Definition of Discretionary. Meaning of Discretionary. Synonyms of Discretionary

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Discretionary. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Discretionary and, of course, Discretionary synonyms and on the right images related to the word Discretionary.

Definition of Discretionary

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Meaning of Discretionary from wikipedia

- In American public finance, discretionary spending is government spending implemented through an appropriations bill. This spending is an optional part...
- A discretionary trust, in the trust law of England, Australia, Canada and other common law jurisdictions, is a trust where the beneficiaries and/or their...
- In macroeconomics, discretionary policy is an economic policy based on the ad hoc judgment of policymakers as opposed to policy set by predetermined rules...
- A Discretionary Housing Payment is a discretionary and short-term payment made in the United Kingdom that helps people with their housing costs To get...
- "A Marketer's Guide to Discretionary Income (abstract)". US Department of Education. Retrieved 2007-12-27. A simple discretionary income calculator—even...
- In computer security, discretionary access control (DAC) is a type of access control defined by the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria "as a...
- include media and entertainment companies previously in the consumer discretionary sector, as well as interactive media and services companies from the...
- A discretionary service is a Canadian specialty channel which, as defined by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, may be carried...
- A discretionary deposit is the term given to a device by medieval European bankers as a method of cir****venting Catholic canon law edicts prohibiting...
- Discretionary jurisdiction is a cir****stance where a court has the power to decide whether to hear a particular case brought before it. Most courts have...
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