Definition of Appositely. Meaning of Appositely. Synonyms of Appositely

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Appositely. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Appositely and, of course, Appositely synonyms and on the right images related to the word Appositely.

Definition of Appositely

Appositely
Apposite Ap"po*site, a. [L. appositus, p. p. of apponere to set or put to; ad + ponere to put, place.] Very applicable; well adapted; suitable or fit; relevant; pat; -- followed by to; as, this argument is very apposite to the case. -- Ap"po*site*ly, adv. -- Ap"po*site*ness, n.

Meaning of Appositely from wikipedia

- elements are said to be in apposition. One of the elements is called the appositive, although its identification requires consideration of how the elements...
- noun adjunct, attributive noun, qualifying noun, noun (pre)modifier, or apposite noun is an optional noun that modifies another noun; it is a noun functioning...
- a colon after an independent clause to direct attention to a list, an appositive or a quotation, and it can be used between independent clauses if the...
- good dancer. The phrase a great singer, set off by commas, is both an appositive and a parenthesis. A dog (not a cat) is an animal that barks. The phrase...
- writer's mother because it uses punctuation identical to that used for an appositive phrase, leaving it unclear whether this is a list of three entities (1...
- Fleming. As a result, Broccoli and Saltzman chose Dr. No: the timing was apposite, with claims that American rocket testing at Cape Canaveral had problems...
- Adverb Anaphora Answer ellipsis Antecedent Antecedent-contained deletion Appositive Argument Article Aspect Attributive adjective and predicative adjective...
- comma after "mother" is conventionally used to prepare the reader for an apposite phrase – that is, a renaming of or further information about a noun – this...
- (see also: Predicative expression, Subject complement); or (c) as an appositive adjective within a noun phrase, e.g. "My kids, [who are] happy to go cruising...
- head of a stalk of wheat or rye; or less commonly (but arguably more appositely) "flood, torrent". The modern use derives from an account in the Hebrew...
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