Definition of Ising. Meaning of Ising. Synonyms of Ising

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Definition of Ising

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Advertising
Advertise Ad`ver*tise" (?; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Advertised; p. pr. & vb. n. Advertising.] [F. avertir, formerly also spelt advertir, to warn, give notice to, L. advertere to turn to. The ending was probably influenced by the noun advertisement. See Advert.] To give notice to; to inform or apprise; to notify; to make known; hence, to warn; -- often followed by of before the subject of information; as, to advertise a man of his loss. [Archaic] I will advertise thee what this people shall do. --Num. xxiv. 14. 4. To give public notice of; to announce publicly, esp. by a printed notice; as, to advertise goods for sale, a lost article, the sailing day of a vessel, a political meeting. Syn: To apprise; inform; make known; notify; announce; proclaim; promulgate; publish.
Appraising
Appraise Ap*praise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Appraised; p. pr. & vb. n. Appraising.] [Pref. ad- + praise. See Praise, Price, Apprize, Appreciate.] 1. To set a value; to estimate the worth of, particularly by persons appointed for the purpose; as, to appraise goods and chattels. 2. To estimate; to conjecture. Enoch . . . appraised his weight. --Tennyson. 3. To praise; to commend. [Obs.] --R. Browning. Appraised the Lycian custom. --Tennyson. Note: In the United States, this word is often pronounced, and sometimes written, apprize.
Apprising
Apprise Ap*prise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Apprised; p. pr. & vb. n. Apprising.] [F. appris, fem. apprise, p. p. apprendre to learn, to teach, to inform. Cf. Apprehend, Apprentice.] To give notice, verbal or written; to inform; -- followed by of; as, we will apprise the general of an intended attack; he apprised the commander of what he had done.
Chastising
Chastise Chas*tise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Chastised; p. pr. & vb. n. Chastising.] [OE. chastisen; chastien + ending -isen + modern -ise, ize, L. izare, G. ?. See Chasten.] 1. To inflict pain upon, by means of stripes, or in any other manner, for the purpose of punishment or reformation; to punish, as with stripes. How fine my master is! I am afraid He will chastise me. --Shak. I am glad to see the vanity or envy of the canting chemists thus discovered and chastised. --Boyle. 2. To reduce to order or obedience; to correct or purify; to free from faults or excesses. The gay, social sense, by decency chastised. --Thomson. Syn: See Chasten.
Circumcising
Circumcise Cir"cum*cise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Circumcised; p. pr. & vb. n. Circumcising.] [L. circumcisus, p. p. of circumcidere to cut around, to circumcise; circum + caedere to cut; akin to E. c[ae]sura, homicide, concise, and prob. to shed, v. t.] 1. To cut off the prepuce of foreskin of, in the case of males, and the internal labia of, in the case of females. 2. (Script.) To purify spiritually.
Comprising
Comprise Com*prise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Comprised; p. pr. & vb. n. Comprising.] [From F. compris, comprise, p. p. of comprendre, L. comprehendere. See Comprehend.] To comprehend; to include. Comprise much matter in few words. --Hocker. Friendship does two souls in one comprise. --Roscommon. Syn: To embrace; include; comprehend; contain; encircle; inclose; involve; imply.
Counterpoising
Counterpoise Coun"ter*poise` (koun"t?r-poiz`; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Counterpoised (-poizd`); p. pr. & vb. n. Counterpoising.] [OE. countrepesen, counterpeisen, F. contrepeser. See Counter, adv., and Poise, v. t. ] 1. To act against with equal weight; to equal in weight; to balance the weight of; to counterbalance. Weights, counterpoising one another. --Sir K. Digby. 2. To act against with equal power; to balance. So many freeholders of English will be able to beard and counterpoise the rest. --Spenser.
Demising
Demise De*mise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Demised; p. pr. & vb. n. Demising.] 1. To transfer or transmit by succession or inheritance; to grant or bestow by will; to bequeath. ``Power to demise my lands.' --Swift. What honor Canst thou demise to any child of mine? --Shak. 2. To convey; to give. [R.] His soul is at his conception demised to him. --Hammond. 3. (Law) To convey, as an estate, by lease; to lease.
Despising
Despise De*spise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Despised; p. pr. & vb. n. Despising.] [OF. despis-, in some forms of despire to despise, fr. L. despicere, despectum, to look down upon, despise; de- + spicere, specere, to look. See Spy, and cf. Despicable, Despite.] To look down upon with disfavor or contempt; to contemn; to scorn; to disdain; to have a low opinion or contemptuous dislike of. Fools despise wisdom and instruction. --Prov. i. 7. Men naturally despise those who court them, but respect those who do not give way to them. --Jowett (Thucyd. ). Syn: To contemn; scorn; disdain; slight; undervalue. See Contemn.
Despisingly
Despisingly De*spis"ing*ly, adv. Contemptuously.
Devising
Devise De*vise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Devised; p. pr. & vb. n. Devising.] [OF. deviser to distribute, regulate, direct, relate, F., to chat, fr. L. divisus divided, distributed, p. p. of dividere. See Divide, and cf. Device.] 1. To form in the mind by new combinations of ideas, new applications of principles, or new arrangement of parts; to formulate by thought; to contrive; to excogitate; to invent; to plan; to scheme; as, to devise an engine, a new mode of writing, a plan of defense, or an argument. To devise curious works. --Ex. CCTV. 32. Devising schemes to realize his ambitious views. --Bancroft. 2. To plan or scheme for; to purpose to obtain. For wisdom is most riches; fools therefore They are which fortunes do by vows devise. --Spenser. 3. To say; to relate; to describe. [Obs.] --Chaucer. 4. To imagine; to guess. [Obs.] --Spenser. 5. (Law) To give by will; -- used of real estate; formerly, also, of chattels. Syn: To bequeath; invent; discover; contrive; excogitate; imagine; plan; scheme. See Bequeath.
Disfranchising
Disfranchise Dis*fran"chise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Disfranchised; p. pr. & vb. n. Disfranchising.] [Cf. Diffranchise.] To deprive of a franchise or chartered right; to dispossess of the rights of a citizen, or of a particular privilege, as of voting, holding office, etc. Sir William Fitzwilliam was disfranchised. --Fabyan (1509). He was partially disfranchised so as to be made incapable of taking part in public affairs. --Thirlwall.
Disguising
Disguising Dis*guis"ing, n. A masque or masquerade. [Obs.]
Disingenuity
Disingenuity Dis*in`ge*nu"i*ty, n. Disingenuousness. [Obs.] --Clarendon.
Disingenuous
Disingenuous Dis`in*gen"u*ous, a. 1. Not noble; unbecoming true honor or dignity; mean; unworthy; as, disingenuous conduct or schemes. 2. Not ingenuous; wanting in noble candor or frankness; not frank or open; uncandid; unworthily or meanly artful. So disingenuous as not to confess them [faults]. --Pope. -- Dis`in*gen"u*ous*ly, adv. --T. Warton. -- Dis`in*gen"u*ous*ness, n. --Macaulay.
Disingenuously
Disingenuous Dis`in*gen"u*ous, a. 1. Not noble; unbecoming true honor or dignity; mean; unworthy; as, disingenuous conduct or schemes. 2. Not ingenuous; wanting in noble candor or frankness; not frank or open; uncandid; unworthily or meanly artful. So disingenuous as not to confess them [faults]. --Pope. -- Dis`in*gen"u*ous*ly, adv. --T. Warton. -- Dis`in*gen"u*ous*ness, n. --Macaulay.
Disingenuousness
Disingenuous Dis`in*gen"u*ous, a. 1. Not noble; unbecoming true honor or dignity; mean; unworthy; as, disingenuous conduct or schemes. 2. Not ingenuous; wanting in noble candor or frankness; not frank or open; uncandid; unworthily or meanly artful. So disingenuous as not to confess them [faults]. --Pope. -- Dis`in*gen"u*ous*ly, adv. --T. Warton. -- Dis`in*gen"u*ous*ness, n. --Macaulay.
Dispraisingly
Dispraisingly Dis*praising*ly, adv. By way of dispraise.
Emprising
Emprising Em*pris"ing, a. [From Emprise, v. t.] Full of daring; adventurous. [Archaic] --T. Campbell.
Enfranchising
Enfranchise En*fran"chise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Enfranchised; p. pr. & vb. n. Enfranchising.] [Pref. en- + franchise: cf. F. enfranchir.] 1. To set free; to liberate from slavery, prison, or any binding power. --Bacon. 2. To endow with a franchise; to incorporate into a body politic and thus to invest with civil and political privileges; to admit to the privileges of a freeman. 3. To receive as denizens; to naturalize; as, to enfranchise foreign words. --I. Watts.
Enterprising
Enterprising En"ter*pri`sing, a. Having a disposition for enterprise; characterized by enterprise; resolute, active or prompt to attempt; as, an enterprising man or firm. -- En"ter*pri`sing*ly, adv.
Enterprisingly
Enterprising En"ter*pri`sing, a. Having a disposition for enterprise; characterized by enterprise; resolute, active or prompt to attempt; as, an enterprising man or firm. -- En"ter*pri`sing*ly, adv.
Excising
Excise Ex*cise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Excised; p. pr. & vb. n. Excising.] 1. To lay or impose an excise upon. 2. To impose upon; to overcharge. [Prov. Eng.]
Franchising
Franchise Fran"chise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Franchised; p. pr. & vb. n. Franchising.] [Cf. OF. franchir to free, F., to cross.] To make free; to enfranchise; to give liberty to. --Shak.
Hisingerite
Hisingerite His"ing*er*ite, n. [Named after W. Hisinger, a Swedish mineralogist.] (Min.) A soft black, iron ore, nearly earthy, a hydrous silicate of iron.
Improvising
Improvise Im`pro*vise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Improvised; p. pr. & vb. n. Improvising.] [F. improviser, it. improvvisare, fr. improvviso unprovided, sudden, extempore, L. improvisus; pref. im- not + provisus foreseen, provided. See Proviso.] 1. To compose, recite, or sing extemporaneously, especially in verse; to extemporize; also, to play upon an instrument, or to act, extemporaneously. 2. To bring about, arrange, or make, on a sudden, or without previous preparation. Charles attempted to improvise a peace. --Motley. 3. To invent, or provide, offhand, or on the spur of the moment; as, he improvised a hammer out of a stone.
Incising
Incise In*cise", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Incised; p. pr. & vb. n. Incising.] [L. incisus, p. p. of incidere to incise: cf. F. inciser. See Incide.] 1. To cut in or into with a sharp instrument; to carve; to engrave. I on thy grave this epitaph incise. --T. Carew. 2. To cut, gash, or wound with a sharp instrument; to cut off.
Isinglass
Isinglass I"sin*glass, n. [Prob. corrupted fr. D. huizenblas (akin to G. hausenblase), lit., bladder of the huso, or large sturgeon; huizen sturgeon + blas bladder. Cf. Bladder, Blast a gust of wind.] 1. A semitransparent, whitish, and very pure from of gelatin, chiefly prepared from the sounds or air bladders of various species of sturgeons (as the Acipenser huso) found in the of Western Russia. It used for making jellies, as a clarifier, etc. Cheaper forms of gelatin are not unfrequently so called. Called also fish glue. 2. (Min.) A popular name for mica, especially when in thin sheets.
isinglass
Mica Mi"ca, n. [L. mica crumb, grain, particle; cf. F. mica.] (Min.) The name of a group of minerals characterized by highly perfect cleavage, so that they readily separate into very thin leaves, more or less elastic. They differ widely in composition, and vary in color from pale brown or yellow to green or black. The transparent forms are used in lanterns, the doors of stoves, etc., being popularly called isinglass. Formerly called also cat-silver, and glimmer. Note: The important species of the mica group are: muscovite, common or potash mica, pale brown or green, often silvery, including damourite (also called hydromica); biotite, iron-magnesia mica, dark brown, green, or black; lepidomelane, iron, mica, black; phlogopite, magnesia mica, colorless, yellow, brown; lepidolite, lithia mica, rose-red, lilac. Mica (usually muscovite, also biotite) is an essential constituent of granite, gneiss, and mica slate; biotite is common in many eruptive rocks; phlogopite in crystalline limestone and serpentine. Mica diorite (Min.), an eruptive rock allied to diorite but containing mica (biotite) instead of hornblende. Mica powder, a kind of dynamite containing fine scales of mica. Mica schist, Mica slate (Geol.), a schistose rock, consisting of mica and quartz with, usually, some feldspar.
Mainprising
Mainprise Main"prise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mainprised; p. pr. & vb. n. Mainprising.] (Law) To suffer to go at large, on his finding sureties, or mainpernors, for his appearance at a day; -- said of a prisoner.

Meaning of Ising from wikipedia

- The Ising model (/ˈaɪsɪŋ/; German: [ˈiːzɪŋ]), named after the physicist Ernst Ising, is a mathematical model of ferromagnetism in statistical mechanics...
- Harman and Ising were an American animation team known for founding the Warner Bros. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer animation studios. Harman and Ising first worked...
- Ising is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Ernst Ising (1900–1998), German physicist Gustav Ising, Swedish accelerator physicist Rudolf...
- Rudolf Carl Ising was an American animator known for creating the Warner Bros. Cartoons and MGM Cartoons and his collaboration with Hugh Harman during...
- animated cartoon character created by animators Hugh Harman and Rudolf Ising. Bosko was the first recurring character in Leon Schlesinger's cartoon series...
- Ising model. He was a professor of physics at Bradley University until his retirement in 1976. Ernst Ising was born in Cologne in 1900. Ernst Ising's...
- Schlesinger hired Rudolf Ising and Hugh Harman to produce the first series of cartoons. Schlesinger was impressed by Harman's and Ising's 1929 pilot cartoon...
- design was inspired by the theoretical Ising model are called Ising machines. Yoshihisa Yamamoto pioneered building Ising machines using photons. Initially...
- distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and produced by Hugh Harman and Rudolf Ising between 1934 and 1938. Produced in Technicolor, these cartoons were very...
- free energy as a Taylor expansion in the order parameter. For example, the Ising model free energy in the vicinity of the phase transition may be written...
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