Definition of Appar. Meaning of Appar. Synonyms of Appar

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Definition of Appar

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Apparaillyng
Apparaillyng Ap*par"ail*lyng, n. [See Apparel, n. & v.] Preparation. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Apparatus
Apparatus Ap"pa*ratus, n.; pl. Apparatus, also rarely Apparatuses. [L., from apparare, apparatum, to prepare; ad + prepare to make ready.] 1. Things provided as means to some end. 2. Hence: A full collection or set of implements, or utensils, for a given duty, experimental or operative; any complex instrument or appliance, mechanical or chemical, for a specific action or operation; machinery; mechanism. 3. (Physiol.) A collection of organs all of which unite in a common function; as, the respiratory apparatus.
Apparatus
Apparatus Ap"pa*ratus, n.; pl. Apparatus, also rarely Apparatuses. [L., from apparare, apparatum, to prepare; ad + prepare to make ready.] 1. Things provided as means to some end. 2. Hence: A full collection or set of implements, or utensils, for a given duty, experimental or operative; any complex instrument or appliance, mechanical or chemical, for a specific action or operation; machinery; mechanism. 3. (Physiol.) A collection of organs all of which unite in a common function; as, the respiratory apparatus.
Apparatuses
Apparatus Ap"pa*ratus, n.; pl. Apparatus, also rarely Apparatuses. [L., from apparare, apparatum, to prepare; ad + prepare to make ready.] 1. Things provided as means to some end. 2. Hence: A full collection or set of implements, or utensils, for a given duty, experimental or operative; any complex instrument or appliance, mechanical or chemical, for a specific action or operation; machinery; mechanism. 3. (Physiol.) A collection of organs all of which unite in a common function; as, the respiratory apparatus.
Apparel
Apparel Ap*par"el, n. [OE. apparel, apareil, OF. apareil, appareil, preparation, provision, furniture, OF. apareiller to match, prepare, F. appareiller; OF. a (L. ad) + pareil like, similar, fr. LL. pariculus, dim. of L. par equal. See Pair.] 1. External clothing; vesture; garments; dress; garb; external habiliments or array. Fresh in his new apparel, proud and young. --Denham. At public devotion his resigned carriage made religion appear in the natural apparel of simplicity. --Tatler. 2. A small ornamental piece of embroidery worn on albs and some other ecclesiastical vestments. 3. (Naut.) The furniture of a ship, as masts, sails, rigging, anchors, guns, etc. Syn: Dress; clothing; vesture; garments; raiment; garb; costume; attire; habiliments.
Apparence
Apparence Ap*par"ence, n. [OF. aparence.] Appearance. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Apparency
Apparency Ap*par"en*cy, n. 1. Appearance. [Obs.] 2. Apparentness; state of being apparent. --Coleridge. 3. The position of being heir apparent.
Apparent
Apparent Ap*par"ent, a. [F. apparent, L. apparens, -entis, p. pr. of apparere. See Appear.] 1. Capable of being seen, or easily seen; open to view; visible to the eye; within sight or view. The moon . . . apparent queen. --Milton. 2. Clear or manifest to the understanding; plain; evident; obvious; known; palpable; indubitable. It is apparent foul play. --Shak. 3. Appearing to the eye or mind (distinguished from, but not necessarily opposed to, true or real); seeming; as the apparent motion or diameter of the sun. To live on terms of civility, and even of apparent friendship. --Macaulay. What Berkeley calls visible magnitude was by astronomers called apparent magnitude. --Reid. Apparent horizon, the circle which in a level plain bounds our view, and is formed by the apparent meeting of the earth and heavens, as distinguished from the rational horizon. Apparent time. See Time. Heir apparent (Law), one whose to an estate is indefeasible if he survives the ancestor; -- in distinction from presumptive heir. See Presumptive. Syn: Visible; distinct; plain; obvious; clear; certain; evident; manifest; indubitable; notorious.
apparent diameter
4. Greatness; grandeur. ``With plain, heroic magnitude of mind.' --Milton. 5. Greatness, in reference to influence or effect; importance; as, an affair of magnitude. The magnitude of his designs. --Bp. Horsley. Apparent magnitude (Opt.), the angular breadth of an object viewed as measured by the angle which it subtends at the eye of the observer; -- called also apparent diameter. Magnitude of a star (Astron.), the rank of a star with respect to brightness. About twenty very bright stars are said to be of first magnitude, the stars of the sixth magnitude being just visible to the naked eye. Telescopic stars are classified down to the twelfth magnitude or lower. The scale of the magnitudes is quite arbitrary, but by means of photometers, the classification has been made to tenths of a magnitude.
Apparent horizon
Apparent Ap*par"ent, a. [F. apparent, L. apparens, -entis, p. pr. of apparere. See Appear.] 1. Capable of being seen, or easily seen; open to view; visible to the eye; within sight or view. The moon . . . apparent queen. --Milton. 2. Clear or manifest to the understanding; plain; evident; obvious; known; palpable; indubitable. It is apparent foul play. --Shak. 3. Appearing to the eye or mind (distinguished from, but not necessarily opposed to, true or real); seeming; as the apparent motion or diameter of the sun. To live on terms of civility, and even of apparent friendship. --Macaulay. What Berkeley calls visible magnitude was by astronomers called apparent magnitude. --Reid. Apparent horizon, the circle which in a level plain bounds our view, and is formed by the apparent meeting of the earth and heavens, as distinguished from the rational horizon. Apparent time. See Time. Heir apparent (Law), one whose to an estate is indefeasible if he survives the ancestor; -- in distinction from presumptive heir. See Presumptive. Syn: Visible; distinct; plain; obvious; clear; certain; evident; manifest; indubitable; notorious.
Apparent magnitude
4. Greatness; grandeur. ``With plain, heroic magnitude of mind.' --Milton. 5. Greatness, in reference to influence or effect; importance; as, an affair of magnitude. The magnitude of his designs. --Bp. Horsley. Apparent magnitude (Opt.), the angular breadth of an object viewed as measured by the angle which it subtends at the eye of the observer; -- called also apparent diameter. Magnitude of a star (Astron.), the rank of a star with respect to brightness. About twenty very bright stars are said to be of first magnitude, the stars of the sixth magnitude being just visible to the naked eye. Telescopic stars are classified down to the twelfth magnitude or lower. The scale of the magnitudes is quite arbitrary, but by means of photometers, the classification has been made to tenths of a magnitude.
Apparent time
Apparent Ap*par"ent, a. [F. apparent, L. apparens, -entis, p. pr. of apparere. See Appear.] 1. Capable of being seen, or easily seen; open to view; visible to the eye; within sight or view. The moon . . . apparent queen. --Milton. 2. Clear or manifest to the understanding; plain; evident; obvious; known; palpable; indubitable. It is apparent foul play. --Shak. 3. Appearing to the eye or mind (distinguished from, but not necessarily opposed to, true or real); seeming; as the apparent motion or diameter of the sun. To live on terms of civility, and even of apparent friendship. --Macaulay. What Berkeley calls visible magnitude was by astronomers called apparent magnitude. --Reid. Apparent horizon, the circle which in a level plain bounds our view, and is formed by the apparent meeting of the earth and heavens, as distinguished from the rational horizon. Apparent time. See Time. Heir apparent (Law), one whose to an estate is indefeasible if he survives the ancestor; -- in distinction from presumptive heir. See Presumptive. Syn: Visible; distinct; plain; obvious; clear; certain; evident; manifest; indubitable; notorious.
Apparently
Apparently Ap*par"ent*ly, adv. 1. Visibly. [Obs.] --Hobbes. 2. Plainly; clearly; manifestly; evidently. If he should scorn me so apparently. --Shak. 3. Seemingly; in appearance; as, a man may be apparently friendly, yet malicious in heart.
Apparentness
Apparentness Ap*par"ent*ness, n. Plainness to the eye or the mind; visibleness; obviousness. [R.] --Sherwood.
Apparition
Apparition Ap`pa*ri"tion, n. [F. apparition, L. apparitio, fr. apparere. See Appear.] 1. The act of becoming visible; appearance; visibility. --Milton. The sudden apparition of the Spaniards. --Prescott. The apparition of Lawyer Clippurse occasioned much speculation in that portion of the world. --Sir W. Scott. 2. The thing appearing; a visible object; a form. Which apparition, it seems, was you. --Tatler. 3. An unexpected, wonderful, or preternatural appearance; a ghost; a specter; a phantom. ``The heavenly bands . . . a glorious apparition.' --Milton. I think it is the weakness of mine eyes That shapes this monstrous apparition. --Shak. 4. (Astron.) The first appearance of a star or other luminary after having been invisible or obscured; -- opposed to occultation. Circle of perpetual apparition. See under Circle.
Apparitional
Apparitional Ap`pa*ri"tion*al, a. Pertaining to an apparition or to apparitions; spectral. ``An apparitional soul.' --Tylor.
Apparitor
Apparitor Ap*par"i*tor, n. [L., fr. apparere. See Appear.] 1. Formerly, an officer who attended magistrates and judges to execute their orders. Before any of his apparitors could execute the sentence, he was himself summoned away by a sterner apparitor to the other world. --De Quincey. 2. (Law) A messenger or officer who serves the process of an ecclesiastical court. --Bouvier.
apparitor
Beadle Bea"dle, n. [OE. bedel, bidel, budel, OF. bedel, F. bedeau, fr. OHG. butil, putil, G. b["u]ttel, fr. OHG. biotan, G. bieten, to bid, confused with AS. bydel, the same word as OHG. butil. See. Bid, v.] 1. A messenger or crier of a court; a servitor; one who cites or bids persons to appear and answer; -- called also an apparitor or summoner. 2. An officer in a university, who precedes public processions of officers and students. [Eng.] Note: In this sense the archaic spellings bedel (Oxford) and bedell (Cambridge) are preserved. 3. An inferior parish officer in England having a variety of duties, as the preservation of order in church service, the chastisement of petty offenders, etc.
buffing apparatus
Buffer Buff"er (b[u^]f"[~e]r), n. [Prop a striker. See Buffet a blow.] 1. (Mech.) (a) An elastic apparatus or fender, for deadening the jar caused by the collision of bodies; as, a buffer at the end of a railroad car. (b) A pad or cushion forming the end of a fender, which receives the blow; -- sometimes called buffing apparatus. 2. One who polishes with a buff. 3. A wheel for buffing; a buff. 4. A good-humored, slow-witted fellow; -- usually said of an elderly man. [Colloq.] --Dickens.
Buffing apparatus
Buffing apparatus Buff"ing ap`pa*ra"tus See Buffer, 1.
Capparis sodado
Caperberry Ca"per*ber`ry, n. 1. The small olive-shaped berry of the European and Oriental caper, said to be used in pickles and as a condiment. 2. The currantlike fruit of the African and Arabian caper (Capparis sodado).
Capparis spinosa
Caper Ca"per, n. [F. c[^a]pre, fr. L. capparis, Gr. ?; cf. Ar. & Per. al-kabar.] 1. The pungent grayish green flower bud of the European and Oriental caper (Capparis spinosa), much used for pickles. 2. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Capparis; -- called also caper bush, caper tree. Note: The Capparis spinosa is a low prickly shrub of the Mediterranean coasts, with trailing branches and brilliant flowers; -- cultivated in the south of Europe for its buds. The C. sodada is an almost leafless spiny shrub of central Africa (Soudan), Arabia, and southern India, with edible berries. Bean caper. See Bran caper, in the Vocabulary. Caper sauce, a kind of sauce or catchup made of capers.
Capparis spinosa
Caper Ca"per, n. [F. c[^a]pre, fr. L. capparis, Gr. ?; cf. Ar. & Per. al-kabar.] 1. The pungent grayish green flower bud of the European and Oriental caper (Capparis spinosa), much used for pickles. 2. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Capparis; -- called also caper bush, caper tree. Note: The Capparis spinosa is a low prickly shrub of the Mediterranean coasts, with trailing branches and brilliant flowers; -- cultivated in the south of Europe for its buds. The C. sodada is an almost leafless spiny shrub of central Africa (Soudan), Arabia, and southern India, with edible berries. Bean caper. See Bran caper, in the Vocabulary. Caper sauce, a kind of sauce or catchup made of capers.
Capparis spinosa
Hyssop Hys"sop, n. [OE. hysope, ysope, OF. ysope, F. hysope, hyssope, L. hysopum, hyssopum, hyssopus, Gr. ?, ?, an aromatic plant, fr. Heb. [=e]sov.] A plant (Hyssopus officinalis). The leaves have an aromatic smell, and a warm, pungent taste. Note: The hyssop of Scripture is supposed to be a species of caper (Capparis spinosa), but probably the name was used for several different plants.
Circle of perpetual apparition
Apparition Ap`pa*ri"tion, n. [F. apparition, L. apparitio, fr. apparere. See Appear.] 1. The act of becoming visible; appearance; visibility. --Milton. The sudden apparition of the Spaniards. --Prescott. The apparition of Lawyer Clippurse occasioned much speculation in that portion of the world. --Sir W. Scott. 2. The thing appearing; a visible object; a form. Which apparition, it seems, was you. --Tatler. 3. An unexpected, wonderful, or preternatural appearance; a ghost; a specter; a phantom. ``The heavenly bands . . . a glorious apparition.' --Milton. I think it is the weakness of mine eyes That shapes this monstrous apparition. --Shak. 4. (Astron.) The first appearance of a star or other luminary after having been invisible or obscured; -- opposed to occultation. Circle of perpetual apparition. See under Circle.
Digestive apparatus
Digestive Di*gest"ive, a. [F. digestif, L. digestivus.] Pertaining to digestion; having the power to cause or promote digestion; as, the digestive ferments. Digestive cheese and fruit there sure will be. --B. Jonson. Digestive apparatus, the organs of food digestion, esp. the alimentary canal and glands connected with it. Digestive salt, the chloride of potassium.
Disapparel
Disapparel Dis`ap*par"el, v. t. [See Apparel, v. t.] [Pref. dis- + apparel: cf. OF. desapareiller.] To disrobe; to strip of apparel; to make naked. Drink disapparels the soul. --Junius (1635).
Germination apparatus
Germination Ger`mi*na"tion, n. [L. germinatio: cf. F. germination.] The process of germinating; the beginning of vegetation or growth in a seed or plant; the first development of germs, either animal or vegetable. Germination apparatus, an apparatus for malting grain.
Heir apparent
Apparent Ap*par"ent, a. [F. apparent, L. apparens, -entis, p. pr. of apparere. See Appear.] 1. Capable of being seen, or easily seen; open to view; visible to the eye; within sight or view. The moon . . . apparent queen. --Milton. 2. Clear or manifest to the understanding; plain; evident; obvious; known; palpable; indubitable. It is apparent foul play. --Shak. 3. Appearing to the eye or mind (distinguished from, but not necessarily opposed to, true or real); seeming; as the apparent motion or diameter of the sun. To live on terms of civility, and even of apparent friendship. --Macaulay. What Berkeley calls visible magnitude was by astronomers called apparent magnitude. --Reid. Apparent horizon, the circle which in a level plain bounds our view, and is formed by the apparent meeting of the earth and heavens, as distinguished from the rational horizon. Apparent time. See Time. Heir apparent (Law), one whose to an estate is indefeasible if he survives the ancestor; -- in distinction from presumptive heir. See Presumptive. Syn: Visible; distinct; plain; obvious; clear; certain; evident; manifest; indubitable; notorious.
Immovable apparatus
Immovable Im*mov"a*ble, a. 1. Incapable of being moved; firmly fixed; fast; -- used of material things; as, an immovable foundatin. Immovable, infixed, and frozen round. --Milton. 2. Steadfast; fixed; unalterable; unchangeable; -- used of the mind or will; as, an immovable purpose, or a man who remain immovable. 3. Not capable of being affected or moved in feeling or by sympathy; unimpressible; impassive. --Dryden. 4. (Law.) Not liable to be removed; permanent in place or tenure; fixed; as, an immovable estate. See Immovable, n. --Blackstone. Immovable apparatus (Med.), an appliance, like the plaster of paris bandage, which keeps fractured parts firmly in place. Immovable feasts (Eccl.), feasts which occur on a certain day of the year and do not depend on the date of Easter; as, Christmas, the Epiphany, etc.

Meaning of Appar from wikipedia

- Appar Tirunavukkarasar Nayanar (Tamil: திருநாவுக்கரசர், Tirunāvukkaracar, lit. "King of the Tongue, Lord of Language"), also known as Navukkarasar and...
- three most prominent Tamil poets of the 7th and 8th centuries: Sambandar, Appar, and Sundarar. The three poets were not only involved in portraying their...
- poets in Tamil Nadu. Nambi Andar Nambi compiled the first seven volumes by Appar, Sampandhar and Sundarar as Tevaram during the 12th century. During the...
- scholar of Tamil Nadu in South India who compiled the hymns of Sampantar, Appar and Sundarar and was himself one of the authors of the eleventh volume of...
- The temple is revered by the hymns of 7th century Tamil saivite poets, Appar, Sundarar and Sambandar and is cl****ified as Paadal Petra Sthalam. As per...
- The following is a Peterson translation of a Stotra by the Tamil poet Appar for Ardhanarishvara, the Hindu concept of a god who incorporates both the...
- called the Tirumurai. He arranged the hymns of three saint poets Sambandar, Appar and Sundarar as the first seven books which he called the Tevaram. He compiled...
- Sthalams, where the three of the most revered Nayanars (Saivite saints), Appar, Sundarar and Tirugnana Sambandar, have glorified the temple with their...
- Sambandar and Appar wrote of the temple in their poetic work, Tevaram. Sekkizhar, the author of the Periyapuranam wrote that both Appar and Sambandar...
- one of the shrines of the Vaippu Sthalams sung by Tamil Saivite Nayanar Appar. The shrine is revered as one of the 18 Maha Shakti Peetham. Shakti Peethas...
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