Definition of Marmo. Meaning of Marmo. Synonyms of Marmo

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Definition of Marmo

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A marmotta
Marmot Mar"mot, n. [It. marmotta, marmotto, prob. fr. L. mus montanus, or mus montis, lit., mountain mouse or rat. See Mountain, and Mouse.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any rodent of the genus Arctomys. The common European marmot (A. marmotta) is about the size of a rabbit, and inhabits the higher regions of the Alps and Pyrenees. The bobac is another European species. The common American species (A. monax) is the woodchuck.
Chelopus marmoratus
Ellachick El"la*chick, n. [Native Indian name.] (Zo["o]l.) A fresh-water tortoise (Chelopus marmoratus) of California; -- used as food.
F marmorata
Tiger Ti"ger, n. [OE. tigre, F. tigre, L. tigris, Gr. ti`gris; probably of Persian origin; cf. Zend tighra pointed, tighri an arrow, Per. t[=i]r; perhaps akin to E. stick, v.t.; -- probably so named from its quickness.] 1. A very large and powerful carnivore (Felis tigris) native of Southern Asia and the East Indies. Its back and sides are tawny or rufous yellow, transversely striped with black, the tail is ringed with black, the throat and belly are nearly white. When full grown, it equals or exceeds the lion in size and strength. Called also royal tiger, and Bengal tiger. 2. Fig.: A ferocious, bloodthirsty person. As for heinous tiger, Tamora. --Shak. 3. A servant in livery, who rides with his master or mistress. --Dickens. 4. A kind of growl or screech, after cheering; as, three cheers and a tiger. [Colloq. U. S.] 5. A pneumatic box or pan used in refining sugar. American tiger. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The puma. (b) The jaguar. Clouded tiger (Zo["o]l.), a handsome striped and spotted carnivore (Felis macrocelis or F. marmorata) native of the East Indies and Southern Asia. Its body is about three and a half feet long, and its tail about three feet long. Its ground color is brownish gray, and the dark markings are irregular stripes, spots, and rings, but there are always two dark bands on the face, one extending back from the eye, and one from the angle of the mouth. Called also tortoise-shell tiger. Mexican tiger (Zo["o]l.), the jaguar. Tiger beetle (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of active carnivorous beetles of the family Cicindelid[ae]. They usually inhabit dry or sandy places, and fly rapidly. Tiger bittern. (Zo["o]l.) See Sun bittern, under Sun. Tiger cat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of wild cats of moderate size with dark transverse bars or stripes somewhat resembling those of the tiger. Tiger flower (Bot.), an iridaceous plant of the genus Tigridia (as T. conchiflora, T. grandiflora, etc.) having showy flowers, spotted or streaked somewhat like the skin of a tiger. Tiger grass (Bot.), a low East Indian fan palm (Cham[ae]rops Ritchieana). It is used in many ways by the natives. --J. Smith (Dict. Econ. Plants). Tiger lily. (Bot.) See under Lily. Tiger moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of moths of the family Arctiad[ae] which are striped or barred with black and white or with other conspicuous colors. The larv[ae] are called woolly bears. Tiger shark (Zo["o]l.), a voracious shark (Galeocerdo maculatus or tigrinus) more or less barred or spotted with yellow. It is found in both the Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Called also zebra shark. Tiger shell (Zo["o]l.), a large and conspicuously spotted cowrie (Cypr[ae]a tigris); -- so called from its fancied resemblance to a tiger in color and markings. Called also tiger cowrie. Tiger wolf (Zo["o]l.), the spotted hyena (Hy[ae]na crocuta). Tiger wood, the variegated heartwood of a tree (Mach[ae]rium Schomburgkii) found in Guiana.
Felis marmorata
Rimau dahan Ri"mau da"han [From the native Oriental name.] (Zo["o]l.) The clouded tiger cat (Felis marmorata) of Southern Asia and the East Indies.
leopard marmot
Gopher Go"pher, n. [F. gaufre waffle, honeycomb. See Gauffer.] (Zo["o]l.) 1. One of several North American burrowing rodents of the genera Geomys and Thomomys, of the family Geomyid[ae]; -- called also pocket gopher and pouched rat. See Pocket gopher, and Tucan. Note: The name was originally given by French settlers to many burrowing rodents, from their honeycombing the earth. 2. One of several western American species of the genus Spermophilus, of the family Sciurid[ae]; as, the gray gopher (Spermophilus Franklini) and the striped gopher (S. tridecemlineatus); -- called also striped prairie squirrel, leopard marmot, and leopard spermophile. See Spermophile. 3. A large land tortoise (Testudo Carilina) of the Southern United States, which makes extensive burrows. 4. A large burrowing snake (Spilotes Couperi) of the Southern United States. Gopher drift (Mining), an irregular prospecting drift, following or seeking the ore without regard to regular grade or section. --Raymond.
Marmolite
Marmolite Mar"mo*lite, n. [Gr. ? to sparcle + -lite.] (Min.) A thin, laminated variety of serpentine, usually of a pale green color.
Marmoraceous
Marmoraceous Mar`mo*ra"ceous, a. [L. marmor marble. See Marble.] Pertaining to, or like, marble.
Marmorate
Marmorate Mar"mo*rate, Marmorated Mar"mo*ra`ted, a. [L. marmoratus, p. p. of marmorate to overlay with marble, fr. marmor marble.] Variegated like marble; covered or overlaid with marble. [R.]
Marmorated
Marmorate Mar"mo*rate, Marmorated Mar"mo*ra`ted, a. [L. marmoratus, p. p. of marmorate to overlay with marble, fr. marmor marble.] Variegated like marble; covered or overlaid with marble. [R.]
Marmoration
Marmoration Mar`mo*ra"tion, n. [L. marmoratio.] A covering or incrusting with marble; a casing of marble; a variegating so as to resemble marble. [R.]
Marmoratum opus
Marmoratum opus Mar`mo*ra`tum o"pus [L. See Marmorate, and Opus.] (Arch.) A kind of hard finish for plasterwork, made of plaster of Paris and marble dust, and capable of taking a high polish.
Marmorosis
Marmorosis Mar`mo*ro"sis, n. [NL.] (Geol.) The metamorphism of limestone, that is, its conversion into marble. --Geikie.
Marmose
Marmose Mar"mose`, n. [F.] (Zo["o]l.) A species of small opossum (Didelphus murina) ranging from Mexico to Brazil.
Marmoset
Marmoset Mar"mo*set`, n. [F. marmouset a grotesque figure, an ugly little boy, prob. fr. LL. marmoretum, fr. L. marmor marble. Perhaps confused with marmot. See Marble.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of small South American monkeys of the genera Hapale and Midas, family Hapalid[ae]. They have long soft fur, and a hairy, nonprehensile tail. They are often kept as pets. Called also squirrel monkey.
Marmot
Marmot Mar"mot, n. [It. marmotta, marmotto, prob. fr. L. mus montanus, or mus montis, lit., mountain mouse or rat. See Mountain, and Mouse.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any rodent of the genus Arctomys. The common European marmot (A. marmotta) is about the size of a rabbit, and inhabits the higher regions of the Alps and Pyrenees. The bobac is another European species. The common American species (A. monax) is the woodchuck.
Marmot squirrel
2. Any one of several species of ground squirrels or gophers of the genus Spermophilus; also, the prairie dog. Marmot squirrel (Zo["o]l.), a ground squirrel or spermophile. Prairie marmot. See Prairie dog.
Marmottes oil
Marmottes oil Mar"mottes oil` A fine oil obtained from the kernel of Prunus brigantiaca. It is used instead of olive or almond oil. --De Colange.
Marmozet
Marmozet Mar"mo*zet`, n. See Marmoset.
Prairie marmot
Prairie Prai"rie, n. [F., an extensive meadow, OF. praerie, LL. prataria, fr. L. pratum a meadow.] 1. An extensive tract of level or rolling land, destitute of trees, covered with coarse grass, and usually characterized by a deep, fertile soil. They abound throughout the Mississippi valley, between the Alleghanies and the Rocky mountains. From the forests and the prairies, From the great lakes of the northland. --Longfellow. 2. A meadow or tract of grass; especially, a so called natural meadow. Prairie chicken (Zo["o]l.), any American grouse of the genus Tympanuchus, especially T. Americanus (formerly T. cupido), which inhabits the prairies of the central United States. Applied also to the sharp-tailed grouse. Prairie clover (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Petalostemon, having small rosy or white flowers in dense terminal heads or spikes. Several species occur in the prairies of the United States. Prairie dock (Bot.), a coarse composite plant (Silphium terebinthaceum) with large rough leaves and yellow flowers, found in the Western prairies. Prairie dog (Zo["o]l.), a small American rodent (Cynomys Ludovicianus) allied to the marmots. It inhabits the plains west of the Mississippi. The prairie dogs burrow in the ground in large warrens, and have a sharp bark like that of a dog. Called also prairie marmot. Prairie grouse. Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie hare (Zo["o]l.), a large long-eared Western hare (Lepus campestris). See Jack rabbit, under 2d Jack. Prairie hawk, Prairie falcon (Zo["o]l.), a falcon of Western North America (Falco Mexicanus). The upper parts are brown. The tail has transverse bands of white; the under parts, longitudinal streaks and spots of brown. Prairie hen. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie itch (Med.), an affection of the skin attended with intense itching, which is observed in the Northern and Western United States; -- also called swamp itch, winter itch. Prairie marmot. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie dog, above. Prairie mole (Zo["o]l.), a large American mole (Scalops argentatus), native of the Western prairies. Prairie pigeon, plover, or snipe (Zo["o]l.), the upland plover. See Plover, n., 2. Prairie rattlesnake (Zo["o]l.), the massasauga. Prairie snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless American snake (Masticophis flavigularis). It is pale yellow, tinged with brown above. Prairie squirrel (Zo["o]l.), any American ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus, inhabiting prairies; -- called also gopher. Prairie turnip (Bot.), the edible turnip-shaped farinaceous root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta) of the Upper Missouri region; also, the plant itself. Called also pomme blanche, and pomme de prairie. Prairie warbler (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored American warbler (Dendroica discolor). The back is olive yellow, with a group of reddish spots in the middle; the under parts and the parts around the eyes are bright yellow; the sides of the throat and spots along the sides, black; three outer tail feathers partly white. Prairie wolf. (Zo["o]l.) See Coyote.
prairie marmot
Prairie Prai"rie, n. [F., an extensive meadow, OF. praerie, LL. prataria, fr. L. pratum a meadow.] 1. An extensive tract of level or rolling land, destitute of trees, covered with coarse grass, and usually characterized by a deep, fertile soil. They abound throughout the Mississippi valley, between the Alleghanies and the Rocky mountains. From the forests and the prairies, From the great lakes of the northland. --Longfellow. 2. A meadow or tract of grass; especially, a so called natural meadow. Prairie chicken (Zo["o]l.), any American grouse of the genus Tympanuchus, especially T. Americanus (formerly T. cupido), which inhabits the prairies of the central United States. Applied also to the sharp-tailed grouse. Prairie clover (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Petalostemon, having small rosy or white flowers in dense terminal heads or spikes. Several species occur in the prairies of the United States. Prairie dock (Bot.), a coarse composite plant (Silphium terebinthaceum) with large rough leaves and yellow flowers, found in the Western prairies. Prairie dog (Zo["o]l.), a small American rodent (Cynomys Ludovicianus) allied to the marmots. It inhabits the plains west of the Mississippi. The prairie dogs burrow in the ground in large warrens, and have a sharp bark like that of a dog. Called also prairie marmot. Prairie grouse. Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie hare (Zo["o]l.), a large long-eared Western hare (Lepus campestris). See Jack rabbit, under 2d Jack. Prairie hawk, Prairie falcon (Zo["o]l.), a falcon of Western North America (Falco Mexicanus). The upper parts are brown. The tail has transverse bands of white; the under parts, longitudinal streaks and spots of brown. Prairie hen. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie itch (Med.), an affection of the skin attended with intense itching, which is observed in the Northern and Western United States; -- also called swamp itch, winter itch. Prairie marmot. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie dog, above. Prairie mole (Zo["o]l.), a large American mole (Scalops argentatus), native of the Western prairies. Prairie pigeon, plover, or snipe (Zo["o]l.), the upland plover. See Plover, n., 2. Prairie rattlesnake (Zo["o]l.), the massasauga. Prairie snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless American snake (Masticophis flavigularis). It is pale yellow, tinged with brown above. Prairie squirrel (Zo["o]l.), any American ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus, inhabiting prairies; -- called also gopher. Prairie turnip (Bot.), the edible turnip-shaped farinaceous root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta) of the Upper Missouri region; also, the plant itself. Called also pomme blanche, and pomme de prairie. Prairie warbler (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored American warbler (Dendroica discolor). The back is olive yellow, with a group of reddish spots in the middle; the under parts and the parts around the eyes are bright yellow; the sides of the throat and spots along the sides, black; three outer tail feathers partly white. Prairie wolf. (Zo["o]l.) See Coyote.
Prairie marmot
2. Any one of several species of ground squirrels or gophers of the genus Spermophilus; also, the prairie dog. Marmot squirrel (Zo["o]l.), a ground squirrel or spermophile. Prairie marmot. See Prairie dog.
Scorpaenichthys marmoratus
Sculpin Scul"pin, n. [Written also skulpin.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of marine cottoid fishes of the genus Cottus, or Acanthocottus, having a large head armed with sharp spines, and a broad mouth. They are generally mottled with yellow, brown, and black. Several species are found on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and America. (b) A large cottoid market fish of California (Scorp[ae]nichthys marmoratus); -- called also bighead, cabezon, scorpion, salpa. (c) The dragonet, or yellow sculpin, of Europe (Callionymus lura). Note: The name is also applied to other related California species. Deep-water sculpin, the sea raven.

Meaning of Marmo from wikipedia

- concentrated on plain tiles used as facing, notably an artificial marble called Marmo, as used on Atlas House, King Street, Leeds and Michelin House, London,...
- Philip Sang'ka Marmo (29 December 1951) is a Tanzanian politician and diplomat. "Member of Parliament CV". Parliament of Tanzania. Retrieved 12 August...
- Colle Marmo (Bisentino: Colli Màrme) is a frazione of Bisenti in the Province of Teramo in the Abruzzo region of Italy. Coordinates: 42°32′50″N 13°48′07″E...
- Malia Scotch Marmo (born May 4, 1955) is an American screenwriter and teacher, best known for writing L****e Hallstrom's Once Around and Steven Spielberg's...
- Alejandro Marmo is an Argentine artist born in the district of Tres de Febrero, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. He is the author of the "Art in the...
- directed by Steven Spielberg and written by James V. Hart and Malia Scotch Marmo. It stars Robin Williams as Peter Banning / Peter Pan, Dustin Hoffman as...
- Aiello, Laura San Giacomo and Gena Rowlands and was written by Malia Scotch Marmo and directed by L****e Hallström. The Bellas are a close-knit family of Italian-Americans...
- California. The film was written by Marshall, Bob Brunner, and Malia Scotch Marmo (uncredited). After receiving a well-earned certification from a sheltered...
- probable author as Neapolitan professor Marcella Marmo, who studied in Pisa from 1964 to 1966. Both Marmo and the publisher deny Santagata's identification...
- Robert Downey Jr., and Bonnie Hunt. Written by Diane Drake and Malia Scotch Marmo (uncredited), the film is about a young woman whose search for the man she...
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