Definition of ful. Meaning of ful. Synonyms of ful

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Definition of ful

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Ailurus fulgens
Panda Pan"da, n. (Zo["o]l.) A small Asiatic mammal (Ailurus fulgens) having fine soft fur. It is related to the bears, and inhabits the mountains of Northern India.
At full
Full Full, a. [Compar. Fuller; superl. Fullest.] [OE. & AS. ful; akin to OS. ful, D. vol, OHG. fol, G. voll, Icel. fullr, Sw. full, Dan. fuld, Goth. fulls, L. plenus, Gr. ?, Skr. p?rna full, pr? to fill, also to Gr. ? much, E. poly-, pref., G. viel, AS. fela. [root]80. Cf. Complete, Fill, Plenary, Plenty.] 1. Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; -- said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people. Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular. --Blackstone. 2. Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in. quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate; as, a full meal; a full supply; a full voice; a full compensation; a house full of furniture. 3. Not wanting in any essential quality; complete, entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon. It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharaoh dreamed. --Gen. xii. 1. The man commands Like a full soldier. --Shak. I can not Request a fuller satisfaction Than you have freely granted. --Ford. 4. Sated; surfeited. I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. --Is. i. 11. 5. Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information. Reading maketh a full man. --Bacon. 6. Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it, as, to be full of some project. Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions. --Locke. 7. Filled with emotions. The heart is so full that a drop overfills it. --Lowell. 8. Impregnated; made pregnant. [Obs.] Ilia, the fair, . . . full of Mars. --Dryden. At full, when full or complete. --Shak. Full age (Law) the age at which one attains full personal rights; majority; -- in England and the United States the age of 21 years. --Abbott. Full and by (Naut.), sailing closehauled, having all the sails full, and lying as near the wind as poesible. Full band (Mus.), a band in which all the instruments are employed. Full binding, the binding of a book when made wholly of leather, as distinguished from half binding. Full bottom, a kind of wig full and large at the bottom. Full brother or sister, a brother or sister having the same parents as another. Full cry (Hunting), eager chase; -- said of hounds that have caught the scent, and give tongue together. Full dress, the dress prescribed by authority or by etiquette to be worn on occasions of ceremony. Full hand (Poker), three of a kind and a pair. Full moon. (a) The moon with its whole disk illuminated, as when opposite to the sun. (b) The time when the moon is full. Full organ (Mus.), the organ when all or most stops are out. Full score (Mus.), a score in which all the parts for voices and instruments are given. Full sea, high water. Full swing, free course; unrestrained liberty; ``Leaving corrupt nature to . . . the full swing and freedom of its own extravagant actings.' South (Colloq.) In full, at length; uncontracted; unabridged; written out in words, and not indicated by figures. In full blast. See under Blast.
At full cock
Cock Cock, n. [It. cocca notch of an arrow.] 1. The notch of an arrow or crossbow. 2. The hammer in the lock of a firearm. At cock, At full cock, with the hammer raised and ready to fire; -- said of firearms, also, jocularly, of one prepared for instant action. At half cock. See under Half. Cock feather (Archery), the feather of an arrow at right angles to the direction of the cock or notch. --Nares.
Aurum fulminans
Aurum Au"rum, n. [L.] Gold. Aurum fulminans (?). See Fulminate. Aurum mosaicum (?). See Mosaic.
aurum fulminans
Fulminate Ful"mi*nate, n. [Cf. P. fulminate. See Fulminate, v. i.] (Chem.) (a) A salt of fulminic acid. See under Fulminic. (b) A fulminating powder. Fulminate of gold, an explosive compound of gold; -- called also fulminating gold, and aurum fulminans.
Aythya or Fuligula cristata
Poachard Poach"ard, n. [From Poach to stab.] [Written also pocard, pochard.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) A common European duck (Aythya ferina); -- called also goldhead, poker, and fresh-water, or red-headed, widgeon. (b) The American redhead, which is closely allied to the European poachard. Red-crested poachard (Zo["o]l.), an Old World duck (Branta rufina). Scaup poachard, the scaup duck. Tufted poachard, a scaup duck (Aythya, or Fuligula cristata), native of Europe and Asia.
Aythya or Fuligula marila
Broadbill Broad"bill`, n. 1. (Zo["o]l.) A wild duck (Aythya, or Fuligula, marila), which appears in large numbers on the eastern coast of the United States, in autumn; -- called also bluebill, blackhead, raft duck, and scaup duck. See Scaup duck. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The shoveler. See Shoveler.
C fuliginosus
Mamgabey Mam"ga*bey, n. [So called by Buffon from Mangaby, in Madagascar, where he erroneously supposed them be native.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several African monkeys of the genus Cercocebus, as the sooty mangabey (C. fuliginosus), which is sooty black. [Also written mangaby.]
Elaps fulvius
Beadsnake Bead"snake`, n. (Zo["o]l.) A small poisonous snake of North America (Elaps fulvius), banded with yellow, red, and black.
Elaps fulvius
Harlequin Har"le*quin, n. [F. arlequin,formerly written also harlequin (cf. It, arlecchino), prob. fr. OF. hierlekin, hellequin, goblin, elf, which is prob. of German or Dutch origin; cf. D. hel hell. Cf. Hell, Kin.] A buffoon, dressed in party-colored clothes, who plays tricks, often without speaking, to divert the bystanders or an audience; a merry-andrew; originally, a droll rogue of Italian comedy. --Percy Smith. As dumb harlequin is exhibited in our theaters. --Johnson. Harlequin bat (Zo["o]l.), an Indian bat (Scotophilus ornatus), curiously variegated with white spots. Harlequin beetle (Zo["o]l.), a very large South American beetle (Acrocinus longimanus) having very long legs and antenn[ae]. The elytra are curiously marked with red, black, and gray. Harlequin cabbage bug. (Zo["o]l.) See Calicoback. Harlequin caterpillar. (Zo["o]l.), the larva of an American bombycid moth (Euch[ae]tes egle) which is covered with black, white, yellow, and orange tufts of hair. Harlequin duck (Zo["o]l.), a North American duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). The male is dark ash, curiously streaked with white. Harlequin moth. (Zo["o]l.) See Magpie Moth. Harlequin opal. See Opal. Harlequin snake (Zo["o]l.), a small, poisonous snake (Elaps fulvius), ringed with red and black, found in the Southern United States.
Formica fuliginosa
Jet Jet, n. [OF. jet, jayet, F. ja["i]et, jais, L. gagates, fr. Gr. ?; -- so called from ? or ?, a town and river in Lycia.] [written also jeat, jayet.] (Min.) A variety of lignite, of a very compact texture and velvet black color, susceptible of a good polish, and often wrought into mourning jewelry, toys, buttons, etc. Formerly called also black amber. Jet ant (Zo["o]l.), a blackish European ant (Formica fuliginosa), which builds its nest of a paperlike material in the trunks of trees.
Gyps fulvus
Griffin Grif"fin, Griffon Grif"fon, n. [OE. griffin, griffon, griffoun, F. griffon, fr. L. gryphus, equiv to gryps, Gr. ?; -- so called because of the hooked beak, and akin to grypo`s curved, hook-nosed.] 1. (Myth.) A fabulous monster, half lion and half eagle. It is often represented in Grecian and Roman works of art. 2. (Her.) A representation of this creature as an heraldic charge. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A species of large vulture (Gyps fulvus) found in the mountainous parts of Southern Europe, North Africa, and Asia Minor; -- called also gripe, and grype. It is supposed to be the ``eagle' of the Bible. The bearded griffin is the lammergeir. [Written also gryphon.] 4. An English early apple.
heliornis fulica
Finfoot Fin"foot`, n. (Zo["o]l.) A South American bird (heliornis fulica) allied to the grebes. The name is also applied to several related species of the genus Podica.
In full
Full Full, a. [Compar. Fuller; superl. Fullest.] [OE. & AS. ful; akin to OS. ful, D. vol, OHG. fol, G. voll, Icel. fullr, Sw. full, Dan. fuld, Goth. fulls, L. plenus, Gr. ?, Skr. p?rna full, pr? to fill, also to Gr. ? much, E. poly-, pref., G. viel, AS. fela. [root]80. Cf. Complete, Fill, Plenary, Plenty.] 1. Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; -- said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people. Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular. --Blackstone. 2. Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in. quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate; as, a full meal; a full supply; a full voice; a full compensation; a house full of furniture. 3. Not wanting in any essential quality; complete, entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon. It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharaoh dreamed. --Gen. xii. 1. The man commands Like a full soldier. --Shak. I can not Request a fuller satisfaction Than you have freely granted. --Ford. 4. Sated; surfeited. I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. --Is. i. 11. 5. Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information. Reading maketh a full man. --Bacon. 6. Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it, as, to be full of some project. Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions. --Locke. 7. Filled with emotions. The heart is so full that a drop overfills it. --Lowell. 8. Impregnated; made pregnant. [Obs.] Ilia, the fair, . . . full of Mars. --Dryden. At full, when full or complete. --Shak. Full age (Law) the age at which one attains full personal rights; majority; -- in England and the United States the age of 21 years. --Abbott. Full and by (Naut.), sailing closehauled, having all the sails full, and lying as near the wind as poesible. Full band (Mus.), a band in which all the instruments are employed. Full binding, the binding of a book when made wholly of leather, as distinguished from half binding. Full bottom, a kind of wig full and large at the bottom. Full brother or sister, a brother or sister having the same parents as another. Full cry (Hunting), eager chase; -- said of hounds that have caught the scent, and give tongue together. Full dress, the dress prescribed by authority or by etiquette to be worn on occasions of ceremony. Full hand (Poker), three of a kind and a pair. Full moon. (a) The moon with its whole disk illuminated, as when opposite to the sun. (b) The time when the moon is full. Full organ (Mus.), the organ when all or most stops are out. Full score (Mus.), a score in which all the parts for voices and instruments are given. Full sea, high water. Full swing, free course; unrestrained liberty; ``Leaving corrupt nature to . . . the full swing and freedom of its own extravagant actings.' South (Colloq.) In full, at length; uncontracted; unabridged; written out in words, and not indicated by figures. In full blast. See under Blast.
In full blast
Full Full, a. [Compar. Fuller; superl. Fullest.] [OE. & AS. ful; akin to OS. ful, D. vol, OHG. fol, G. voll, Icel. fullr, Sw. full, Dan. fuld, Goth. fulls, L. plenus, Gr. ?, Skr. p?rna full, pr? to fill, also to Gr. ? much, E. poly-, pref., G. viel, AS. fela. [root]80. Cf. Complete, Fill, Plenary, Plenty.] 1. Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; -- said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people. Had the throne been full, their meeting would not have been regular. --Blackstone. 2. Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in. quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate; as, a full meal; a full supply; a full voice; a full compensation; a house full of furniture. 3. Not wanting in any essential quality; complete, entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon. It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharaoh dreamed. --Gen. xii. 1. The man commands Like a full soldier. --Shak. I can not Request a fuller satisfaction Than you have freely granted. --Ford. 4. Sated; surfeited. I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. --Is. i. 11. 5. Having the mind filled with ideas; stocked with knowledge; stored with information. Reading maketh a full man. --Bacon. 6. Having the attention, thoughts, etc., absorbed in any matter, and the feelings more or less excited by it, as, to be full of some project. Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions. --Locke. 7. Filled with emotions. The heart is so full that a drop overfills it. --Lowell. 8. Impregnated; made pregnant. [Obs.] Ilia, the fair, . . . full of Mars. --Dryden. At full, when full or complete. --Shak. Full age (Law) the age at which one attains full personal rights; majority; -- in England and the United States the age of 21 years. --Abbott. Full and by (Naut.), sailing closehauled, having all the sails full, and lying as near the wind as poesible. Full band (Mus.), a band in which all the instruments are employed. Full binding, the binding of a book when made wholly of leather, as distinguished from half binding. Full bottom, a kind of wig full and large at the bottom. Full brother or sister, a brother or sister having the same parents as another. Full cry (Hunting), eager chase; -- said of hounds that have caught the scent, and give tongue together. Full dress, the dress prescribed by authority or by etiquette to be worn on occasions of ceremony. Full hand (Poker), three of a kind and a pair. Full moon. (a) The moon with its whole disk illuminated, as when opposite to the sun. (b) The time when the moon is full. Full organ (Mus.), the organ when all or most stops are out. Full score (Mus.), a score in which all the parts for voices and instruments are given. Full sea, high water. Full swing, free course; unrestrained liberty; ``Leaving corrupt nature to . . . the full swing and freedom of its own extravagant actings.' South (Colloq.) In full, at length; uncontracted; unabridged; written out in words, and not indicated by figures. In full blast. See under Blast.
Phoebetria fuliginosa
Sooty Soot"y, a. [Compar Sootier; superl. Sootiest.] [AS. s?tig. See Soot.] 1. Of or pertaining to soot; producing soot; soiled by soot. ``Fire of sooty coal.' --Milton. 2. Having a dark brown or black color like soot; fuliginous; dusky; dark. ``The grisly legions that troop under the sooty flag of Acheron.' --Milton. Sooty albatross (Zo["o]l.), an albatross (Ph[oe]betria fuliginosa) found chiefly in the Pacific Ocean; -- called also nellie. Sooty tern (Zo["o]l.), a tern (Sterna fuliginosa) found chiefly in tropical seas.
S fuliginosa
Tern Tern (t[~e]rn), n. [Dan. terne, t[ae]rne; akin to Sw. t["a]rna, Icel. [thorn]erna; cf. NL. sterna.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of long-winged aquatic birds, allied to the gulls, and belonging to Sterna and various allied genera. Note: Terns differ from gulls chiefly in their graceful form, in their weaker and more slender bills and feet, and their longer and more pointed wings. The tail is usually forked. Most of the species are white with the back and wings pale gray, and often with a dark head. The common European tern (Sterna hirundo) is found also in Asia and America. Among other American species are the arctic tern (S. paradis[ae]a), the roseate tern (S. Dougalli), the least tern (S. Antillarum), the royal tern (S. maxima), and the sooty tern (S. fuliginosa). Hooded tern. See Fairy bird, under Fairy. Marsh tern, any tern of the genus Hydrochelidon. They frequent marshes and rivers and feed largely upon insects. River tern, any tern belonging to Se["e]na or allied genera which frequent rivers. Sea tern, any tern of the genus Thalasseus. Terns of this genus have very long, pointed wings, and chiefly frequent seas and the mouths of large rivers.
Sterna fuliginosa
Sooty Soot"y, a. [Compar Sootier; superl. Sootiest.] [AS. s?tig. See Soot.] 1. Of or pertaining to soot; producing soot; soiled by soot. ``Fire of sooty coal.' --Milton. 2. Having a dark brown or black color like soot; fuliginous; dusky; dark. ``The grisly legions that troop under the sooty flag of Acheron.' --Milton. Sooty albatross (Zo["o]l.), an albatross (Ph[oe]betria fuliginosa) found chiefly in the Pacific Ocean; -- called also nellie. Sooty tern (Zo["o]l.), a tern (Sterna fuliginosa) found chiefly in tropical seas.
Sterna fuliginosa
Egg-bird Egg"-bird`, n. (Zo["o]l.) A species of tern, esp. the sooty tern (Sterna fuliginosa) of the West Indies. In the Bahama Islands the name is applied to the tropic bird, Pha["e]thon flavirostris.
Strepera fuliginosa
Magpie Mag"pie, n. [OE. & Prov. E. magot pie, maggoty pie, fr. Mag, Maggot, equiv. to Margaret, and fr. F. Marquerite, and common name of the magpie. Marguerite is fr. L. margarita pearl, Gr. ?, prob. of Eastern origin. See Pie magpie, and cf. the analogous names Tomtit, and Jackdaw.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of the genus Pica and related genera, allied to the jays, but having a long graduated tail. Note: The common European magpie (Pica pica, or P. caudata) is a black and white noisy and mischievous bird. It can be taught to speak. The American magpie (P. Hudsonica) is very similar. The yellow-belled magpie (P. Nuttalli) inhabits California. The blue magpie (Cyanopolius Cooki) inhabits Spain. Other allied species are found in Asia. The Tasmanian and Australian magpies are crow shrikes, as the white magpie (Gymnorhina organicum), the black magpie (Strepera fuliginosa), and the Australian magpie (Cracticus picatus). Magpie lark (Zo["o]l.), a common Australian bird (Grallina picata), conspicuously marked with black and white; -- called also little magpie. Magpie moth (Zo["o]l.), a black and white European geometrid moth (Abraxas grossulariata); the harlequin moth. Its larva feeds on currant and gooseberry bushes.
U fulva
Elm Elm, n. [AS. elm; akin to D. olm, OHG. elm, G. ulme, Icel. almr, Dan. & Sw. alm, L. ulmus, and E. alder. Cf. Old.] (Bot.) A tree of the genus Ulmus, of several species, much used as a shade tree, particularly in America. The English elm is Ulmus campestris; the common American or white elm is U. Americana; the slippery or red elm, U. fulva. Elm beetle (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of beetles (esp. Galeruca calmariensis), which feed on the leaves of the elm. Elm borer (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of beetles of which the larv[ae] bore into the wood or under the bark of the elm (esp. Saperda tridentata). Elm butterfly (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of butterflies, which, in the caterpillar state, feed on the leaves of the elm (esp. Vanessa antiopa and Grapta comma). See Comma butterfly, under Comma. Elm moth (Zo["o]l.), one of numerous species of moths of which the larv[ae] destroy the leaves of the elm (esp. Eugonia subsignaria, called elm spanworm). Elm sawfly (Zo["o]l.), a large sawfly (Cimbex Americana). The larva, which is white with a black dorsal stripe, feeds on the leaves of the elm.

Meaning of ful from wikipedia

- Ful medames (Arabic: فول مدمس‎, fūl mudammas IPA: [fuːl mudammas]; other spellings include ful mudammas and foule mudammes), or simply fūl, is a stew of...
- Ful or FUL may refer to: Fula language Fula people Ful medames, a fava bean dish of Sudan and Egypt Fullerton Muni****l Airport, California, United States;...
- ful, olives, pickles, and pine nuts. Outside the Middle East, it is sometimes served with tortilla chips or crackers. Hummus ful (pronounced [fuːl])...
- Ful Haus is a Philippine television situational comedy series broadcast by GMA Network. Directed by Bert de Leon, it stars Vic Sotto and Pia Guanio. It...
- "Wonder-ful" is the twenty-first episode of the fourth season of the American musical television series Glee, and the eighty-seventh episode overall....
- Shahan ful, simplified to ful, is a dish common in Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia and other parts of the Horn of Africa, which is generally served...
- new material, including ****ure Moon Shaped Pool tracks "Identikit" and "Ful Stop". On tour in 2012, they recorded two songs at the Third Man Records...
- identifier: ful". ISO 639-2 Registration Authority - Library of Congress. Retrieved 2017-07-04. Name: Fulah "Do****entation for ISO 639 identifier: ful". ISO...
- location in Benjamin is best-known, and generally identified with Tell el-Fūl in northern Jerusalem. Etymology Jibāl (Arabic: جبال‎)Its name means "the...
- The Ful Berg is a mountain of the Plessur Alps, located east of Chur in the canton of Graubünden. It lies at the western end of the chain separating the...