Definition of Disco. Meaning of Disco. Synonyms of Disco

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Definition of Disco

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A discors
Teal Teal, n. [OE. tele; akin to D. teling a generation, production, teal, telen to breed, produce, and E. till to cultivate. The English word probably once meant, a brood or flock. See Till to cultivate.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small fresh-water ducks of the genus Anas and the subgenera Querquedula and Nettion. The male is handsomely colored, and has a bright green or blue speculum on the wings. Note: The common European teal (Anas crecca) and the European blue-winged teal, or garganey (A. querquedula or A. circia), are well-known species. In America the blue-winged teal (A. discors), the green-winged teal (A. Carolinensis), and the cinnamon teal (A. cynaoptera) are common species, valued as game birds. See Garganey. Goose teal, a goslet. See Goslet. Teal duck, the common European teal.
Apple of discord
Discord Dis"cord`, n. [OE. discord, descord, OF. discorde, descorde, F. discorde, from L. discordia, fr. discors, -cordis, discordant, disagreeable; dis- + cor, cordis, heart; cf. F. discord, n., and OF. descorder, discorder, F. discorder, to discord, L. discordare, from discors. See Heart, and cf. Discord, v. i.] 1. Want of concord or agreement; absence of unity or harmony in sentiment or action; variance leading to contention and strife; disagreement; -- applied to persons or to things, and to thoughts, feelings, or purposes. A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren. --Prov. vi. 19. Peace to arise out of universal discord fomented in all parts of the empire. --Burke. 2. (Mus.) Union of musical sounds which strikes the ear harshly or disagreeably, owing to the incommensurability of the vibrations which they produce; want of musical concord or harmony; a chord demanding resolution into a concord. For a discord itself is but a harshness of divers sounds m???ing. --Bacon. Apple of discord. See under Apple. Syn: Variance; difference; opposition; contrariety; clashing; dissension; contention; strife; disagreement; dissonance.
At discovert
Discovert Dis*cov"ert, n. An uncovered place or part. [Obs.] At discovert, uncovered. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Bank discount
Bank discount Bank discount A sum equal to the interest at a given rate on the principal (face) of a bill or note from the time of discounting until it becomes due.
Callithrix discolor
Onappo O*nap"po, n. (Zo["o]l.) A nocturnal South American monkey (Callithrix discolor), noted for its agility; -- called also ventriloquist monkey.
Dendroica discolor
Prairie Prai"rie, n. [F., an extensive meadow, OF. praerie, LL. prataria, fr. L. pratum a meadow.] 1. An extensive tract of level or rolling land, destitute of trees, covered with coarse grass, and usually characterized by a deep, fertile soil. They abound throughout the Mississippi valley, between the Alleghanies and the Rocky mountains. From the forests and the prairies, From the great lakes of the northland. --Longfellow. 2. A meadow or tract of grass; especially, a so called natural meadow. Prairie chicken (Zo["o]l.), any American grouse of the genus Tympanuchus, especially T. Americanus (formerly T. cupido), which inhabits the prairies of the central United States. Applied also to the sharp-tailed grouse. Prairie clover (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Petalostemon, having small rosy or white flowers in dense terminal heads or spikes. Several species occur in the prairies of the United States. Prairie dock (Bot.), a coarse composite plant (Silphium terebinthaceum) with large rough leaves and yellow flowers, found in the Western prairies. Prairie dog (Zo["o]l.), a small American rodent (Cynomys Ludovicianus) allied to the marmots. It inhabits the plains west of the Mississippi. The prairie dogs burrow in the ground in large warrens, and have a sharp bark like that of a dog. Called also prairie marmot. Prairie grouse. Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie hare (Zo["o]l.), a large long-eared Western hare (Lepus campestris). See Jack rabbit, under 2d Jack. Prairie hawk, Prairie falcon (Zo["o]l.), a falcon of Western North America (Falco Mexicanus). The upper parts are brown. The tail has transverse bands of white; the under parts, longitudinal streaks and spots of brown. Prairie hen. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie itch (Med.), an affection of the skin attended with intense itching, which is observed in the Northern and Western United States; -- also called swamp itch, winter itch. Prairie marmot. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie dog, above. Prairie mole (Zo["o]l.), a large American mole (Scalops argentatus), native of the Western prairies. Prairie pigeon, plover, or snipe (Zo["o]l.), the upland plover. See Plover, n., 2. Prairie rattlesnake (Zo["o]l.), the massasauga. Prairie snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless American snake (Masticophis flavigularis). It is pale yellow, tinged with brown above. Prairie squirrel (Zo["o]l.), any American ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus, inhabiting prairies; -- called also gopher. Prairie turnip (Bot.), the edible turnip-shaped farinaceous root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta) of the Upper Missouri region; also, the plant itself. Called also pomme blanche, and pomme de prairie. Prairie warbler (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored American warbler (Dendroica discolor). The back is olive yellow, with a group of reddish spots in the middle; the under parts and the parts around the eyes are bright yellow; the sides of the throat and spots along the sides, black; three outer tail feathers partly white. Prairie wolf. (Zo["o]l.) See Coyote.
Diospyros discolor
Mabolo Ma*bo"lo, n. (Bot.) A kind of persimmon tree (Diospyros discolor) from the Philippine Islands, now introduced into the East and West Indies. It bears an edible fruit as large as a quince.
Direct discourse
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See Dress, and cf. Dirge.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. 2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. Be even and direct with me. --Shak. 3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. 4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. 5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. Direct action. (Mach.) See Direct-acting. Direct discourse (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;' -- correlative to indirect discourse, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, oratio directa, and oratio obliqua. Direct evidence (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton. Direct examination (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott. Direct fire (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at. Direct process (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight. Direct tax, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise.
Discoast
Discoast Dis*coast", v. i. [Pref. dis- + coast: cf. It. discostare.] To depart; to quit the coast (that is, the side or border) of anything; to be separated. [Obs.] As far as heaven and earth discoasted lie. --G. Fletcher. To discoast from the plain and simple way of speech. --Barrow.
Discoblastic
Discoblastic Dis`co*blas"tic, a. [Gr. ? disk + ? to grow.] (Biol.) Applied to a form of egg cleavage seen in osseous fishes, which occurs only in a small disk that separates from the rest of the egg.
Discoboli
Discobolus Dis*cob"o*lus, n.; pl. Discoboli. [L., fr. Gr. ?; ? a discu + ? to throw.] (Fine Arts) (a) A thrower of the discus. (b) A statue of an athlete holding the discus, or about to throw it. Note: The Discobolus of Myron was a famous statue of antiquity, and several copies or imitations of it have been preserved.
Discobolus
Discobolus Dis*cob"o*lus, n.; pl. Discoboli. [L., fr. Gr. ?; ? a discu + ? to throw.] (Fine Arts) (a) A thrower of the discus. (b) A statue of an athlete holding the discus, or about to throw it. Note: The Discobolus of Myron was a famous statue of antiquity, and several copies or imitations of it have been preserved.
Discodactyl
Discodactyl Dis`co*dac"tyl, n. [See Discodactylia.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the tree frogs.
Discodactylia
Discodactylia Dis`co*dac*tyl"i*a, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. ? disk + ? finger.] (Zo["o]l.) A division of amphibians having suctorial disks on the toes, as the tree frogs.
Discodactylous
Discodactylous Dis`co*dac"tyl*ous, a. (Zo["o]l.) Having sucking disks on the toes, as the tree frogs.
Discoherent
Discoherent Dis`co*her"ent, a. Incoherent. [R.]
Discoid
Discoid Dis"coid, a. [Gr. ? quoit-shaped, ? a round plate, quoit + ? form, shape: cf. F. disco["i]de. See Disk.] Having the form of a disk, as those univalve shells which have the whorls in one plane, so as to form a disk, as the pearly nautilus. Discoid flower (Bot.), a compound flower, consisting of tubular florets only, as a tansy, lacking the rays which are seen in the daisy and sunflower.
Discoid
Discoid Dis"coid, n. Anything having the form of a discus or disk; particularly, a discoid shell.
Discoid flower
Discoid Dis"coid, a. [Gr. ? quoit-shaped, ? a round plate, quoit + ? form, shape: cf. F. disco["i]de. See Disk.] Having the form of a disk, as those univalve shells which have the whorls in one plane, so as to form a disk, as the pearly nautilus. Discoid flower (Bot.), a compound flower, consisting of tubular florets only, as a tansy, lacking the rays which are seen in the daisy and sunflower.
Discoidal
Discoidal Dis*coid"al, a. [Cf. F. disco["i]dal.] Disk-shaped; discoid.
Discolith
Discolith Dis"co*lith, n. [Gr. ? a round plate + -lith.] (Biol.) One of a species of coccoliths, having an oval discoidal body, with a thick strongly refracting rim, and a thinner central portion. One of them measures about 1/50000 of an inch in its longest diameter.
Discolorate
Discolorate Dis*col"or*ate, v. t. To discolor. [R.] --Fuller.
Discoloration
Discoloration Dis*col`or*a"tion, n. [Cf. F. decoloration.] 1. The act of discoloring, or the state of being discolored; alteration of hue or appearance. --Darwin. 2. A discolored spot; a stain. --Arbuthnot.
Discolored
Discolored Dis*col"ored, a. 1. Altered in color; ?tained. 2. Variegated; of divers colors. [R.] That ever wore discolored arms. --Chapman.
Discomfit
Discomfit Dis*com"fit, a. Discomfited; overthrown. [Obs.]
Discomfit
Discomfit Dis*com"fit, n. Rout; overthrow; discomfiture. Such as discomfort as shall quite despoil him. --Milton.
Discomfortable
Discomfortable Dis*com"fort*a*ble, a. [Cf. OF. desconfortable.] 1. Causing discomfort; occasioning uneasiness; making sad. [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney. 2. Destitute of comfort; uncomfortable. [R.] A labyrinth of little discomfortable garrets. --Thackeray. -- Dis*com"fort*a*ble*ness, n. [Obs.]
Discomfortableness
Discomfortable Dis*com"fort*a*ble, a. [Cf. OF. desconfortable.] 1. Causing discomfort; occasioning uneasiness; making sad. [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney. 2. Destitute of comfort; uncomfortable. [R.] A labyrinth of little discomfortable garrets. --Thackeray. -- Dis*com"fort*a*ble*ness, n. [Obs.]
Discommend
Discommend Dis`com*mend", v. t. 1. To mention with disapprobation; to blame; to disapprove. [R.] --Spenser. By commending something in him that is good, and discommending the same fault in others. --Jer. Taylor.
Discommendable
Discommendable Dis`com*mend"a*ble, a. Deserving, disapprobation or blame. -- Dis`com*mend"a*ble*ness, n.

Meaning of Disco from wikipedia

- Disco is a genre of dance music and a subculture that emerged in the 1970s from the United States' urban nightlife scene. Its sound is typified by four-on-the-floor...
- Disco is a genre of music originating in the 1970s. Disco or DISCO may also refer to: Discothèque, a nightclub that primarily plays disco music Disco...
- Panic! at the Disco is the solo project of American musician Brendon Urie. It was originally a pop rock band from Las Vegas, Nevada, formed in 2004 by...
- Disco Elysium is a role-playing video game developed and published by ZA/UM. The game takes place in a large city still recovering from a war decades...
- Disco Demolition Night was a Major League Baseball (MLB) promotion on Thursday, July 12, 1979, at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois, that ended in a...
- "From Disco to Disco" is a 1996 song recorded by German experimental house music project Whirlpool Productions. It is produced by Eric D. Clark, Justus...
- Disco Not Disco 3 also known as Disco Not Disco: Post Punk, Electro & Leftfield Disco Cl****ics 1974-1986 is the third and final compilation album from...
- Disco Raja is a 2020 Indian Telugu-language science fiction action film directed by Vi Anand and produced by Ram Talluri under SRT Entertainments banner...
- The term Disco Volante (Italian for "flying disc" or "flying saucer") may refer to; Il disco volante, 1964 Italian science fiction comedy Disco Volante...
- Italo disco (various capitalized, and sometimes hyphenated as Italo-disco) is a music genre which originated in Italy and was mainly produced in 1980s...
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