Definition of Pensa. Meaning of Pensa. Synonyms of Pensa

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Definition of Pensa

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Compensate
Compensate Com"pen*sate, v. i. To make amends; to supply an equivalent; -- followed by for; as, nothing can compensate for the loss of reputation.
Compensate
Compensate Com"pen*sate (? or ?; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Compensated; p. pr. & vb. n. Compensating.] [L. compensatus, p. p. of compensare, prop., to weigh several things with one another, to balance with one another, verb intens. fr. compendere. See Compendium.] 1. To make equal return to; to remunerate; to recompense; to give an equivalent to; to requite suitably; as, to compensate a laborer for his work, or a merchant for his losses. 2. To be equivalent in value or effect to; to counterbalance; to make up for; to make amends for. The length of the night and the dews thereof do compensate the heat of the day. --Bacon. The pleasures of life do not compensate the miseries. --Prior. Syn: To recompense; remunerate; indemnify; reward; requite; counterbalance.
Compensated
Compensate Com"pen*sate (? or ?; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Compensated; p. pr. & vb. n. Compensating.] [L. compensatus, p. p. of compensare, prop., to weigh several things with one another, to balance with one another, verb intens. fr. compendere. See Compendium.] 1. To make equal return to; to remunerate; to recompense; to give an equivalent to; to requite suitably; as, to compensate a laborer for his work, or a merchant for his losses. 2. To be equivalent in value or effect to; to counterbalance; to make up for; to make amends for. The length of the night and the dews thereof do compensate the heat of the day. --Bacon. The pleasures of life do not compensate the miseries. --Prior. Syn: To recompense; remunerate; indemnify; reward; requite; counterbalance.
Compensated balance
Compensation Com`pen*sa"tion, n. [L. compensatio a weighing, a balancing of accounts.] 1. The act or principle of compensating. --Emerson. 2. That which constitutes, or is regarded as, an equivalent; that which makes good the lack or variation of something else; that which compensates for loss or privation; amends; remuneration; recompense. The parliament which dissolved the monastic foundations . . . vouchsafed not a word toward securing the slightest compensation to the dispossessed owners. --Hallam. No pecuniary compensation can possibly reward them. --Burke. 3. (Law) (a) The extinction of debts of which two persons are reciprocally debtors by the credits of which they are reciprocally creditors; the payment of a debt by a credit of equal amount; a set-off. --Bouvier. --Wharton. (b) A recompense or reward for some loss or service. (c) An equivalent stipulated for in contracts for the sale of real estate, in which it is customary to provide that errors in description, etc., shall not avoid, but shall be the subject of compensation. Compensation balance, or Compensated balance, a kind of balance wheel for a timepiece. The rim is usually made of two different metals having different expansibility under changes of temperature, so arranged as to counteract each other and preserve uniformity of movement. Compensation pendulum. See Pendulum. Syn: Recompense; reward; indemnification; consideration; requital; satisfaction; set-off.
Compensating
Compensate Com"pen*sate (? or ?; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Compensated; p. pr. & vb. n. Compensating.] [L. compensatus, p. p. of compensare, prop., to weigh several things with one another, to balance with one another, verb intens. fr. compendere. See Compendium.] 1. To make equal return to; to remunerate; to recompense; to give an equivalent to; to requite suitably; as, to compensate a laborer for his work, or a merchant for his losses. 2. To be equivalent in value or effect to; to counterbalance; to make up for; to make amends for. The length of the night and the dews thereof do compensate the heat of the day. --Bacon. The pleasures of life do not compensate the miseries. --Prior. Syn: To recompense; remunerate; indemnify; reward; requite; counterbalance.
Compensation
Compensation Com`pen*sa"tion, n. [L. compensatio a weighing, a balancing of accounts.] 1. The act or principle of compensating. --Emerson. 2. That which constitutes, or is regarded as, an equivalent; that which makes good the lack or variation of something else; that which compensates for loss or privation; amends; remuneration; recompense. The parliament which dissolved the monastic foundations . . . vouchsafed not a word toward securing the slightest compensation to the dispossessed owners. --Hallam. No pecuniary compensation can possibly reward them. --Burke. 3. (Law) (a) The extinction of debts of which two persons are reciprocally debtors by the credits of which they are reciprocally creditors; the payment of a debt by a credit of equal amount; a set-off. --Bouvier. --Wharton. (b) A recompense or reward for some loss or service. (c) An equivalent stipulated for in contracts for the sale of real estate, in which it is customary to provide that errors in description, etc., shall not avoid, but shall be the subject of compensation. Compensation balance, or Compensated balance, a kind of balance wheel for a timepiece. The rim is usually made of two different metals having different expansibility under changes of temperature, so arranged as to counteract each other and preserve uniformity of movement. Compensation pendulum. See Pendulum. Syn: Recompense; reward; indemnification; consideration; requital; satisfaction; set-off.
Compensation balance
Compensation Com`pen*sa"tion, n. [L. compensatio a weighing, a balancing of accounts.] 1. The act or principle of compensating. --Emerson. 2. That which constitutes, or is regarded as, an equivalent; that which makes good the lack or variation of something else; that which compensates for loss or privation; amends; remuneration; recompense. The parliament which dissolved the monastic foundations . . . vouchsafed not a word toward securing the slightest compensation to the dispossessed owners. --Hallam. No pecuniary compensation can possibly reward them. --Burke. 3. (Law) (a) The extinction of debts of which two persons are reciprocally debtors by the credits of which they are reciprocally creditors; the payment of a debt by a credit of equal amount; a set-off. --Bouvier. --Wharton. (b) A recompense or reward for some loss or service. (c) An equivalent stipulated for in contracts for the sale of real estate, in which it is customary to provide that errors in description, etc., shall not avoid, but shall be the subject of compensation. Compensation balance, or Compensated balance, a kind of balance wheel for a timepiece. The rim is usually made of two different metals having different expansibility under changes of temperature, so arranged as to counteract each other and preserve uniformity of movement. Compensation pendulum. See Pendulum. Syn: Recompense; reward; indemnification; consideration; requital; satisfaction; set-off.
Compensation pendulum
Pendulum Pen"du*lum, n.; pl. Pendulums. [NL., fr. L. pendulus hanging, swinging. See Pendulous.] A body so suspended from a fixed point as to swing freely to and fro by the alternate action of gravity and momentum. It is used to regulate the movements of clockwork and other machinery. Note: The time of oscillation of a pendulum is independent of the arc of vibration, provided this arc be small. Ballistic pendulum. See under Ballistic. Compensation pendulum, a clock pendulum in which the effect of changes of temperature of the length of the rod is so counteracted, usually by the opposite expansion of differene metals, that the distance of the center of oscillation from the center of suspension remains invariable; as, the mercurial compensation pendulum, in which the expansion of the rod is compensated by the opposite expansion of mercury in a jar constituting the bob; the gridiron pendulum, in which compensation is effected by the opposite expansion of sets of rodsof different metals. Compound pendulum, an ordinary pendulum; -- so called, as being made up of different parts, and contrasted with simple pendulum. Conical or Revolving, pendulum, a weight connected by a rod with a fixed point; and revolving in a horizontal cyrcle about the vertical from that point. Pendulum bob, the weight at the lower end of a pendulum. Pendulum level, a plumb level. See under Level. Pendulum wheel, the balance of a watch. Simple or Theoretical, pendulum, an imaginary pendulum having no dimensions except length, and no weight except at the center of oscillation; in other words, a material point suspended by an ideal line.
Compensation pendulum
Compensation Com`pen*sa"tion, n. [L. compensatio a weighing, a balancing of accounts.] 1. The act or principle of compensating. --Emerson. 2. That which constitutes, or is regarded as, an equivalent; that which makes good the lack or variation of something else; that which compensates for loss or privation; amends; remuneration; recompense. The parliament which dissolved the monastic foundations . . . vouchsafed not a word toward securing the slightest compensation to the dispossessed owners. --Hallam. No pecuniary compensation can possibly reward them. --Burke. 3. (Law) (a) The extinction of debts of which two persons are reciprocally debtors by the credits of which they are reciprocally creditors; the payment of a debt by a credit of equal amount; a set-off. --Bouvier. --Wharton. (b) A recompense or reward for some loss or service. (c) An equivalent stipulated for in contracts for the sale of real estate, in which it is customary to provide that errors in description, etc., shall not avoid, but shall be the subject of compensation. Compensation balance, or Compensated balance, a kind of balance wheel for a timepiece. The rim is usually made of two different metals having different expansibility under changes of temperature, so arranged as to counteract each other and preserve uniformity of movement. Compensation pendulum. See Pendulum. Syn: Recompense; reward; indemnification; consideration; requital; satisfaction; set-off.
Compensative
Compensative Com*pen"sa*tive, n. Compensation. [R.] --Lamb.
Compensative
Compensative Com*pen"sa*tive, a. [LL. compensativus.] Affording compensation.
compensator
Autotransformer Au`to*trans*form"er, n. [Auto- + transformer.] (Elec.) A transformer in which part of the primary winding is used as a secondary winding, or vice versa; -- called also a compensator or balancing coil.
Compensatory
Compensatory Com*pen"sa*to*ry, a. Serving for compensation; making amends. --Jer. Taylor.
Dispensable
Dispensable Dis*pen"sa*ble, a. [LL. dispensabilis. See Dispense.] 1. Capable of being dispensed or administered. 2. Capable of being dispensed with. --Coleridge.
Dispensableness
Dispensableness Dis*pen"sa*ble*ness, n. Quality of being dispensable.
Dispensaries
Dispensary Dis*pen"sa*ry, n.; pl. Dispensaries. [Cf. F. dispensaire.] 1. A place where medicines are prepared and dispensed; esp., a place where the poor can obtain medical advice and medicines gratuitously or at a nominal price. 2. A dispensatory. --Pope.
Dispensary
Dispensary Dis*pen"sa*ry, n.; pl. Dispensaries. [Cf. F. dispensaire.] 1. A place where medicines are prepared and dispensed; esp., a place where the poor can obtain medical advice and medicines gratuitously or at a nominal price. 2. A dispensatory. --Pope.
Dispensative
Dispensative Dis*pen"sa*tive, a. [Cf. F. dispensatif.] Granting dispensation.
Dispensatively
Dispensatively Dis*pen"sa*tive*ly, adv. By dispensation. --Wotton.
Dispensator
Dispensator Dis"pen*sa`tor, n. [L.] A distributer; a dispenser. --Bacon.
Dispensatories
Dispensatory Dis*pen"sa*to*ry, n.; pl. Dispensatories. A book or medicinal formulary containing a systematic description of drugs, and of preparations made from them. It is usually, but not always, distinguished from a pharmacop[oe]ia in that it issued by private parties, and not by an official body or by government.
Dispensatorily
Dispensatorily Dis*pen"sa*to*ri*ly, adv. In the way of dispensation; dispensatively.
Dispensatory
Dispensatory Dis*pen"sa*to*ry, a. [L. dispensatorius relating to management. See Dispense, v. t.] Granting, or authorized to grant, dispensations. ``Dispensatory power.' --Bp. Rainbow.
Dispensatory
Dispensatory Dis*pen"sa*to*ry, n.; pl. Dispensatories. A book or medicinal formulary containing a systematic description of drugs, and of preparations made from them. It is usually, but not always, distinguished from a pharmacop[oe]ia in that it issued by private parties, and not by an official body or by government.
Equipensate
Equipensate E`qui*pen"sate, v. t. [Equi- + pensatus, p. p. of pensare to weigh. Cf. Equipoise.] To weigh equally; to esteem alike. [Obs.]
Indispensable
Indispensable In`dis*pen"sa*ble, a. [Pref. in- not + dispensable: cf. F. indispensable.] 1. Not dispensable; impossible to be omitted, remitted, or spared; absolutely necessary or requisite. 2. (Eccl.) Not admitting dispensation; not subject to release or exemption. [R.] The law was moral and indispensable. --Bp. Burnet. 3. Unavoidable; inevitable. [Obs.] --Fuller.
Indispensableness
Indispensableness In`dis*pen"sa*ble*ness, n. The state or quality of being indispensable, or absolutely necessary. --S. Clarke.
Indispensably
Indispensably In`dis*pen"sa*bly, adv. In an indispensable manner. ``Indispensably necessary.' --Bp. Warburton.
Patriarchal dispensation
Patriarchal Pa`tri*ar"chal, a. [Cf. F. patriarcal.] 1. Of or pertaining to a patriarch or to patriarchs; possessed by, or subject to, patriarchs; as, patriarchal authority or jurisdiction; a patriarchal see; a patriarchal church. 2. Characteristic of a patriarch; venerable. About whose patriarchal knee Late the little children clung. --Tennyson. 3. (Ethnol.) Having an organization of society and government in which the head of the family exercises authority over all its generations. Patriarchal cross (Her.), a cross, the shaft of which is intersected by two transverse beams, the upper one being the smaller. See Illust. (2) of Cross. Patriarchal dispensation, the divine dispensation under which the patriarchs lived before the law given by Moses.
Pensative
Pensative Pen"sa*tive, a. Pensive. [Obs.] --Shelton.

Meaning of Pensa from wikipedia

- based in New York City. Pensa Custom Guitars was founded by Argentine businessman Rudy Pensa. In 1980, Mark Knopfler and Rudy Pensa met at Rudys Music Stop...
- Pensa is the present tense third person conjugation for the verb pensar ("to think") of the Portuguese language. It may also refer to: Pensa, Burkina Faso...
- Pensa (also, Ponsa and Pinsa) is a town in Bam Province, Burkina Faso. Coordinates: 13°38′26″N 0°48′34″W / 13.64056°N 0.80944°W / 13.64056; -0.80944...
- Pensa is a department or commune of Sanmatenga Province in central Burkina Faso. Its capital lies at the town of Pensa. Burkinabé government inforoute...
- Martin Pensa is a film editor. Pensa and fellow film editor Jean-Marc Vallée (as John Mac McMurphy) were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Film...
- Genius. Retrieved 11 April 2019. ""Pensa Bem" é o mais recente single de TAY" (in Portuguese). Retrieved 11 April 2019. Pensa Bem (feat. Dylan) – Single by...
- Pietro Pensa (Esino Lario, 1906 – Bellano, 1996) was an Italian civil engineer and historian, who served as mayor of Esino Lario. He contributed scholarly...
- is a genus of wrinkled bark beetles in the family Carabidae. Tangarona pensa, found in New Zealand, is the only species of this genus. "Tangarona R.T...
- D76 may refer to: D. 76, Aria "Pensa, che questo istante" ('Pensa, che questo istante') for b**** and piano by Franz Schubert HMS Virago (D76) or HMS Virago...
- UEFA Euro 2028". bnr.bg. 25 February 2019. "Euro 2028 in Italia: la FIGC pensa alla candidatura ma ci sono dei problemi" (in Italian). Calcio News 24....
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