Definition of Scope. Meaning of Scope. Synonyms of Scope

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Definition of Scope

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Aeroscope
Aeroscope A"["e]r*o*scope, n. [A["e]ro- + Gr. ? to look out.] (Biol.) An apparatus designed for collecting spores, germs, bacteria, etc., suspended in the air.
AEthrioscope
AEthrioscope [AE]"thri*o*scope, n. [Gr. ? clear + ? to observe.] An instrument consisting in part of a differential thermometer. It is used for measuring changes of temperature produced by different conditions of the sky, as when clear or clouded.
Alethoscope
Alethoscope A*leth"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? true + ? to view.] An instrument for viewing pictures by means of a lens, so as to present them in their natural proportions and relations.
Altiscope
Altiscope Al"ti*scope, n. [L. altus high + Gr. ? to view.] An arrangement of lenses and mirrors which enables a person to see an object in spite of intervening objects.
Anamorphoscope
Anamorphoscope An`a*mor"pho*scope, n. [Anamorphosis + -scope.] An instrument for restoring a picture or image distorted by anamorphosis to its normal proportions. It usually consists of a cylindrical mirror.
Angioscope
Angioscope An"gi*o*scope ([a^]n"j[i^]*[-o]*sk[=o]p), n. [Angio- + -scope.] An instrument for examining the capillary vessels of animals and plants. --Morin.
Astroscope
Astroscope As"tro*scope, n. [Astro- + scope.] An old astronomical instrument, formed of two cones, on whose surface the constellations were delineated.
Auriscope
Auriscope Au"ri*scope (-sk[=o]p), n. [L. auris + -scope.] (Med.) An instrument for examining the condition of the ear.
Baroscope
Baroscope Bar"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? weight + -scope: cf. F. baroscope.] Any instrument showing the changes in the weight of the atmosphere; also, less appropriately, any instrument that indicates -or foreshadows changes of the weather, as a deep vial of liquid holding in suspension some substance which rises and falls with atmospheric changes.
bioscope
Cinematograph Cin`e*mat"o*graph, n. [Gr. ?, ?, motion + -graph.] 1. A machine, combining magic lantern and kinetoscope features, for projecting on a screen a series of pictures, moved rapidly (25 to 50 a second) and intermittently before an objective lens, and producing by persistence of vision the illusion of continuous motion; a moving-picture machine; also, any of several other machines or devices producing moving pictorial effects. Other common names for the cinematograph are animatograph, biograph, bioscope, electrograph, electroscope, kinematograph, kinetoscope, veriscope, vitagraph, vitascope, zo["o]gyroscope, zo["o]praxiscope, etc.
Ceraunoscope
Ceraunoscope Ce*rau"no*scope, n. [Gr. ? thunder and lightning + -scope.] An instrument or apparatus employed in the ancient mysteries to imitate thunder and lightning. --T. Moore.
Chromascope
Chromascope Chro"ma*scope, n. [Gr. ? color + -scope.] An instrument for showing the optical effects of color.
Chromatoscope
Chromatoscope Chro"ma*to*scope`, n. [Gr. ?, ?, color + -scope.] (Astron.) A reflecting telescope, part of which is made to rotate eccentrically, so as to produce a ringlike image of a star, instead of a point; -- used in studying the scintillation of the stars.
Chronoscope
Chronoscope Chron"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? time + -scope.] An instrument for measuring minute intervals of time; used in determining the velocity of projectiles, the duration of short-lived luminous phenomena, etc.
Compound microscope
Microscope Mi"cro*scope, n. [Micro- + -scope.] An optical instrument, consisting of a lens, or combination of lenses, for making an enlarged image of an object which is too minute to be viewed by the naked eye. Compound microscope, an instrument consisting of a combination of lenses such that the image formed by the lens or set of lenses nearest the object (called the objective) is magnified by another lens called the ocular or eyepiece. Oxyhydrogen microscope, and Solar microscope. See under Oxyhydrogen, and Solar. Simple, or Single, microscope, a single convex lens used to magnify objects placed in its focus.
Compound microscope
Compound Com"pound, a. [OE. compouned, p. p. of compounen. See Compound, v. t.] Composed of two or more elements, ingredients, parts; produced by the union of several ingredients, parts, or things; composite; as, a compound word. Compound substances are made up of two or more simple substances. --I. Watts. Compound addition, subtraction, multiplication, division (Arith.), the addition, subtraction, etc., of compound numbers. Compound crystal (Crystallog.), a twin crystal, or one seeming to be made up of two or more crystals combined according to regular laws of composition. Compound engine (Mech.), a form of steam engine in which the steam that has been used in a high-pressure cylinder is made to do further service in a larger low-pressure cylinder, sometimes in several larger cylinders, successively. Compound ether. (Chem.) See under Ether. Compound flower (Bot.), a flower head resembling a single flower, but really composed of several florets inclosed in a common calyxlike involucre, as the sunflower or dandelion. Compound fraction. (Math.) See Fraction. Compound fracture. See Fracture. Compound householder, a householder who compounds or arranges with his landlord that his rates shall be included in his rents. [Eng.] Compound interest. See Interest. Compound larceny. (Law) See Larceny. Compound leaf (Bot.), a leaf having two or more separate blades or leaflets on a common leafstalk. Compound microscope. See Microscope. Compound motion. See Motion. Compound number (Math.), one constructed according to a varying scale of denomination; as, 3 cwt., 1 qr., 5 lb.; -- called also denominate number. Compound pier (Arch.), a clustered column. Compound quantity (Alg.), a quantity composed of two or more simple quantities or terms, connected by the sign + (plus) or - (minus). Thus, a + b - c, and bb - b, are compound quantities. Compound radical. (Chem.) See Radical. Compound ratio (Math.), the product of two or more ratios; thus ab:cd is a ratio compounded of the simple ratios a:c and b:d. Compound rest (Mech.), the tool carriage of an engine lathe. Compound screw (Mech.), a screw having on the same axis two or more screws with different pitch (a differential screw), or running in different directions (a right and left screw). Compound time (Mus.), that in which two or more simple measures are combined in one; as, 6-8 time is the joining of two measures of 3-8 time. Compound word, a word composed of two or more words; specifically, two or more words joined together by a hyphen.
Cyclonoscope
Cyclonoscope Cy*clo"no*scope, n. [Cyclone + -scope.] An apparatus to assist in locating the center of a cyclone.
Cycloscope
Cycloscope Cy"clo*scope (s?"kl?-sk?p), n. [Cyclo- + -scope.] A machine for measuring at any moment velocity of rotation, as of a wheel of a steam engine. --Knight.
Cymoscope
Cymoscope Cy"mo*scope, n. [Gr. ? wave + -scope.] (Elec.) Any device for detecting the presence of electric waves. The influence of electric waves on the resistance of a particular kind of electric circuit, on the magnetization of steel, on the polarization of an electrolytic cell, or on the electric condition of a vacuum has been applied in the various cymoscopes.
Debuscope
Debuscope De"bu*scope, n. [From the inventor, Debus, a French optician + -scope.] (Opt.) A modification of the kaleidoscope; -- used to reflect images so as to form beautiful designs.
Dialytic telescope
Dialytic Di`a*lyt"ic, a. [Gr. ?, fr. ?. See Dialysis.] Having the quality of unloosing or separating. --Clarke. Dialytic telescope, an achromatic telescope in which the colored dispersion produced by a single object lens of crown glass is corrected by a smaller concave lens, or combination of lenses, of high dispersive power, placed at a distance in the narrower part of the converging cone of rays, usually near the middle of the tube.
Diaphanoscope
Diaphanoscope Di`a*phan"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? transparent + -scope.] (Photog.) A dark box constructed for viewing transparent pictures, with or without a lens.
Dichroiscope
Dichroiscope Di*chro"i*scope, n. Same as Dichroscope.
Dichroscope
Dichroscope Di"chro*scope, n. [Gr. di- = di`s- twice + ? color + ? to view.] An instrument for examining the dichroism of crystals.
Ebullioscope
Ebullioscope E*bul"li*o*scope, n. [L. ebullire to boil up + -scope.] (Phys. Chem.) An instrument for observing the boiling point of liquids, especially for determining the alcoholic strength of a mixture by the temperature at which it boils.
Echoscope
Echoscope Ech"o*scope, n. [Gr. ?, ?, sound + -scope.] (Med.) An instrument for intensifying sounds produced by percussion of the thorax. --Knight.
electroscope
Cinematograph Cin`e*mat"o*graph, n. [Gr. ?, ?, motion + -graph.] 1. A machine, combining magic lantern and kinetoscope features, for projecting on a screen a series of pictures, moved rapidly (25 to 50 a second) and intermittently before an objective lens, and producing by persistence of vision the illusion of continuous motion; a moving-picture machine; also, any of several other machines or devices producing moving pictorial effects. Other common names for the cinematograph are animatograph, biograph, bioscope, electrograph, electroscope, kinematograph, kinetoscope, veriscope, vitagraph, vitascope, zo["o]gyroscope, zo["o]praxiscope, etc.
Endoscope
Endoscope En"do*scope, n. [Endo- + -scope.] (Med.) An instrument for examining the interior of the rectum, the urethra, and the bladder.
Engiscope
Engiscope En"gi*scope, n. [Gr. ? near + -scope.] (Opt.) A kind of reflecting microscope. [Obs.]
equatorial telescope
Equatorial E`qua*to"ri*al, n. (Astron.) An instrument consisting of a telescope so mounted as to have two axes of motion at right angles to each other, one of them parallel to the axis of the earth, and each carrying a graduated circle, the one for measuring declination, and the other right ascension, or the hour angle, so that the telescope may be directed, even in the daytime, to any star or other object whose right ascension and declination are known. The motion in right ascension is sometimes communicated by clockwork, so as to keep the object constantly in the field of the telescope. Called also an equatorial telescope. Note: The term equatorial, or equatorial instrument, is sometimes applied to any astronomical instrument which has its principal axis of rotation parallel to the axis of the earth.

Meaning of Scope from wikipedia

- scope may refer to many different devices or viewing instruments, constructed for many different purposes. Scope or scopes may refer to: Jamie Scope,...
- last official version of SCOP is 1.75 (released June 2009). Since then SCOPe from UC Berkeley has been responsible for updating the database in a compatible...
- Wiktionary's entry on "-scope" instead. You can also search for -scope in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings. Start the -scope article, using...
- Scope is a brand of mouthwash made by Procter & Gamble. It was introduced in 1966, and for many years has been positioned in the marketplace as the purportedly...
- The Scope may refer to: The Scope at Ryerson is an internet radio station and ****ure AM radio station CJRU to be operated at Ryerson University in Toronto...
- In computer programming, the scope of a name binding – an ****ociation of a name to an entity, such as a variable – is the region of a computer program...
- Scopely, Inc is an interactive entertainment company and mobile games developer and publisher. The company is headquartered in Los Angeles, California...
- A spotting scope is a small portable high-power telescope with added optics to present an erect image, optimized for the observation of terrestrial objects...
- A telescopic sight, commonly called a scope, is an optical sighting device that is based on a refracting telescope. It is equipped with some form of graphic...
- Scope creep (also called requirement creep, or kitchen sink syndrome) in project management refers to changes, continuous or uncontrolled growth in a...
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