Definition of Allen. Meaning of Allen. Synonyms of Allen

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Definition of Allen

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Allenarly
Allenarly Al*len"ar*ly, adv. [All + anerly singly, fr. ane one.] Solely; only. [Scot.] --Sir W. Scott.
Befallen
Befall Be*fall", v. t. [imp. Befell; p. p. Befallen; p. pr. & vb. n. Befalling.] [AS. befeallan; pref. be- + feallan to fall.] To happen to. I beseech your grace that I may know The worst that may befall me. --Shak.
Challenge
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Challenge
Challenge Chal"lenge, v. i. To assert a right; to claim a place. Where nature doth with merit challenge. --Shak.
Challenge
Challenge Chal"lenge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Challenged; p. pr. & vb. n. Challenging.] [OE. chalengen to accuse, claim, OF. chalengier, chalongier, to claim, accuse, dispute, fr. L. calumniar to attack with false accusations. See Challenge, n., and cf. Calumniate.] 1. To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy. I challenge any man to make any pretense to power by right of fatherhood. --Locke. 2. To call, invite, or summon to answer for an offense by personal combat. By this I challenge him to single fight. --Shak. 3. To claim as due; to demand as a right. Challenge better terms. --Addison. 4. To censure; to blame. [Obs.] He complained of the emperors . . . and challenged them for that he had no greater revenues . . . from them. --Holland. 5. (Mil.) To question or demand the countersign from (one who attempts to pass the lines); as, the sentinel challenged us, with ``Who comes there?' 6. To take exception to; question; as, to challenge the accuracy of a statement or of a quotation. 7. (Law) To object to or take exception to, as to a juror, or member of a court. 8. To object to the reception of the vote of, as on the ground that the person in not qualified as a voter. [U. S.] To challenge to the array, favor, polls. See under Challenge, n.
Challenge to the array
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Challenge to the favor
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Challenge to the polls
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Challengeable
Challengeable Chal"lenge*a*ble, a. That may be challenged.
Challenged
Challenge Chal"lenge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Challenged; p. pr. & vb. n. Challenging.] [OE. chalengen to accuse, claim, OF. chalengier, chalongier, to claim, accuse, dispute, fr. L. calumniar to attack with false accusations. See Challenge, n., and cf. Calumniate.] 1. To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy. I challenge any man to make any pretense to power by right of fatherhood. --Locke. 2. To call, invite, or summon to answer for an offense by personal combat. By this I challenge him to single fight. --Shak. 3. To claim as due; to demand as a right. Challenge better terms. --Addison. 4. To censure; to blame. [Obs.] He complained of the emperors . . . and challenged them for that he had no greater revenues . . . from them. --Holland. 5. (Mil.) To question or demand the countersign from (one who attempts to pass the lines); as, the sentinel challenged us, with ``Who comes there?' 6. To take exception to; question; as, to challenge the accuracy of a statement or of a quotation. 7. (Law) To object to or take exception to, as to a juror, or member of a court. 8. To object to the reception of the vote of, as on the ground that the person in not qualified as a voter. [U. S.] To challenge to the array, favor, polls. See under Challenge, n.
Challenger
Challenger Chal"len*ger, n. One who challenges.
Challenging
Challenge Chal"lenge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Challenged; p. pr. & vb. n. Challenging.] [OE. chalengen to accuse, claim, OF. chalengier, chalongier, to claim, accuse, dispute, fr. L. calumniar to attack with false accusations. See Challenge, n., and cf. Calumniate.] 1. To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy. I challenge any man to make any pretense to power by right of fatherhood. --Locke. 2. To call, invite, or summon to answer for an offense by personal combat. By this I challenge him to single fight. --Shak. 3. To claim as due; to demand as a right. Challenge better terms. --Addison. 4. To censure; to blame. [Obs.] He complained of the emperors . . . and challenged them for that he had no greater revenues . . . from them. --Holland. 5. (Mil.) To question or demand the countersign from (one who attempts to pass the lines); as, the sentinel challenged us, with ``Who comes there?' 6. To take exception to; question; as, to challenge the accuracy of a statement or of a quotation. 7. (Law) To object to or take exception to, as to a juror, or member of a court. 8. To object to the reception of the vote of, as on the ground that the person in not qualified as a voter. [U. S.] To challenge to the array, favor, polls. See under Challenge, n.
Chapfallen
Chapfallen Chap"fall`en, a. Having the lower chap or jaw drooping, -- an indication of humiliation and dejection; crestfallen; discouraged. See Chopfallen.
Chopfallen
Chopfallen Chop`fall`en, a. Having the lower chop or jaw depressed; hence, crestfallen; dejected; dispirited; downcast. See Chapfallen.
Downfallen
Downfallen Down"fall`en, a. Fallen; ruined. --Carew.
Fallen
Fallen Fall"en, a. Dropped; prostrate; degraded; ruined; decreased; dead. Some ruined temple or fallen monument. --Rogers.
Fallency
Fallency Fal"len*cy, n. [LL. fallentia, L. fallens p. pr of fallere.] An exception. [Obs.] --Jer. Taylor.
Jaw-fallen
Jaw-fallen Jaw"-fall`en, a. Dejected; chopfallen.
mallenders
Malanders Mal"an*ders, n. pl. [F. malandres, fr. L. malandria blisters or pustules on the neck, especially in horses.] (Far.) A scurfy eruption in the bend of the knee of the fore leg of a horse. See Sallenders. [Written also mallenders.]
Mallenders
Mallenders Mal"len*ders, n. pl. (Far.) Same as Malanders.
Misfallen
Misfall Mis*fall", v. t. [imp. Misfell; p. p. Misfallen; p. pr. & vb. n. Misfalling.] To befall, as ill luck; to happen to unluckily. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Peremptory challenge
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Principal challenge
Principal Prin"ci*pal, a. [F., from L. principalis. See Prince.] 1. Highest in rank, authority, character, importance, or degree; most considerable or important; chief; main; as, the principal officers of a Government; the principal men of a state; the principal productions of a country; the principal arguments in a case. Wisdom is the principal thing. --Prov. iv. 7. 2. Of or pertaining to a prince; princely. [A Latinism] [Obs.] --Spenser. Principal axis. See Axis of a curve, under Axis. Principal axes of a quadric (Geom.), three lines in which the principal planes of the solid intersect two and two, as in an ellipsoid. Principal challenge. (Law) See under Challenge. Principal plane. See Plane of projection (a), under Plane. Principal of a quadric (Geom.), three planes each of which is at right angles to the other two, and bisects all chords of the quadric perpendicular to the plane, as in an ellipsoid. Principal point (Persp.), the projection of the point of sight upon the plane of projection. Principal ray (Persp.), the line drawn through the point of sight perpendicular to the perspective plane. Principal section (Crystallog.), a plane passing through the optical axis of a crystal.
Principal challenge
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Rallentando
Rallentando Ral"len*tan"do, a. [It.] (Mus.) Slackening; -- a direction to perform a passage with a gradual decrease in time and force; ritardando.
Sallenders
Sallenders Sal"len*ders, n. pl. [F. solandres, solandre.] (Far.) An eruption on the hind leg of a horse. [Written also sellanders, and sellenders.] On the inside of the hock, or a little below it, as well as at the bend of the knee, there is occasionally a scurfy eruption called ``mallenders' in the fore leg, and ``sallenders' in the hind leg. --Youatt.
Thallene
Thallene Thal"lene, n. (Chem.) A hydrocarbon obtained from coal-tar residues, and remarkable for its intense yellowish green fluorescence.
To challenge the array
Array Ar*ray", n. [OE. arai, arrai, OF. arrai, arrei, arroi, order, arrangement, dress, F. arroi; a (L. ad) + OF. rai, rei, roi, order, arrangement, fr. G. or Scand.; cf. Goth. raidjan, garaidjan, to arrange, MHG. gereiten, Icel. rei[eth]i rigging, harness; akin to E. ready. Cf. Ready, Greith, Curry.] 1. Order; a regular and imposing arrangement; disposition in regular lines; hence, order of battle; as, drawn up in battle array. Wedged together in the closest array. --Gibbon. 2. The whole body of persons thus placed in order; an orderly collection; hence, a body of soldiers. A gallant array of nobles and cavaliers. --Prescott. 3. An imposing series of things. Their long array of sapphire and of gold. --Byron. 4. Dress; garments disposed in order upon the person; rich or beautiful apparel. --Dryden. 5. (Law) (a) A ranking or setting forth in order, by the proper officer, of a jury as impaneled in a cause. (b) The panel itself. (c) The whole body of jurors summoned to attend the court. To challenge the array (Law), to except to the whole panel. --Cowell. --Tomlins. --Blount. Commission of array (Eng. Hist.), a commission given by the prince to officers in every county, to muster and array the inhabitants, or see them in a condition for war. --Blackstone.
To challenge to the
Challenge Chal"lenge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Challenged; p. pr. & vb. n. Challenging.] [OE. chalengen to accuse, claim, OF. chalengier, chalongier, to claim, accuse, dispute, fr. L. calumniar to attack with false accusations. See Challenge, n., and cf. Calumniate.] 1. To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy. I challenge any man to make any pretense to power by right of fatherhood. --Locke. 2. To call, invite, or summon to answer for an offense by personal combat. By this I challenge him to single fight. --Shak. 3. To claim as due; to demand as a right. Challenge better terms. --Addison. 4. To censure; to blame. [Obs.] He complained of the emperors . . . and challenged them for that he had no greater revenues . . . from them. --Holland. 5. (Mil.) To question or demand the countersign from (one who attempts to pass the lines); as, the sentinel challenged us, with ``Who comes there?' 6. To take exception to; question; as, to challenge the accuracy of a statement or of a quotation. 7. (Law) To object to or take exception to, as to a juror, or member of a court. 8. To object to the reception of the vote of, as on the ground that the person in not qualified as a voter. [U. S.] To challenge to the array, favor, polls. See under Challenge, n.
Windfallen
Windfallen Wind"fall`en, a. Blown down by the wind.

Meaning of Allen from wikipedia

- Allen, Allen's or Allens may refer to: Allen (surname), a list of people Allen (given name), a list of people and fictional characters Allen, County Kildare...
- Heywood "Woody" Allen (born Allan Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is an American director, writer, actor, and comedian whose career spans more than...
- Paul Gardner Allen (January 21, 1953 – October 15, 2018) was an American business magnate, investor, researcher, humanitarian, and philanthropist. He...
- Asa Alonso Allen (March 27, 1911 – June 11, 1970), better known as A. A. Allen, was a minister with a Pentecostal evangelistic healing and deliverance...
- Allen, Allen, Allen & Allen is a United States law firm based in Richmond, Virginia. Founded in 1910 in Lunenburg County, Virginia the firm now has 32...
- Timothy Alan **** (born June 13, 1953), known professionally as Tim Allen, is an American actor and comedian. He is known for playing Tim "The Toolman"...
- Kyle Allen (born March 8, 1996) is an American football quarterback for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). He pla**** college...
- Will Allen may refer to: Will Allen (safety) (born 1982), American football safety for the Pittsburgh Steelers Will Allen (cornerback) (born 1978), American...
- Cooper (née Allen; 2 May 1985) is an English singer and songwriter. She is the daughter of actor Keith Allen and film producer Alison Owen. Allen left school...
- Ethan Allen (January 21, 1738 [O.S. January 10, 1737] – February 12, 1789) was a farmer, businessman, land speculator, philosopher, writer, lay theologian...
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