Tamar (1758) was a 16-gun sloop launched at Saltash...
- Tamar is a figure described in 2 Samuel in the Hebrew Bible. In the biblical narrative, she is the daughter of King David, and sister of Absalom. In 2...
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