Definition of Mortis. Meaning of Mortis. Synonyms of Mortis

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Mortis. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Mortis and, of course, Mortis synonyms and on the right images related to the word Mortis.

Definition of Mortis

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Amortisable
Amortise A*mor"tise, v., Amortisation A*mor`ti*sa"tion, n., Amortisable A*mor"tis*a*ble, a., Amortisement A*mor"tise*ment, n. Same as Amortize, Amortization, etc.
Amortisation
Amortise A*mor"tise, v., Amortisation A*mor`ti*sa"tion, n., Amortisable A*mor"tis*a*ble, a., Amortisement A*mor"tise*ment, n. Same as Amortize, Amortization, etc.
Amortise
Amortise A*mor"tise, v., Amortisation A*mor`ti*sa"tion, n., Amortisable A*mor"tis*a*ble, a., Amortisement A*mor"tise*ment, n. Same as Amortize, Amortization, etc.
Amortisement
Amortise A*mor"tise, v., Amortisation A*mor`ti*sa"tion, n., Amortisable A*mor"tis*a*ble, a., Amortisement A*mor"tise*ment, n. Same as Amortize, Amortization, etc.
Mortise
Mortise Mor"tise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mortised; p. pr. & vb. n. Mortising.] 1. To cut or make a mortisein. 2. To join or fasten by a tenon and mortise; as, to mortise a beam into a post, or a joist into a girder.
Mortise
Mortise Mor"tise, n. [F. mortaise; cf. Sp. mortaja, Ar. murtazz fixed, or W. mortais, Ir. mortis, moirtis, Gael. moirteis.] A cavity cut into a piece of timber, or other material, to receive something (as the end of another piece) made to fit it, and called a tenon. Mortise and tenon (Carp.), made with a mortise and tenon; joined or united by means of a mortise and tenon; -- used adjectively. Mortise joint, a joint made by a mortise and tenon. Mortise lock. See under Lock. Mortise wheel, a cast-iron wheel, with wooden clogs inserted in mortises on its face or edge; -- also called mortise gear, and core gear.
Mortise and tenon
Mortise Mor"tise, n. [F. mortaise; cf. Sp. mortaja, Ar. murtazz fixed, or W. mortais, Ir. mortis, moirtis, Gael. moirteis.] A cavity cut into a piece of timber, or other material, to receive something (as the end of another piece) made to fit it, and called a tenon. Mortise and tenon (Carp.), made with a mortise and tenon; joined or united by means of a mortise and tenon; -- used adjectively. Mortise joint, a joint made by a mortise and tenon. Mortise lock. See under Lock. Mortise wheel, a cast-iron wheel, with wooden clogs inserted in mortises on its face or edge; -- also called mortise gear, and core gear.
mortise gear
Mortise Mor"tise, n. [F. mortaise; cf. Sp. mortaja, Ar. murtazz fixed, or W. mortais, Ir. mortis, moirtis, Gael. moirteis.] A cavity cut into a piece of timber, or other material, to receive something (as the end of another piece) made to fit it, and called a tenon. Mortise and tenon (Carp.), made with a mortise and tenon; joined or united by means of a mortise and tenon; -- used adjectively. Mortise joint, a joint made by a mortise and tenon. Mortise lock. See under Lock. Mortise wheel, a cast-iron wheel, with wooden clogs inserted in mortises on its face or edge; -- also called mortise gear, and core gear.
Mortise joint
Mortise Mor"tise, n. [F. mortaise; cf. Sp. mortaja, Ar. murtazz fixed, or W. mortais, Ir. mortis, moirtis, Gael. moirteis.] A cavity cut into a piece of timber, or other material, to receive something (as the end of another piece) made to fit it, and called a tenon. Mortise and tenon (Carp.), made with a mortise and tenon; joined or united by means of a mortise and tenon; -- used adjectively. Mortise joint, a joint made by a mortise and tenon. Mortise lock. See under Lock. Mortise wheel, a cast-iron wheel, with wooden clogs inserted in mortises on its face or edge; -- also called mortise gear, and core gear.
Mortise lock
Lock Lock, n. [AS. loc inclosure, an inclosed place, the fastening of a door, fr. l[=u]can to lock, fasten; akin to OS. l[=u]kan (in comp.), D. luiken, OHG. l[=u]hhan, Icel. l?ka, Goth. l[=u]kan (in comp.); cf. Skr. ruj to break. Cf. Locket.] 1. Anything that fastens; specifically, a fastening, as for a door, a lid, a trunk, a drawer, and the like, in which a bolt is moved by a key so as to hold or to release the thing fastened. 2. A fastening together or interlacing; a closing of one thing upon another; a state of being fixed or immovable. Albemarle Street closed by a lock of carriages. --De Quincey. 3. A place from which egress is prevented, as by a lock. --Dryden. 4. The barrier or works which confine the water of a stream or canal. 5. An inclosure in a canal with gates at each end, used in raising or lowering boats as they pass from one level to another; -- called also lift lock. 6. That part or apparatus of a firearm by which the charge is exploded; as, a matchlock, flintlock, percussion lock, etc. 7. A device for keeping a wheel from turning. 8. A grapple in wrestling. --Milton. Detector lock, a lock containing a contrivance for showing whether it as has been tampered with. Lock bay (Canals), the body of water in a lock chamber. Lock chamber, the inclosed space between the gates of a canal lock. Lock nut. See Check nut, under Check. Lock plate, a plate to which the mechanism of a gunlock is attached. Lock rail (Arch.), in ordinary paneled doors, the rail nearest the lock. Lock rand (Masonry), a range of bond stone. --Knight. Mortise lock, a door lock inserted in a mortise. Rim lock, a lock fastened to the face of a door, thus differing from a mortise lock.
Mortise lock
Mortise Mor"tise, n. [F. mortaise; cf. Sp. mortaja, Ar. murtazz fixed, or W. mortais, Ir. mortis, moirtis, Gael. moirteis.] A cavity cut into a piece of timber, or other material, to receive something (as the end of another piece) made to fit it, and called a tenon. Mortise and tenon (Carp.), made with a mortise and tenon; joined or united by means of a mortise and tenon; -- used adjectively. Mortise joint, a joint made by a mortise and tenon. Mortise lock. See under Lock. Mortise wheel, a cast-iron wheel, with wooden clogs inserted in mortises on its face or edge; -- also called mortise gear, and core gear.
Mortise wheel
Mortise Mor"tise, n. [F. mortaise; cf. Sp. mortaja, Ar. murtazz fixed, or W. mortais, Ir. mortis, moirtis, Gael. moirteis.] A cavity cut into a piece of timber, or other material, to receive something (as the end of another piece) made to fit it, and called a tenon. Mortise and tenon (Carp.), made with a mortise and tenon; joined or united by means of a mortise and tenon; -- used adjectively. Mortise joint, a joint made by a mortise and tenon. Mortise lock. See under Lock. Mortise wheel, a cast-iron wheel, with wooden clogs inserted in mortises on its face or edge; -- also called mortise gear, and core gear.
Mortised
Mortise Mor"tise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mortised; p. pr. & vb. n. Mortising.] 1. To cut or make a mortisein. 2. To join or fasten by a tenon and mortise; as, to mortise a beam into a post, or a joist into a girder.
Mortising
Mortise Mor"tise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mortised; p. pr. & vb. n. Mortising.] 1. To cut or make a mortisein. 2. To join or fasten by a tenon and mortise; as, to mortise a beam into a post, or a joist into a girder.
Rigor mortis
Rigor Ri"gor, n. [L. See Rigor., below.] 1. Rigidity; stiffness. 2. (ed.) A sense of chilliness, with contraction of the skin; a convulsive shuddering or tremor, as in the chill preceding a fever. Rigor caloris[L., rigor of heat] (Physiol.), a form of rigor mortis induced by heat, as when the muscle of a mammal is heated to about 50[deg]C. Rigor mortis[L., rigor of death], death stiffening; the rigidity of the muscles that occurs at death and lasts till decomposition sets in. It is due to the formation of myosin by the coagulation of the contents of the individual muscle fibers.
Stub mortise
Stub Stub, n. [OE. stubbe, AS. stub, styb; akin to D. stobbe, LG. stubbe, Dan. stub, Sw. stubbe, Icel. stubbr, stubbi; cf. Gr. ?.] 1. The stump of a tree; that part of a tree or plant which remains fixed in the earth when the stem is cut down; -- applied especially to the stump of a small tree, or shrub. Stubs sharp and hideous to behold. --Chaucer. And prickly stubs instead of trees are found. --Dryden. 2. A log; a block; a blockhead. [Obs.] --Milton. 3. The short blunt part of anything after larger part has been broken off or used up; hence, anything short and thick; as, the stub of a pencil, candle, or cigar. 4. A part of a leaf in a check book, after a check is torn out, on which the number, amount, and destination of the check are usually recorded. 5. A pen with a short, blunt nib. 6. A stub nail; an old horseshoe nail; also, stub iron. Stub end (Mach.), the enlarged end of a connecting rod, to which the strap is fastened. Stub iron, iron made from stub nails, or old horseshoe nails, -- used in making gun barrels. Stub mortise (Carp.), a mortise passing only partly through the timber in which it is formed. Stub nail, an old horseshoe nail; a nail broken off; also, a short, thick nail. Stub short, or Stub shot (Lumber Manuf.), the part of the end of a sawn log or plank which is beyond the place where the saw kerf ends, and which retains the plank in connection with the log, until it is split off. Stub twist, material for a gun barrel, made of a spirally welded ribbon of steel and stub iron combined.
Unmortise
Unmortise Un*mor"tise, v. t. [1st pref. un- + mortise.] To loosen, unfix, or separate, as things mortised together. --Tennyson.

Meaning of Mortis from wikipedia

- Rigor mortis (Latin: rigor "stiffness", mortis "of death"), or postmortem rigidity, is the third stage of death. It is one of the recognizable signs of...
- Mortis may refer to: Mortis, a fictional planet in the Star Wars franchise Mortis (food), a sweet chicken pâté of Elizabethan times Chris Kanyon (1970–2010)...
- Pallor mortis (Latin: pallor "paleness", mortis "of death"), the first stage of death, is an after-death paleness that occurs in those with light/white...
- Livor mortis (Latin: livor – "bluish color", mortis – "of death"), postmortem lividity (Latin: postmortem – "after death", lividity – "black and blue")...
- death (no neuronal activity) Pallor mortis, paleness which happens in the 15–120 minutes after death Algor mortis, the reduction in body temperature following...
- Algor mortis (Latin: algor—coldness; mortis—of death), the second stage of death, is the change in body temperature post mortem, until the ambient temperature...
- Putrefaction is the fifth stage of death, following pallor mortis, algor mortis, rigor mortis, and livor mortis. This process references the breaking down of a body...
- James Bond novel Trigger Mortis". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 6 November 2015. Ditum, Sarah (2 September 2015). "Trigger Mortis by Anthony Horowitz review...
- Mak's 'Rigor Mortis' a disorienting Hong Kong horror flick". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 16 September 2014. Rigor Mortis on IMDb Rigor Mortis at Rotten...
- Rigor mortis is one of the recognizable signs of death. It may also refer to: Rigor Mortis (film), a 2013 film by Juno Mak "Rigor Mortis" (song), a song...
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