Definition of Acker. Meaning of Acker. Synonyms of Acker

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Definition of Acker

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Atka mackerel
Yellowfish Yel"low*fish`, n. (Zo["o]l.) A rock trout (Pleurogrammus monopterygius) found on the coast of Alaska; -- called also striped fish, and Atka mackerel.
Attacker
Attacker At*tack"er, n. One who attacks.
Backer
Backer Back"er, n. One who, or that which, backs; especially one who backs a person or thing in a contest.
big-eye mackerel
Chub Chub, n. [This word seems to signify a large or thick fish. Cf. Sw. kubb a short and thick piece of wood, and perh. F. chabot chub.] (Zo["o]l.) A species to fresh-water fish of the Cyprinid[ae] or Carp family. The common European species is Leuciscus cephalus; the cheven. In America the name is applied to various fishes of the same family, of the genera Semotilus, Squalius, Ceratichthys, etc., and locally to several very different fishes, as the tautog, black bass, etc. Chub mackerel (Zo["o]l.), a species of mackerel (Scomber colias) in some years found in abundance on the Atlantic coast, but absent in others; -- called also bull mackerel, thimble-eye, and big-eye mackerel. Chub sucker (Zo["o]l.), a fresh-water fish of the United States (Erimyzon sucetta); -- called also creekfish.
big-eyed mackerel
Spanish Span"ish, a. Of or pertaining to Spain or the Spaniards. Spanish bayonet (Bot.), a liliaceous plant (Yucca alorifolia) with rigid spine-tipped leaves. The name is also applied to other similar plants of the Southwestern United States and mexico. Called also Spanish daggers. Spanish bean (Bot.) See the Note under Bean. Spanish black, a black pigment obtained by charring cork. --Ure. Spanish broom (Bot.), a leguminous shrub (Spartium junceum) having many green flexible rushlike twigs. Spanish brown, a species of earth used in painting, having a dark reddish brown color, due to the presence of sesquioxide of iron. Spanish buckeye (Bot.), a small tree (Ungnadia speciosa) of Texas, New Mexico, etc., related to the buckeye, but having pinnate leaves and a three-seeded fruit. Spanish burton (Naut.), a purchase composed of two single blocks. A double Spanish burton has one double and two single blocks. --Luce (Textbook of Seamanship). Spanish chalk (Min.), a kind of steatite; -- so called because obtained from Aragon in Spain. Spanish cress (Bot.), a cruciferous plant (lepidium Cadamines), a species of peppergrass. Spanish curiew (Zo["o]l.), the long-billed curlew. [U.S.] Spanish daggers (Bot.) See Spanish bayonet. Spanish elm (Bot.), a large West Indian tree (Cordia Gerascanthus) furnishing hard and useful timber. Spanish feretto, a rich reddish brown pigment obtained by calcining copper and sulphur together in closed crucibles. Spanish flag (Zo["o]l.), the California rockfish (Sebastichthys rubrivinctus). It is conspicuously colored with bands of red and white. Spanish fly (Zo["o]l.), a brilliant green beetle, common in the south of Europe, used for raising blisters. See Blister beetle under Blister, and Cantharis. Spanish fox (Naut.), a yarn twisted against its lay. Spanish grass. (Bot.) See Esparto. Spanish juice (Bot.), licorice. Spanish leather. See Cordwain. Spanish mackerel. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A species of mackerel (Scomber colias) found both in Europe and America. In America called chub mackerel, big-eyed mackerel, and bull mackerel. (b) In the United States, a handsome mackerel having bright yellow round spots (Scomberomorus maculatus), highly esteemed as a food fish. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to other species. See Illust. under Mackerel. Spanish main, the name formerly given to the southern portion of the Caribbean Sea, together with the contiguous coast, embracing the route traversed by Spanish treasure ships from the New to the Old World. Spanish moss. (Bot.) See Tillandsia. Spanish needles (Bot.), a composite weed (Bidens bipinnata) having achenia armed with needlelike awns. Spanish nut (Bot.), a bulbous plant (Iris Sisyrinchium) of the south of Europe. Spanish potato (Bot.), the sweet potato. See under Potato. Spanish red, an ocherous red pigment resembling Venetian red, but slightly yellower and warmer. --Fairholt. Spanish reef (Naut.), a knot tied in the head of a jib-headed sail. Spanish sheep (Zo["o]l.), a merino. Spanish white, an impalpable powder prepared from chalk by pulverizing and repeated washings, -- used as a white pigment. Spanish windlass (Naut.), a wooden roller, with a rope wound about it, into which a marline spike is thrust to serve as a lever.
bull mackerel
Spanish Span"ish, a. Of or pertaining to Spain or the Spaniards. Spanish bayonet (Bot.), a liliaceous plant (Yucca alorifolia) with rigid spine-tipped leaves. The name is also applied to other similar plants of the Southwestern United States and mexico. Called also Spanish daggers. Spanish bean (Bot.) See the Note under Bean. Spanish black, a black pigment obtained by charring cork. --Ure. Spanish broom (Bot.), a leguminous shrub (Spartium junceum) having many green flexible rushlike twigs. Spanish brown, a species of earth used in painting, having a dark reddish brown color, due to the presence of sesquioxide of iron. Spanish buckeye (Bot.), a small tree (Ungnadia speciosa) of Texas, New Mexico, etc., related to the buckeye, but having pinnate leaves and a three-seeded fruit. Spanish burton (Naut.), a purchase composed of two single blocks. A double Spanish burton has one double and two single blocks. --Luce (Textbook of Seamanship). Spanish chalk (Min.), a kind of steatite; -- so called because obtained from Aragon in Spain. Spanish cress (Bot.), a cruciferous plant (lepidium Cadamines), a species of peppergrass. Spanish curiew (Zo["o]l.), the long-billed curlew. [U.S.] Spanish daggers (Bot.) See Spanish bayonet. Spanish elm (Bot.), a large West Indian tree (Cordia Gerascanthus) furnishing hard and useful timber. Spanish feretto, a rich reddish brown pigment obtained by calcining copper and sulphur together in closed crucibles. Spanish flag (Zo["o]l.), the California rockfish (Sebastichthys rubrivinctus). It is conspicuously colored with bands of red and white. Spanish fly (Zo["o]l.), a brilliant green beetle, common in the south of Europe, used for raising blisters. See Blister beetle under Blister, and Cantharis. Spanish fox (Naut.), a yarn twisted against its lay. Spanish grass. (Bot.) See Esparto. Spanish juice (Bot.), licorice. Spanish leather. See Cordwain. Spanish mackerel. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A species of mackerel (Scomber colias) found both in Europe and America. In America called chub mackerel, big-eyed mackerel, and bull mackerel. (b) In the United States, a handsome mackerel having bright yellow round spots (Scomberomorus maculatus), highly esteemed as a food fish. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to other species. See Illust. under Mackerel. Spanish main, the name formerly given to the southern portion of the Caribbean Sea, together with the contiguous coast, embracing the route traversed by Spanish treasure ships from the New to the Old World. Spanish moss. (Bot.) See Tillandsia. Spanish needles (Bot.), a composite weed (Bidens bipinnata) having achenia armed with needlelike awns. Spanish nut (Bot.), a bulbous plant (Iris Sisyrinchium) of the south of Europe. Spanish potato (Bot.), the sweet potato. See under Potato. Spanish red, an ocherous red pigment resembling Venetian red, but slightly yellower and warmer. --Fairholt. Spanish reef (Naut.), a knot tied in the head of a jib-headed sail. Spanish sheep (Zo["o]l.), a merino. Spanish white, an impalpable powder prepared from chalk by pulverizing and repeated washings, -- used as a white pigment. Spanish windlass (Naut.), a wooden roller, with a rope wound about it, into which a marline spike is thrust to serve as a lever.
Bull mackerel
Bull Bull, a. Of or pertaining to a bull; resembling a bull; male; large; fierce. Bull bat (Zo["o]l.), the night hawk; -- so called from the loud noise it makes while feeding on the wing, in the evening. Bull calf. (a) A stupid fellow. Bull mackerel (Zo["o]l.), the chub mackerel. Bull pump (Mining), a direct single-acting pumping engine, in which the steam cylinder is placed above the pump. Bull snake (Zo["o]l.), the pine snake of the United States. Bull stag, a castrated bull. See Stag. Bull wheel, a wheel, or drum, on which a rope is wound for lifting heavy articles, as logs, the tools in well boring, etc.
bull mackerel
Chub Chub, n. [This word seems to signify a large or thick fish. Cf. Sw. kubb a short and thick piece of wood, and perh. F. chabot chub.] (Zo["o]l.) A species to fresh-water fish of the Cyprinid[ae] or Carp family. The common European species is Leuciscus cephalus; the cheven. In America the name is applied to various fishes of the same family, of the genera Semotilus, Squalius, Ceratichthys, etc., and locally to several very different fishes, as the tautog, black bass, etc. Chub mackerel (Zo["o]l.), a species of mackerel (Scomber colias) in some years found in abundance on the Atlantic coast, but absent in others; -- called also bull mackerel, thimble-eye, and big-eye mackerel. Chub sucker (Zo["o]l.), a fresh-water fish of the United States (Erimyzon sucetta); -- called also creekfish.
Bushwhacker
Bushwhacker Bush"whack`er, n. 1. One accustomed to beat about, or travel through, bushes. [U.S.] They were gallant bushwhackers, and hunters of raccoons by moonlight. --W. Irving. 2. A guerrilla; a marauding assassin; one who pretends to be a peaceful citizen, but secretly harasses a hostile force or its sympathizers. [U.S.] --Farrow.
Cackerel
Cackerel Cack"er*el, n. [OF. caquerel cagarel (Cotgr.), from the root of E. cack.] (Zo["o]l.) The mendole; a small worthless Mediterranean fish considered poisonous by the ancients. See Mendole.
Cannon cracker
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
chub mackerel
Spanish Span"ish, a. Of or pertaining to Spain or the Spaniards. Spanish bayonet (Bot.), a liliaceous plant (Yucca alorifolia) with rigid spine-tipped leaves. The name is also applied to other similar plants of the Southwestern United States and mexico. Called also Spanish daggers. Spanish bean (Bot.) See the Note under Bean. Spanish black, a black pigment obtained by charring cork. --Ure. Spanish broom (Bot.), a leguminous shrub (Spartium junceum) having many green flexible rushlike twigs. Spanish brown, a species of earth used in painting, having a dark reddish brown color, due to the presence of sesquioxide of iron. Spanish buckeye (Bot.), a small tree (Ungnadia speciosa) of Texas, New Mexico, etc., related to the buckeye, but having pinnate leaves and a three-seeded fruit. Spanish burton (Naut.), a purchase composed of two single blocks. A double Spanish burton has one double and two single blocks. --Luce (Textbook of Seamanship). Spanish chalk (Min.), a kind of steatite; -- so called because obtained from Aragon in Spain. Spanish cress (Bot.), a cruciferous plant (lepidium Cadamines), a species of peppergrass. Spanish curiew (Zo["o]l.), the long-billed curlew. [U.S.] Spanish daggers (Bot.) See Spanish bayonet. Spanish elm (Bot.), a large West Indian tree (Cordia Gerascanthus) furnishing hard and useful timber. Spanish feretto, a rich reddish brown pigment obtained by calcining copper and sulphur together in closed crucibles. Spanish flag (Zo["o]l.), the California rockfish (Sebastichthys rubrivinctus). It is conspicuously colored with bands of red and white. Spanish fly (Zo["o]l.), a brilliant green beetle, common in the south of Europe, used for raising blisters. See Blister beetle under Blister, and Cantharis. Spanish fox (Naut.), a yarn twisted against its lay. Spanish grass. (Bot.) See Esparto. Spanish juice (Bot.), licorice. Spanish leather. See Cordwain. Spanish mackerel. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A species of mackerel (Scomber colias) found both in Europe and America. In America called chub mackerel, big-eyed mackerel, and bull mackerel. (b) In the United States, a handsome mackerel having bright yellow round spots (Scomberomorus maculatus), highly esteemed as a food fish. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to other species. See Illust. under Mackerel. Spanish main, the name formerly given to the southern portion of the Caribbean Sea, together with the contiguous coast, embracing the route traversed by Spanish treasure ships from the New to the Old World. Spanish moss. (Bot.) See Tillandsia. Spanish needles (Bot.), a composite weed (Bidens bipinnata) having achenia armed with needlelike awns. Spanish nut (Bot.), a bulbous plant (Iris Sisyrinchium) of the south of Europe. Spanish potato (Bot.), the sweet potato. See under Potato. Spanish red, an ocherous red pigment resembling Venetian red, but slightly yellower and warmer. --Fairholt. Spanish reef (Naut.), a knot tied in the head of a jib-headed sail. Spanish sheep (Zo["o]l.), a merino. Spanish white, an impalpable powder prepared from chalk by pulverizing and repeated washings, -- used as a white pigment. Spanish windlass (Naut.), a wooden roller, with a rope wound about it, into which a marline spike is thrust to serve as a lever.
Chub mackerel
Chub Chub, n. [This word seems to signify a large or thick fish. Cf. Sw. kubb a short and thick piece of wood, and perh. F. chabot chub.] (Zo["o]l.) A species to fresh-water fish of the Cyprinid[ae] or Carp family. The common European species is Leuciscus cephalus; the cheven. In America the name is applied to various fishes of the same family, of the genera Semotilus, Squalius, Ceratichthys, etc., and locally to several very different fishes, as the tautog, black bass, etc. Chub mackerel (Zo["o]l.), a species of mackerel (Scomber colias) in some years found in abundance on the Atlantic coast, but absent in others; -- called also bull mackerel, thimble-eye, and big-eye mackerel. Chub sucker (Zo["o]l.), a fresh-water fish of the United States (Erimyzon sucetta); -- called also creekfish.
Clacker
Clacker Clack"er, n. 1. One who clacks; that which clacks; especially, the clapper of a mill. 2. A claqueur. See Claqueur.
Cracker
Cracker Crack"er (kr[a^]k"[~e]r), n. 1. One who, or that which, cracks. 2. A noisy boaster; a swaggering fellow. [Obs.] What cracker is this same that deafs our ears? --Shak. 3. A small firework, consisting of a little powder inclosed in a thick paper cylinder with a fuse, and exploding with a sharp noise; -- often called firecracker. 4. A thin, dry biscuit, often hard or crisp; as, a Boston cracker; a Graham cracker; a soda cracker; an oyster cracker. 5. A nickname to designate a poor white in some parts of the Southern United States. --Bartlett. 6. (Zo["o]l.) The pintail duck. 7. pl. (Mach.) A pair of fluted rolls for grinding caoutchouc. --Knight.
Cracker State
Cracker State Cracker State Georgia; -- a nickname. See Cracker, n. 5.
Firecracker
Firecracker Fire"crack`er, n. See Cracker., n., 3.
firecracker
Cracker Crack"er (kr[a^]k"[~e]r), n. 1. One who, or that which, cracks. 2. A noisy boaster; a swaggering fellow. [Obs.] What cracker is this same that deafs our ears? --Shak. 3. A small firework, consisting of a little powder inclosed in a thick paper cylinder with a fuse, and exploding with a sharp noise; -- often called firecracker. 4. A thin, dry biscuit, often hard or crisp; as, a Boston cracker; a Graham cracker; a soda cracker; an oyster cracker. 5. A nickname to designate a poor white in some parts of the Southern United States. --Bartlett. 6. (Zo["o]l.) The pintail duck. 7. pl. (Mach.) A pair of fluted rolls for grinding caoutchouc. --Knight.
Flacker
Flacker Flack"er, v. i. [OE. flakeren, fr. flacken to move quickly to and fro; cf. icel. flakka to rove about, AS. flacor fluttering, flying, G. flackern to flare, flicker.] To flutter, as a bird. [Prov. Eng.] --Grose.
Greenbacker
Greenbacker Green"back"er, n. One of those who supported greenback or paper money, and opposed the resumption of specie payments. [Colloq. U. S.]
Hacker
Hacker Hack"er, n. One who, or that which, hacks. Specifically: A cutting instrument for making notches; esp., one used for notching pine trees in collecting turpentine; a hack.
Hackery
Hackery Hack"er*y, n. [Hind. chakr[=a].] A cart with wooden wheels, drawn by bullocks. [Bengal] --Malcom.
horse mackerel
Saurel Sau"rel, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any carangoid fish of the genus Trachurus, especially T. trachurus, or T. saurus, of Europe and America, and T. picturatus of California. Called also skipjack, and horse mackerel.
horse mackerel
Tunny Tun"ny (t[u^]n"n[y^]), n.; pl. Tunnies. [L. thunnus, thynnus, Gr. qy`nnos, qy^nos: cf. It. tonno, F. & Pr. thon.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of large oceanic fishes belonging to the Mackerel family, especially the common or great tunny (Orcynus or Albacora thynnus) native of the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. It sometimes weighs a thousand pounds or more, and is extensively caught in the Mediterranean. On the American coast it is called horse mackerel. See Illust. of Horse mackerel, under Horse. [Written also thynny.] Note: The little tunny (Gymnosarda alletterata) of the Mediterranean and North Atlantic, and the long-finned tunny, or albicore (see Albicore), are related species of smaller size.
horse mackerel
Albicore Al"bi*core, n. [F. albicore (cf. Sp. albacora, Pg. albacor, albacora, albecora), fr. Ar. bakr, bekr, a young camel, young cow, heifer, and the article al: cf. Pg. bacoro a little pig.] (Zo["o]l.) A name applied to several large fishes of the Mackerel family, esp. Orcynus alalonga. One species (Orcynus thynnus), common in the Mediterranean and Atlantic, is called in New England the horse mackerel; the tunny. [Written also albacore.]
horse mackerel
Bluefish Blue"fish`, n. (Zo["o]l.) 1. A large voracious fish (Pomatomus saitatrix), of the family Carangid[ae], valued as a food fish, and widely distributed on the American coast. On the New Jersey and Rhode Island coast it is called the horse mackerel, in Virginia saltwater tailor, or skipjack. 2. A West Indian fish (Platyglossus radiatus), of the family Labrid[ae]. Note: The name is applied locally to other species of fishes; as the cunner, sea bass, squeteague, etc.
Jackeroo
Jackaroo Jack`a*roo", n. Also Jackeroo Jack`e*roo" [Jack + kangaroo.] A young man living as an apprentice on a sheep station, or otherwise engaged in acquainting himself with colonial life. [Colloq., Australia]
Knacker
Knacker Knack"er, n. 1. One who makes knickknacks, toys, etc. --Mortimer. 2. One of two or more pieces of bone or wood held loosely between the fingers, and struck together by moving the hand; -- called also clapper. --Halliwell.
Knickknackery
Knickknackery Knick"knack`er*y, n. Knickknacks.
Lacker
Lacker Lack"er, n. One who lacks or is in want.

Meaning of Acker from wikipedia

- Acker (born 1983), American basketball player Amy Acker (born 1976), American actress Bill Acker (born 1956), American football player Dieter Acker (1940–2006)...
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- Kathy Acker (April 18, 1947 – November 30, 1997) was an American experimental novelist, punk poet, playwright, essayist, postmodernist and ****-positive...
- Bernard Stanley "Acker" Bilk, MBE (28 January 1929 – 2 November 2014) was an English clarinettist and vocalist known for his breathy, vibrato-rich, lower-register...
- Jean Acker (born Harriet Ackers, October 23, 1893 – August 16, 1978) was an American film actress with a career dating from the silent film era through...
- Drew Van Acker (born April 2, 1986) is an American actor. He is best known for playing Jason DiLaurentis, the older brother of Alison DiLaurentis (Sasha...
- computer-animated post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by Shane Acker, written by Pamela Pettler, and produced by Jim Lemley, Tim Burton, Timur...
- Kenneth Acker (born February 6, 1992) is an American football cornerback who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the...
- Sharon Acker (born April 2, 1935) is a Canadian film, stage, and television actress and model. Acker appeared mostly on television in Canada and the United...
- Ackerly may refer to: Ackerly, Texas Ackerly field, Nantucket airport Ackerly (surname)...
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