Definition of Easing. Meaning of Easing. Synonyms of Easing

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Definition of Easing

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Appeasing
Appease Ap*pease", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Appealed; p. pr. & vb. n. Appeasing.] [OE. apesen, apaisen, OF. apaisier, apaissier, F. apaiser, fr. a (L. ad) + OF. pais peace, F. paix, fr. L. pax, pacis. See Peace.] To make quiet; to calm; to reduce to a state of peace; to still; to pacify; to dispel (anger or hatred); as, to appease the tumult of the ocean, or of the passions; to appease hunger or thirst. Syn: To pacify; quiet; conciliate; propitiate; assuage; compose; calm; allay; hush; soothe; tranquilize.
Ceasing
Cease Cease (s[=e]s), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Ceased; p. pr. & vb. n. Ceasing.] [OE. cessen, cesen, F. cesser, fr. L. cessare, v. intemsive fr. cedere to withdraw. See Cede, and cf. Cessation.] 1. To come to an end; to stop; to leave off or give over; to desist; as, the noise ceased. ``To cease from strife.' --Prov. xx. 3. 2. To be wanting; to fail; to pass away. The poor shall never cease out of the land. --Deut. xv. 11. Syn: To intermit; desist; stop; abstain; quit; discontinue; refrain; leave off; pause; end.
Creasing
Creasing Creas"ing (kr[=e]s"[i^]ng), n. (Arch.) A layer of tiles forming a corona for a wall. --Knight.
Decreasing
Decreasing De*creas"ing, a. Becoming less and less; diminishing. -- De*creas"ing*ly, adv. Decreasing series (Math.), a series in which each term is numerically smaller than the preceding term.
Decreasing series
Decreasing De*creas"ing, a. Becoming less and less; diminishing. -- De*creas"ing*ly, adv. Decreasing series (Math.), a series in which each term is numerically smaller than the preceding term.
Decreasingly
Decreasing De*creas"ing, a. Becoming less and less; diminishing. -- De*creas"ing*ly, adv. Decreasing series (Math.), a series in which each term is numerically smaller than the preceding term.
Diseasing
Disease Dis*ease", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Diseased; p. pr. & vb. n. Diseasing.] 1. To deprive of ease; to disquiet; to trouble; to distress. [Obs.] His double burden did him sore disease. --Spenser. 2. To derange the vital functions of; to afflict with disease or sickness; to disorder; -- used almost exclusively in the participle diseased. He was diseased in body and mind. --Macaulay.
Displeasing
Displeasing Dis*pleas"ing, a. Causing displeasure or dissatisfaction; offensive; disagreeable. -- Dis*pleas"ing*ly, adv. -- Dis*pleas"ing*ness, n. --Locke.
Displeasingly
Displeasing Dis*pleas"ing, a. Causing displeasure or dissatisfaction; offensive; disagreeable. -- Dis*pleas"ing*ly, adv. -- Dis*pleas"ing*ness, n. --Locke.
Displeasingness
Displeasing Dis*pleas"ing, a. Causing displeasure or dissatisfaction; offensive; disagreeable. -- Dis*pleas"ing*ly, adv. -- Dis*pleas"ing*ness, n. --Locke.
Greasing
Grease Grease (gr[=e]z or gr[=e]s; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Greased (gr[=e]zd or gr[=e]sd); p. pr. & vb. n. Greasing.] 1. To smear, anoint, or daub, with grease or fat; to lubricate; as, to grease the wheels of a wagon. 2. To bribe; to corrupt with presents. The greased advocate that grinds the poor. --Dryden. 3. To cheat or cozen; to overreach. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl. 4. (Far.) To affect (a horse) with grease, the disease. To grease in the hand, to corrupt by bribes. --Usher.
Impleasing
Impleasing Im*pleas"ing, a. Unpleasing; displeasing. [Obs.] --Overbury.
Increasingly
Increasingly In*creas"ing*ly, adv. More and more.
Leasing
Lease Lease, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Leased; p. pr. & vb. n. Leasing.] [F. laisser, OF. laissier, lessier, to leave, transmit, L. laxare to loose, slacken, from laxus loose, wide. See Lax, and cf. Lesser.] 1. To grant to another by lease the possession of, as of lands, tenements, and hereditaments; to let; to demise; as, a landowner leases a farm to a tenant; -- sometimes with out. There were some [houses] that were leased out for three lives. --Addison. 2. To hold under a lease; to take lease of; as, a tenant leases his land from the owner.
Pleasing
Please Please, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pleased; p. pr. & vb. n. Pleasing.] [OE. plesen, OF. plaisir, fr. L. placere, akin to placare to reconcile. Cf. Complacent, Placable, Placid, Plea, Plead, Pleasure.] 1. To give pleasure to; to excite agreeable sensations or emotions in; to make glad; to gratify; to content; to satisfy. I pray to God that it may plesen you. --Chaucer. What next I bring shall please thee, be assured. --Milton. 2. To have or take pleasure in; hence, to choose; to wish; to desire; to will. Whatsoever the Lord pleased, that did he. --Ps. cxxxv. 6. A man doing as he wills, and doing as he pleases, are the same things in common speech. --J. Edwards. 3. To be the will or pleasure of; to seem good to; -- used impersonally. ``It pleased the Father that in him should all fullness dwell.' --Col. i. 19. To-morrow, may it please you. --Shak. To be pleased in or with, to have complacency in; to take pleasure in. To be pleased to do a thing, to take pleasure in doing it; to have the will to do it; to think proper to do it. --Dryden.
Pleasing
Pleasing Pleas"ing, a. Giving pleasure or satisfaction; causing agreeable emotion; agreeable; delightful; as, a pleasing prospect; pleasing manners. ``Pleasing harmony.' --Shak. ``Pleasing features.' --Macaulay. -- Pleas"ing*ly, adv. -- Pleas"ing*ness, n. Syn: Gratifying; delightful; agreeable. See Pleasant.
Pleasing
Pleasing Pleas"ing, n. An object of pleasure. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Pleasingly
Pleasing Pleas"ing, a. Giving pleasure or satisfaction; causing agreeable emotion; agreeable; delightful; as, a pleasing prospect; pleasing manners. ``Pleasing harmony.' --Shak. ``Pleasing features.' --Macaulay. -- Pleas"ing*ly, adv. -- Pleas"ing*ness, n. Syn: Gratifying; delightful; agreeable. See Pleasant.
Pleasingness
Pleasing Pleas"ing, a. Giving pleasure or satisfaction; causing agreeable emotion; agreeable; delightful; as, a pleasing prospect; pleasing manners. ``Pleasing harmony.' --Shak. ``Pleasing features.' --Macaulay. -- Pleas"ing*ly, adv. -- Pleas"ing*ness, n. Syn: Gratifying; delightful; agreeable. See Pleasant.
Releasing
Release Re*lease" (r?-l?s"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Released (r?*l?st"); p. pr. & vb. n. Releasing.] [OE. relessen, OF. relassier, to release, to let free. See Relay, n., Relax, and cf. Release to lease again.] 1. To let loose again; to set free from restraint, confinement, or servitude; to give liberty to, or to set at liberty; to let go. Now at that feast he released unto them one prisoner, whomsoever they desired. --Mark xv. 6. 2. To relieve from something that confines, burdens, or oppresses, as from pain, trouble, obligation, penalty. 3. (Law) To let go, as a legal claim; to discharge or relinquish a right to, as lands or tenements, by conveying to another who has some right or estate in possession, as when the person in remainder releases his right to the tenant in possession; to quit. 4. To loosen; to relax; to remove the obligation of; as, to release an ordinance. [Obs.] --Hooker. A sacred vow that none should aye release. --Spenser. Syn: To free; liberate; loose; discharge; disengage; extricate; let go; quit; acquit.
Teasing
Tease Tease, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Teased; p. pr. & vb. n. Teasing.] [AS. t?san to pluck, tease; akin to OD. teesen, MHG. zeisen, Dan. t[ae]se, t[ae]sse. [root]58. Cf. Touse.] 1. To comb or card, as wool or flax. ``Teasing matted wool.' --Wordsworth. 2. To stratch, as cloth, for the purpose of raising a nap; teasel. 3. (Anat.) To tear or separate into minute shreds, as with needles or similar instruments. 4. To vex with importunity or impertinence; to harass, annoy, disturb, or irritate by petty requests, or by jests and raillery; to plague. --Cowper. He . . . suffered them to tease him into acts directly opposed to his strongest inclinations. --Macaulay. Syn: To vex; harass: annoy; disturb; irritate; plague; torment; mortify; tantalize; chagrin. Usage: Tease, Vex. To tease is literally to pull or scratch, and implies a prolonged annoyance in respect to little things, which is often more irritating, and harder to bear, than severe pain. Vex meant originally to seize and bear away hither and thither, and hence, to disturb; as, to vex the ocean with storms. This sense of the term now rarely occurs; but vex is still a stronger word than tease, denoting the disturbance or anger created by minor provocations, losses, disappointments, etc. We are teased by the buzzing of a fly in our eyes; we are vexed by the carelessness or stupidity of our servants. Not by the force of carnal reason, But indefatigable teasing. --Hudibras. In disappointments, where the affections have been strongly placed, and the expectations sanguine, particularly where the agency of others is concerned, sorrow may degenerate into vexation and chagrin. --Cogan. Tease tenon (Joinery), a long tenon at the top of a post to receive two beams crossing each other one above the other.

Meaning of Easing from wikipedia

- Federal Reserve quantitative easing program after the 2008 crisis "unprecedented". A policy termed "quantitative easing" (量的金融緩和, ryōteki kin'yū kanwa)...
- An ea****t is a nonpossessory right to use and/or enter onto the real property of another without possessing it. It is "best typified in the right of...
- NetEase, Inc. (simplified Chinese: 网易; traditional Chinese: 網易; pinyin: WǎngYì) is a Chinese Internet technology company providing online services centered...
- At Ease was an alternative to the Macintosh desktop developed by Apple Computer in the early 1990s for the cl****ic Mac OS. It provided a simple environment...
- Ease or EASE may refer to: Ease (programming language) Enhanced Acoustic Simulator for Engineers, software for optimizing acoustics Methylone, marketed...
- Ease of movement (EMV) is an indicator used in technical analysis to relate an ****et's price change to its volume. Ease of Movement was developed by Richard...
- People's Quantitative Easing should the economy move into another downturn despite the use of traditional quantitative easing (QE) policies. In August...
- the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for easing poverty, expanding women's rights, building religious and ethnic amity,...
- A chapel of ease (or chapel-of-ease) is a church building other than the parish church, built within the bounds of a parish for the attendance of those...
- No Longer at Ease is a 1960 novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. It is the story of an Igbo man, Obi Okonkwo, who leaves his village for an education...
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