Definition of Inflectional. Meaning of Inflectional. Synonyms of Inflectional

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Inflectional. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Inflectional and, of course, Inflectional synonyms and on the right images related to the word Inflectional.

Definition of Inflectional

Inflectional
Inflectional In*flec"tion*al, a. Of or pertaining to inflection; having, or characterized by, inflection. --Max M["u]ller.

Meaning of Inflectional from wikipedia

- ISBN 0-521-63199-8 (hb). SIL: What is inflection? SIL: What is an inflectional affix? SIL: What is an inflectional category? SIL: What is a morphological...
- conjugation of verbs. An inflectional suffix is sometimes called a desinence or a grammatical suffix or ending. Inflection changes the grammatical properties...
- In differential calculus, an inflection point, point of inflection, flex, or inflection (British English: inflexion[citation needed]) is a point on a continuous...
- cl****ified as derivational or inflectional morphemes. The main difference between derivational morphemes and inflectional morphemes is their function for...
- that incorporate it, an inflectional phrase or inflection phrase (IP or InflP) is a functional phrase that has inflectional properties (such as tense...
- Inflection (or inflexion), is the modification of a word to express grammatical information. Inflection or inflexion may also refer to: Inflection point...
- languages have a low morpheme-per-word ratio, especially with respect to inflectional morphemes. A grammatical construction can similarly be analytic if it...
- is a type of language with a very low morpheme per word ratio and no inflectional morphology whatsoever. In the extreme case, each word contains a single...
- derivational information. The suffix is composed of all inflectional morphemes, and carries only inflectional information. The compound root morpheme + derivational...
- inflectional rules, while those of the second kind are rules of word formation. The generation of the English plural dogs from dog is an inflectional...
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