Definition of Burne. Meaning of Burne. Synonyms of Burne

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Burne. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Burne and, of course, Burne synonyms and on the right images related to the word Burne.

Definition of Burne

No result for Burne. Showing similar results...

Barnburner
Barnburner Barn"burn`er, n. [So called in allusion to the fable of the man who burned his barn in order to rid it of rats.] A member of the radical section of the Democratic party in New York, about the middle of the 19th century, which was hostile to extension of slavery, public debts, corporate privileges, etc., and supported Van Buren against Cass for president in 1848; -- opposed to Hunker. [Political Cant, U. S.]
Base-burner
Base-burner Base"-burn`er, n. A furnace or stove in which the fuel is contained in a hopper or chamber, and is fed to the fire as the lower stratum is consumed.
Bude burner
Bude burner Bude" burn`er [See Bude light.] A burner consisting of two or more concentric Argand burners (the inner rising above the outer) and a central tube by which oxygen gas or common air is supplied.
Burned
Burned Burned, p. p. Burnished. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Burned
Burned Burned, p. p. & a. See Burnt.
Burnet
Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis.
Burnet moth
Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis.
Burnet saxifrage
Saxifrage Sax"i*frage (?; 48), n. [L. saxifraga, from saxifragus stone-breaking; saxum rock + frangere to break: cf. F. saxifrage. See Fracture, and cf. Sassafras, Saxon.] (Bot.) Any plant of the genus Saxifraga, mostly perennial herbs growing in crevices of rocks in mountainous regions. Burnet saxifrage, a European umbelliferous plant (Pimpinella Saxifraga). Golden saxifrage, a low half-succulent herb (Chrysosplenium oppositifolium) growing in rivulets in Europe; also, C. Americanum, common in the United States. See also under Golden. Meadow saxifrage, or Pepper saxifrage. See under Meadow.
Burnet saxifrage
Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis.
Burnettize
Burnettize Bur"nett*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Burnettized; p. pr. & vb. n. Burnettizing.] (Manuf.) To subject (wood, fabrics, etc.) to a process of saturation in a solution of chloride of zinc, to prevent decay; -- a process invented by Sir William Burnett.
Burnettized
Burnettize Bur"nett*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Burnettized; p. pr. & vb. n. Burnettizing.] (Manuf.) To subject (wood, fabrics, etc.) to a process of saturation in a solution of chloride of zinc, to prevent decay; -- a process invented by Sir William Burnett.
Burnettizing
Burnettize Bur"nett*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Burnettized; p. pr. & vb. n. Burnettizing.] (Manuf.) To subject (wood, fabrics, etc.) to a process of saturation in a solution of chloride of zinc, to prevent decay; -- a process invented by Sir William Burnett.
Canadian burnet
Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis.
Eburnean
Eburnean E*bur"ne*an, a. [L. eburneus, fr. ebur ivory. See Ivory.] Made of or relating to ivory.
Fish-tail burner
Fish-tail Fish"-tail`, a. Like the of a fish; acting, or producing something, like the tail of a fish. Fish-tail burner, a gas burner that gives a spreading flame shaped somewhat like the tail of a fish. Fish-tail propeller (Steamship), a propeller with a single blade that oscillates like the tail of a fish when swimming.
Flash burner
Flash burner Flash burner A gas burner with a device for lighting by an electric spark.
Gas-burner
Gas-burner Gas"-burn`er, n. The jet piece of a gas fixture where the gas is burned as it escapes from one or more minute orifices.
Great burnet
Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis.
Heartburned
Heartburned Heart"burned`, a. Having heartburn. --Shak.
Hydrocarbon burner
Hydrocarbon Hy`dro*car"bon, n. [Hydro-, 2 + carbon.] (Chem.) A compound containing only hydrogen and carbon, as methane, benzene, etc.; also, by extension, any of their derivatives. Hydrocarbon burner, furnace, stove, a burner, furnace, or stove with which liquid fuel, as petroleum, is used.
Larus eburneus
Serrator Ser*ra"tor, n. [NL.] (Zo["o]l.) The ivory gull (Larus eburneus).
Lime burner
Lime burner, one who burns limestone, shells, etc., to make lime. Lime light. See Calcium light, under Calcium.
Salad burnet
Salad burnet (Bot.), the common burnet (Poterium Sanguisorba), sometimes eaten as a salad in Italy.
Sunburned
Sunburn Sun"burn`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sunburnedor Sunburnt; p. pr. & vb. n. Sunburning.] To burn or discolor by the sun; to tan. Sunburnt and swarthy though she be. --Dryden.
Sun-burner
Sun-burner Sun"-burn`er, n. A circle or cluster of gas-burners for lighting and ventilating public buildings.
Vapor burner
Vapor Va"por, n. [OE. vapour, OF. vapour, vapor, vapeur, F. vapeur, L. vapor; probably for cvapor, and akin to Gr. ? smoke, ? to breathe forth, Lith. kvepti to breathe, smell, Russ. kopote fine soot. Cf. Vapid.] [Written also vapour.] 1. (Physics) Any substance in the gaseous, or a["e]riform, state, the condition of which is ordinarily that of a liquid or solid. Note: The term vapor is sometimes used in a more extended sense, as identical with gas; and the difference between the two is not so much one of kind as of degree, the latter being applied to all permanently elastic fluids except atmospheric air, the former to those elastic fluids which lose that condition at ordinary temperatures. The atmosphere contains more or less vapor of water, a portion of which, on a reduction of temperature, becomes condensed into liquid water in the form of rain or dew. The vapor of water produced by boiling, especially in its economic relations, is called steam. Vapor is any substance in the gaseous condition at the maximum of density consistent with that condition. This is the strict and proper meaning of the word vapor. --Nichol. 2. In a loose and popular sense, any visible diffused substance floating in the atmosphere and impairing its transparency, as smoke, fog, etc. The vapour which that fro the earth glood [glided]. --Chaucer. Fire and hail; snow and vapors; stormy wind fulfilling his word. --Ps. cxlviii. 8. 3. Wind; flatulence. [Obs.] --Bacon. 4. Something unsubstantial, fleeting, or transitory; unreal fancy; vain imagination; idle talk; boasting. For what is your life? It is even a vapor, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away. --James iv. 14. 5. pl. An old name for hypochondria, or melancholy; the blues. ``A fit of vapors.' --Pope. 6. (Pharm.) A medicinal agent designed for administration in the form of inhaled vapor. --Brit. Pharm. Vapor bath. (a) A bath in vapor; the application of vapor to the body, or part of it, in a close place; also, the place itself. (b) (Chem.) A small metallic drying oven, usually of copper, for drying and heating filter papers, precipitates, etc.; -- called also air bath. A modified form is provided with a jacket in the outside partition for holding water, or other volatile liquid, by which the temperature may be limited exactly to the required degree. Vapor burner, a burner for burning a vaporized hydrocarbon. Vapor density (Chem.), the relative weight of gases and vapors as compared with some specific standard, usually hydrogen, but sometimes air. The vapor density of gases and vaporizable substances as compared with hydrogen, when multiplied by two, or when compared with air and multiplied by 28.8, gives the molecular weight. Vapor engine, an engine worked by the expansive force of a vapor, esp. a vapor other than steam.
Welsbach burner
Welsbach Wels"bach, a. Of or pertaining to Auer von Welsbach or the incandescent gas burner invented by him. Welsbach burner, a burner in which the combustion of a mixture of air and gas or vapor is employed to heat to incandescence a mantle composed of thoria and ceria. The mantle is made by soaking a ``stocking' in a solution of nitrates of thorium and cerium (approx. 99 : 1), drying, and, for use, igniting to burn the thread and convert the nitrates into oxides, which remain as a fragile ash. The light far exceeds that obtained from the same amount of gas with the ordinary fishtail burner, but has a slight greenish hue.
Wild burnet
Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis.

Meaning of Burne from wikipedia

- Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, 1st Baronet, ARA (/bɜːnˈdʒəʊnz/; 28 August 1833 – 17 June 1898) was a British artist and designer ****ociated with the phase...
- Burne (variations: Byrnes, Byrne, O'Byrne, O'Byrnes, Burns, Beirne, Bourne) is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Alfred Burne (1886–1959)...
- Burne Hogarth (born Spinoza Bernard Ginsburg, December 25, 1911 – January 28, 1996) was an American artist and educator, best known for his work on the...
- Burden, and developed close friendships with Pre-Raphaelite artists Edward Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rossetti and with Neo-Gothic architect Philip Webb...
- Philip William Burne-Jones, 2nd Baronet (1 October 1861 – 21 June 1926) was the first child of the British Pre-Raphaelite artist Sir Edward Burne-Jones and...
- Georgiana Burne-Jones, Lady Burne-Jones (Birmingham, 21 July 1840 – 2 February 1920) was a painter and engraver, and the second oldest of the Macdonald...
- Christopher F. Burne is a United States Air Force Lieutenant General and was Judge Advocate General of the Air Force from May 2014 until May 2018. He...
- Stillman. Later followers of the principles of the Brotherhood included Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris and John William Waterhouse. The group sought a return...
- Nancy Burne (23 December 1907, in Chorlton, Lancashire – 25 March 1954) was an English stage and film actress. She began her film career at British International...
- Alfred Higgins Burne DSO (1886–1959) was a soldier and military historian. He invented the concept of Inherent Military Probability; in battles and campaigns...
Loading...