Definition of Malle. Meaning of Malle. Synonyms of Malle

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Definition of Malle

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Immalleable
Immalleable Im*mal"le*a*ble, a. Not maleable.
Malleable iron
Iron I"ron ([imac]"[u^]rn), n. [OE. iren, AS. [=i]ren, [=i]sen, [=i]sern; akin to D. ijzer, OS. [=i]sarn, OHG. [=i]sarn, [=i]san, G. eisen, Icel. [=i]sarn, j[=a]rn, Sw. & Dan. jern, and perh. to E. ice; cf. Ir. iarann, W. haiarn, Armor. houarn.] 1. (Chem.) The most common and most useful metallic element, being of almost universal occurrence, usually in the form of an oxide (as hematite, magnetite, etc.), or a hydrous oxide (as limonite, turgite, etc.). It is reduced on an enormous scale in three principal forms; viz., cast iron, steel, and wrought iron. Iron usually appears dark brown, from oxidation or impurity, but when pure, or on a fresh surface, is a gray or white metal. It is easily oxidized (rusted) by moisture, and is attacked by many corrosive agents. Symbol Fe (Latin Ferrum). Atomic weight 55.9. Specific gravity, pure iron, 7.86; cast iron, 7.1. In magnetic properties, it is superior to all other substances. Note: The value of iron is largely due to the facility with which it can be worked. Thus, when heated it is malleable and ductile, and can be easily welded and forged at a high temperature. As cast iron, it is easily fusible; as steel, is very tough, and (when tempered) very hard and elastic. Chemically, iron is grouped with cobalt and nickel. Steel is a variety of iron containing more carbon than wrought iron, but less that cast iron. It is made either from wrought iron, by roasting in a packing of carbon (cementation) or from cast iron, by burning off the impurities in a Bessemer converter (then called Bessemer steel), or directly from the iron ore (as in the Siemens rotatory and generating furnace). 2. An instrument or utensil made of iron; -- chiefly in composition; as, a flatiron, a smoothing iron, etc. My young soldier, put up your iron. --Shak. 3. pl. Fetters; chains; handcuffs; manacles. Four of the sufferers were left to rot in irons. --Macaulay. 4. Strength; power; firmness; inflexibility; as, to rule with a rod of iron. Bar iron. See Wrought iron (below). Bog iron, bog ore; limonite. See Bog ore, under Bog. Cast iron (Metal.), an impure variety of iron, containing from three to six percent of carbon, part of which is united with a part of the iron, as a carbide, and the rest is uncombined, as graphite. It there is little free carbon, the product is white iron; if much of the carbon has separated as graphite, it is called gray iron. See also Cast iron, in the Vocabulary. Fire irons. See under Fire, n. Gray irons. See under Fire, n. Gray iron. See Cast iron (above). It irons (Naut.), said of a sailing vessel, when, in tacking, she comes up head to the wind and will not fill away on either tack. Magnetic iron. See Magnetite. Malleable iron (Metal.), iron sufficiently pure or soft to be capable of extension under the hammer; also, specif., a kind of iron produced by removing a portion of the carbon or other impurities from cast iron, rendering it less brittle, and to some extent malleable. Meteoric iron (Chem.), iron forming a large, and often the chief, ingredient of meteorites. It invariably contains a small amount of nickel and cobalt. Cf. Meteorite. Pig iron, the form in which cast iron is made at the blast furnace, being run into molds, called pigs. Reduced iron. See under Reduced. Specular iron. See Hematite. Too many irons in the fire, too many objects requiring the attention at once. White iron. See Cast iron (above). Wrought iron (Metal.), the purest form of iron commonly known in the arts, containing only about half of one per cent of carbon. It is made either directly from the ore, as in the Catalan forge or bloomery, or by purifying (puddling) cast iron in a reverberatory furnace or refinery. It is tough, malleable, and ductile. When formed into bars, it is called bar iron.
Malleableize
Malleableize Mal"le*a*ble*ize, v. t. To make malleable.
Malleableness
Malleableness Mal"le*a*ble*ness, n. Quality of being malleable.
Malleal
Malleal Mal"le*al, a. (Anat.) Pertaining to the malleus.
Malleate
Malleate Mal"le*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Malleated; p. pr. & vb. n. Malleating.] [L. malleatus hammered, fr. malleus a hammer. See Mall, v. t.] To hammer; to beat into a plate or leaf.
Malleated
Malleate Mal"le*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Malleated; p. pr. & vb. n. Malleating.] [L. malleatus hammered, fr. malleus a hammer. See Mall, v. t.] To hammer; to beat into a plate or leaf.
Malleating
Malleate Mal"le*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Malleated; p. pr. & vb. n. Malleating.] [L. malleatus hammered, fr. malleus a hammer. See Mall, v. t.] To hammer; to beat into a plate or leaf.
Mallecho
Mallecho Mal"le*cho, n. Same as Malicho.
Malled
Mall Mall (m[add]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Malled (m[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Malling.] [Cf. OF. mailler. See Mall beetle, and cf. Malleate.] To beat with a mall; to beat with something heavy; to bruise; to maul.
Mallee
Mallee Mal"lee, n. [Native name.] 1. (Bot.) A dwarf Australian eucalypt with a number of thin stems springing from a thickened stock. The most common species are Eucalyptus dumosa and E. Gracilis. 2. Scrub or thicket formed by the mallee. [Australia]
Mallee bird
Mallee bird Mal*lee" bird` (Zo["o]l.) [From native name.] The leipoa. See Leipoa.
Mallei
Malleus Mal"le*us, n.; pl. Mallei. [L., hammer. See Mall a beetle.] 1. (Anat.) The outermost of the three small auditory bones, ossicles; the hammer. It is attached to the tympanic membrane by a long process, the handle or manubrium. See Illust. of Far. 2. (Zo["o]l.) One of the hard lateral pieces of the mastax of Rotifera. See Mastax. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A genus of bivalve shells; the hammer shell.
Mallemock
Mallemock Mal"le*mock, Mallemoke Mal"le*moke, n. (Zo["o]l.) See Mollemoke.
mallemocke
Mollemoke Mol"le*moke`, n. [Sw. mallemucke the stormy petrel.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of large pelagic petrels and fulmars, as Fulmarus glacialis, of the North Atlantic, and several species of [AE]strelata, of the Southern Ocean. See Fulmar. [Written also mollymawk, malmock, mollemock, mallemocke, etc.]
Mallemoke
Mallemock Mal"le*mock, Mallemoke Mal"le*moke, n. (Zo["o]l.) See Mollemoke.
mallenders
Malanders Mal"an*ders, n. pl. [F. malandres, fr. L. malandria blisters or pustules on the neck, especially in horses.] (Far.) A scurfy eruption in the bend of the knee of the fore leg of a horse. See Sallenders. [Written also mallenders.]
Mallenders
Mallenders Mal"len*ders, n. pl. (Far.) Same as Malanders.
Malleolar
Malleolar Mal*le"o*lar, a. [See Malleolus.] (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the malleolus; in the region of the malleoli of the ankle joint.
Malleoli
Malleolus Mal*le"*o*lus, n.; pl. Malleoli. [L., dim. of malleus hammer.] 1. (Anat.) A projection at the distal end of each bone of the leg at the ankle joint. The malleolus of the tibia is the internal projection, that of the fibula the external. 2. `` A layer, ' a shoot partly buried in the ground, and there cut halfway through.
Malleolus
Malleolus Mal*le"*o*lus, n.; pl. Malleoli. [L., dim. of malleus hammer.] 1. (Anat.) A projection at the distal end of each bone of the leg at the ankle joint. The malleolus of the tibia is the internal projection, that of the fibula the external. 2. `` A layer, ' a shoot partly buried in the ground, and there cut halfway through.
Mallet
Mallet Mal"let, n. [F. maillet, dim. of mail. See Mall a beetle.] A small maul with a short handle, -- used esp. for driving a tool, as a chisel or the like; also, a light beetle with a long handle, -- used in playing croquet.
Malleus
Malleus Mal"le*us, n.; pl. Mallei. [L., hammer. See Mall a beetle.] 1. (Anat.) The outermost of the three small auditory bones, ossicles; the hammer. It is attached to the tympanic membrane by a long process, the handle or manubrium. See Illust. of Far. 2. (Zo["o]l.) One of the hard lateral pieces of the mastax of Rotifera. See Mastax. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A genus of bivalve shells; the hammer shell.
Serving mallet
Serving Serv"ing, a. & n. from Serve. Serving board (Naut.), a flat piece of wood used in serving ropes. Serving maid, a female servant; a maidservant. Serving mallet (Naut.), a wooden instrument shaped like a mallet, used in serving ropes. Serving man, a male servant, or attendant; a manservant. Serving stuff (Naut.), small lines for serving ropes.
Smaller
Small Small (sm[add]l), a. [Compar. Smaller; superl. Smallest.] [OE. small, AS. sm[ae]l; akin to D. smal narrow, OS. & OHG. smal small, G. schmal narrow, Dan. & Sw. smal, Goth. smals small, Icel. smali smal cattle, sheep, or goats; cf. Gr. mh^lon a sheep or goat.] 1. Having little size, compared with other things of the same kind; little in quantity or degree; diminutive; not large or extended in dimension; not great; not much; inconsiderable; as, a small man; a small river. To compare Great things with small. --Milton. 2. Being of slight consequence; feeble in influence or importance; unimportant; trivial; insignificant; as, a small fault; a small business. 3. Envincing little worth or ability; not large-minded; -- sometimes, in reproach, paltry; mean. A true delineation of the smallest man is capable of interesting the greatest man. --Carlyle.
smaller Ionic
Ionic I*on"ic, n. 1. (Pros.) (a) A foot consisting of four syllables: either two long and two short, -- that is, a spondee and a pyrrhic, in which case it is called the greater Ionic; or two short and two long, -- that is, a pyrrhic and a spondee, in which case it is called the smaller Ionic. (b) A verse or meter composed or consisting of Ionic feet. 2. The Ionic dialect; as, the Homeric Ionic. 3. (Print.) Ionic type.
Smallest
Small Small (sm[add]l), a. [Compar. Smaller; superl. Smallest.] [OE. small, AS. sm[ae]l; akin to D. smal narrow, OS. & OHG. smal small, G. schmal narrow, Dan. & Sw. smal, Goth. smals small, Icel. smali smal cattle, sheep, or goats; cf. Gr. mh^lon a sheep or goat.] 1. Having little size, compared with other things of the same kind; little in quantity or degree; diminutive; not large or extended in dimension; not great; not much; inconsiderable; as, a small man; a small river. To compare Great things with small. --Milton. 2. Being of slight consequence; feeble in influence or importance; unimportant; trivial; insignificant; as, a small fault; a small business. 3. Envincing little worth or ability; not large-minded; -- sometimes, in reproach, paltry; mean. A true delineation of the smallest man is capable of interesting the greatest man. --Carlyle.

Meaning of Malle from wikipedia

- Louis Marie Malle (French: [mal]; 30 October 1932 – 23 November 1995) was a French film director, screenwriter and producer. His film Le Monde du silence...
- Malle (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈmɑlə]) is a muni****lity located in the Campine region of the Belgian province of Antwerp. The muni****lity comprises the...
- Parfums Frédéric Malle in 2000. Frédéric Malle was born in Paris and is the son of Marie Christine Hetfler-Louiche and Jean-François Malle. Marie was the...
- Malle Babbe is a painting by the Dutch Golden Age painter Frans Hals, painted between 1633 and 1635 and now in the Gemäldegalerie, Berlin. The painting...
- Aly Mallé (born 3 April 1998) is a Malian footballer who currently plays as a left winger for Turkish club Balıkesirspor on loan from Udinese. Born in...
- Farewell My Concubine for U.S. theatrical release; 1993 Cannes jury head Louis Malle was furious. "The film we admired so much in Cannes is not the film seen...
- Malle Leis (7 July 1940 – 9 August 2017) was an Estonian painter and graphic artist. Leis was born in Viljandi and was educated at the Tartu Art School...
- French film by French director Louis Malle and starring Lea M****ari, Benoît Ferreux and Daniel Gélin. Written as Malle's semi-autobiography, the film tells...
- prominence as the star of Elevator to the Gallows (1958), directed by Louis Malle, and Jules et Jim (1962), directed by François Truffaut. Most prolific during...
- Lift to the Scaffold (UK), is a 1958 French crime film directed by Louis Malle, starring Jeanne Moreau and Maurice Ronet as illicit lovers whose murder...
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