Definition of Mineralogically. Meaning of Mineralogically. Synonyms of Mineralogically

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Mineralogically. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Mineralogically and, of course, Mineralogically synonyms and on the right images related to the word Mineralogically.

Definition of Mineralogically

Mineralogically
Mineralogically Min`er*al*og"ic*al*ly, adv. According to the principles of, or with reference to, mineralogy.

Meaning of Mineralogically from wikipedia

- Mineralogy is a subject of geology specializing in the scientific study of the chemistry, crystal structure, and physical (including optical) properties...
- In the field of mineralogy, fracture is the texture and shape of a rock's surface formed when a mineral is fractured. Minerals often have a highly distinctive...
- Lustre (British English) or luster (American English; see spelling differences) is the way light interacts with the surface of a crystal, rock, or mineral...
-  18–16. ISBN 0-00-219909-2. Physical Characteristics of Minerals, at Introduction to Mineralogy by Andrea Bangert What is Streak? from the Mineral Gallery...
- Optical mineralogy is the study of minerals and rocks by measuring their optical properties. Most commonly, rock and mineral samples are prepared as thin...
- Normative mineralogy is a calculation of the composition of a rock sample that estimates the idealised mineralogy of a rock based on a quantitative chemical...
- In mineralogy, tenacity is a mineral's behavior when deformed or broken. Brittleness: The mineral breaks or powders easily. Most ionic-bonded minerals...
- Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry is the official review journal of the Mineralogical Society of America and The Geochemical Society. It was established...
- infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and SEM-EDS or automated mineralogy processes. These methods can be augmented by polarized light microscopy...
- Early writing on mineralogy, especially on gemstones, comes from ancient Babylonia, the ancient Greco-Roman world, ancient and medieval China, and Sanskrit...
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