Definition of oxides. Meaning of oxides. Synonyms of oxides

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word oxides. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word oxides and, of course, oxides synonyms and on the right images related to the word oxides.

Definition of oxides

No result for oxide. Showing similar results...

Binoxide
Binoxide Bin*ox"ide, n. [Pref. bin- + oxide.] (Chem.) Same as Dioxide.
Black oxide of manganese
Manganese Man`ga*nese", n. [F. mangan[`e]se, It. manganese, sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of its resemblance to the magnet. See Magnet, and cf. Magnesia.] (Chem.) An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8. Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese) is used to increase the density and hardness of steel. Black oxide of manganese, Manganese dioxide or peroxide, or Black manganese (Chem.), a heavy black powder MnO2, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly manganese. It colors glass violet, and is used as a decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass. Manganese bronze, an alloy made by adding from one to two per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in brass.
Carbon dioxide
Dioxide Di*ox"ide (?; 104), n. [Pref. di- + oxide.] (Chem.) (a) An oxide containing two atoms of oxygen in each molecule; binoxide. (b) An oxide containing but one atom or equivalent of oxygen to two of a metal; a suboxide. [Obs.] Carbon dioxide. See Carbonic acid, under Carbonic.
Carbon dioxide
Carbon Car"bon (k[aum]r"b[o^]n), n. [F. carbone, fr. L. carbo coal; cf. Skr. [,c]r[=a] to cook.] (Chem.) An elementary substance, not metallic in its nature, which is present in all organic compounds. Atomic weight 11.97. Symbol C. it is combustible, and forms the base of lampblack and charcoal, and enters largely into mineral coals. In its pure crystallized state it constitutes the diamond, the hardest of known substances, occuring in monometric crystals like the octahedron, etc. Another modification is graphite, or blacklead, and in this it is soft, and occurs in hexagonal prisms or tables. When united with oxygen it forms carbon dioxide, commonly called carbonic acid, or carbonic oxide, according to the proportions of the oxygen; when united with hydrogen, it forms various compounds called hydrocarbons. Compare Diamond, and Graphite. Carbon compounds, Compounds of carbon (Chem.), those compounds consisting largely of carbon, commonly produced by animals and plants, and hence called organic compounds, though their synthesis may be effected in many cases in the laboratory. The formation of the compounds of carbon is not dependent upon the life process. --I. Remsen Carbon dioxide, Carbon monoxide. (Chem.) See under Carbonic. Carbon light (Elec.), an extremely brilliant electric light produced by passing a galvanic current through two carbon points kept constantly with their apexes neary in contact. Carbon point (Elec.), a small cylinder or bit of gas carbon moved forward by clockwork so that, as it is burned away by the electric current, it shall constantly maintain its proper relation to the opposing point. Carbon tissue, paper coated with gelatine and pigment, used in the autotype process of photography. --Abney. Gas carbon, a compact variety of carbon obtained as an incrustation on the interior of gas retorts, and used for the manufacture of the carbon rods of pencils for the voltaic, arc, and for the plates of voltaic batteries, etc.
carbon dioxide
Carbonic Car*bon"ic, a. [Cf. F. carbonique. See Carbon.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, carbon; as, carbonic oxide. Carbonic acid (Chem.), an acid H2CO3, not existing separately, which, combined with positive or basic atoms or radicals, forms carbonates. In common language the term is very generally applied to a compound of carbon and oxygen, CO2, more correctly called carbon dioxide. It is a colorless, heavy, irrespirable gas, extinguishing flame, and when breathed destroys life. It can be reduced to a liquid and solid form by intense pressure. It is produced in the fermentation of liquors, and by the combustion and decomposition of organic substances, or other substances containing carbon. It is formed in the explosion of fire damp in mines, and is hence called after damp; it is also know as choke damp, and mephitic air. Water will absorb its own volume of it, and more than this under pressure, and in this state becomes the common soda water of the shops, and the carbonated water of natural springs. Combined with lime it constitutes limestone, or common marble and chalk. Plants imbibe it for their nutrition and growth, the carbon being retained and the oxygen given out. Carbonic oxide (Chem.), a colorless gas, CO, of a light odor, called more correctly carbon monoxide. It is almost the only definitely known compound in which carbon seems to be divalent. It is a product of the incomplete combustion of carbon, and is an abundant constituent of water gas. It is fatal to animal life, extinguishes combustion, and burns with a pale blue flame, forming carbon dioxide.
Carbon monoxide
Carbon Car"bon (k[aum]r"b[o^]n), n. [F. carbone, fr. L. carbo coal; cf. Skr. [,c]r[=a] to cook.] (Chem.) An elementary substance, not metallic in its nature, which is present in all organic compounds. Atomic weight 11.97. Symbol C. it is combustible, and forms the base of lampblack and charcoal, and enters largely into mineral coals. In its pure crystallized state it constitutes the diamond, the hardest of known substances, occuring in monometric crystals like the octahedron, etc. Another modification is graphite, or blacklead, and in this it is soft, and occurs in hexagonal prisms or tables. When united with oxygen it forms carbon dioxide, commonly called carbonic acid, or carbonic oxide, according to the proportions of the oxygen; when united with hydrogen, it forms various compounds called hydrocarbons. Compare Diamond, and Graphite. Carbon compounds, Compounds of carbon (Chem.), those compounds consisting largely of carbon, commonly produced by animals and plants, and hence called organic compounds, though their synthesis may be effected in many cases in the laboratory. The formation of the compounds of carbon is not dependent upon the life process. --I. Remsen Carbon dioxide, Carbon monoxide. (Chem.) See under Carbonic. Carbon light (Elec.), an extremely brilliant electric light produced by passing a galvanic current through two carbon points kept constantly with their apexes neary in contact. Carbon point (Elec.), a small cylinder or bit of gas carbon moved forward by clockwork so that, as it is burned away by the electric current, it shall constantly maintain its proper relation to the opposing point. Carbon tissue, paper coated with gelatine and pigment, used in the autotype process of photography. --Abney. Gas carbon, a compact variety of carbon obtained as an incrustation on the interior of gas retorts, and used for the manufacture of the carbon rods of pencils for the voltaic, arc, and for the plates of voltaic batteries, etc.
carbon monoxide
Carbonic Car*bon"ic, a. [Cf. F. carbonique. See Carbon.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, carbon; as, carbonic oxide. Carbonic acid (Chem.), an acid H2CO3, not existing separately, which, combined with positive or basic atoms or radicals, forms carbonates. In common language the term is very generally applied to a compound of carbon and oxygen, CO2, more correctly called carbon dioxide. It is a colorless, heavy, irrespirable gas, extinguishing flame, and when breathed destroys life. It can be reduced to a liquid and solid form by intense pressure. It is produced in the fermentation of liquors, and by the combustion and decomposition of organic substances, or other substances containing carbon. It is formed in the explosion of fire damp in mines, and is hence called after damp; it is also know as choke damp, and mephitic air. Water will absorb its own volume of it, and more than this under pressure, and in this state becomes the common soda water of the shops, and the carbonated water of natural springs. Combined with lime it constitutes limestone, or common marble and chalk. Plants imbibe it for their nutrition and growth, the carbon being retained and the oxygen given out. Carbonic oxide (Chem.), a colorless gas, CO, of a light odor, called more correctly carbon monoxide. It is almost the only definitely known compound in which carbon seems to be divalent. It is a product of the incomplete combustion of carbon, and is an abundant constituent of water gas. It is fatal to animal life, extinguishes combustion, and burns with a pale blue flame, forming carbon dioxide.
Carbonic oxide
Carbonic Car*bon"ic, a. [Cf. F. carbonique. See Carbon.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, carbon; as, carbonic oxide. Carbonic acid (Chem.), an acid H2CO3, not existing separately, which, combined with positive or basic atoms or radicals, forms carbonates. In common language the term is very generally applied to a compound of carbon and oxygen, CO2, more correctly called carbon dioxide. It is a colorless, heavy, irrespirable gas, extinguishing flame, and when breathed destroys life. It can be reduced to a liquid and solid form by intense pressure. It is produced in the fermentation of liquors, and by the combustion and decomposition of organic substances, or other substances containing carbon. It is formed in the explosion of fire damp in mines, and is hence called after damp; it is also know as choke damp, and mephitic air. Water will absorb its own volume of it, and more than this under pressure, and in this state becomes the common soda water of the shops, and the carbonated water of natural springs. Combined with lime it constitutes limestone, or common marble and chalk. Plants imbibe it for their nutrition and growth, the carbon being retained and the oxygen given out. Carbonic oxide (Chem.), a colorless gas, CO, of a light odor, called more correctly carbon monoxide. It is almost the only definitely known compound in which carbon seems to be divalent. It is a product of the incomplete combustion of carbon, and is an abundant constituent of water gas. It is fatal to animal life, extinguishes combustion, and burns with a pale blue flame, forming carbon dioxide.
Carboxide
Carboxide Car*box"ide, n. [Carbon + oxide.] (Chem.) A compound of carbon and oxygen, as carbonyl, with some element or radical; as, potassium carboxide. Potassium carboxide, a grayish explosive crystalline compound, C6O6K, obtained by passing carbon monoxide over heated potassium.
Deutoxide
Deutoxide Deu*tox"ide (?; 104), n. [Pref. deut- + oxide.] (Chem.) A compound containing in the molecule two atoms of oxygen united with some other element or radical; -- usually called dioxide, or less frequently, binoxide.
Dinoxide
Dinoxide Din*ox"ide, n. (Chem.) Same as Dioxide.
Dioxide
Dioxide Di*ox"ide (?; 104), n. [Pref. di- + oxide.] (Chem.) (a) An oxide containing two atoms of oxygen in each molecule; binoxide. (b) An oxide containing but one atom or equivalent of oxygen to two of a metal; a suboxide. [Obs.] Carbon dioxide. See Carbonic acid, under Carbonic.
ethyl oxide
2. Supposed matter above the air; the air itself. 3. (Chem.) (a) A light, volatile, mobile, inflammable liquid, (C2H5)2O, of a characteristic aromatic odor, obtained by the distillation of alcohol with sulphuric acid, and hence called also sulphuric ether. It is powerful solvent of fats, resins, and pyroxylin, but finds its chief use as an an[ae]sthetic. Called also ethyl oxide.
Ferric oxide
Ferric Fer"ric, a. [L. ferrum iron: cf. F. ferrique. See Ferrous.] Pertaining to, derived from, or containing iron. Specifically (Chem.), denoting those compounds in which iron has a higher valence than in the ferrous compounds; as, ferric oxide; ferric acid. Ferric acid (Chem.), an acid, H2FeO4, which is not known in the free state, but forms definite salts, analogous to the chromates and sulphates. Ferric oxide (Chem.), sesquioxide of iron, Fe2O3; hematite. See Hematite.
Hydric dioxide
Hydric Hy"dric, a. [From Hydrogen.] (Chem.) Pertaining to, or containing, hydrogen; as, hydric oxide. Hydric dioxide. (Chem.) See Hydrogen dioxide, under Hydrogen. Hydric oxide (Chem.), water. Hydric sulphate (Chem.), hydrogen sulphate or sulphuric acid.
Hydric oxide
Hydric Hy"dric, a. [From Hydrogen.] (Chem.) Pertaining to, or containing, hydrogen; as, hydric oxide. Hydric dioxide. (Chem.) See Hydrogen dioxide, under Hydrogen. Hydric oxide (Chem.), water. Hydric sulphate (Chem.), hydrogen sulphate or sulphuric acid.
Hydrogen dioxide
Note: Although a gas, hydrogen is chemically similar to the metals in its nature, having the properties of a weak base. It is, in all acids, the base which is replaced by metals and basic radicals to form salts. Like all other gases, it is condensed by great cold and pressure to a liquid which freezes and solidifies by its own evaporation. It is absorbed in large quantities by certain metals (esp. palladium), forming alloy-like compounds; hence, in view of quasi-metallic nature, it is sometimes called hydrogenium. It is the typical reducing agent, as opposed to oxidizers, as oxygen, chlorine, etc. Bicarbureted hydrogen, an old name for ethylene. Carbureted hydrogen gas. See under Carbureted. Hydrogen dioxide, a thick, colorless liquid, H2O2, resembling water, but having a bitter, sour taste, produced by the action of acids on barium peroxide. It decomposes into water and oxygen, and is manufactured in large quantities for an oxidizing and bleaching agent. Called also oxygenated water.
Hydrogen oxide
Hydrogen oxide, a chemical name for water, H?O. Hydrogen sulphide, a colorless inflammable gas, H2S, having the characteristic odor of bad eggs, and found in many mineral springs. It is produced by the action of acids on metallic sulphides, and is an important chemical reagent. Called also sulphureted hydrogen.
Hydroxide
Hydroxide Hy*drox"ide, n. [Hydro-, 2 + oxide.] (Chem.) A hydrate; a substance containing hydrogen and oxygen, made by combining water with an oxide, and yielding water by elimination. The hydroxides are regarded as compounds of hydroxyl, united usually with basic element or radical; as, calcium hydroxide ethyl hydroxide.
Hyperoxide
Hyperoxide Hy`per*ox"ide, n. (Chem.) A compound having a relatively large percentage of oxygen; a peroxide. [Obs.]
hyponitrous oxide
Protoxide Pro*tox"ide, n. [Proto- + oxide: cf. F. protoxide.] (Chem.) That one of a series of oxides having the lowest proportion of oxygen. See Proto-, 2 (b) . protoxide of nitrogen, laughing gas, now called hyponitrous oxide
Manganese dioxide or peroxide
Manganese Man`ga*nese", n. [F. mangan[`e]se, It. manganese, sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of its resemblance to the magnet. See Magnet, and cf. Magnesia.] (Chem.) An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8. Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese) is used to increase the density and hardness of steel. Black oxide of manganese, Manganese dioxide or peroxide, or Black manganese (Chem.), a heavy black powder MnO2, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly manganese. It colors glass violet, and is used as a decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass. Manganese bronze, an alloy made by adding from one to two per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in brass.
Mesityl oxide
Mesityl Mes"i*tyl, n. (Chem.) A hypothetical radical formerly supposed to exist in mesityl oxide. Mesityl oxide (Chem.), a volatile liquid having the odor of peppermint, obtained by certain dehydrating agents from acetone; -- formerly called also dumasin.
methyl oxide
; -- called also methol, carbinol, etc. Methyl amine (Chem.), a colorless, inflammable, alkaline gas, CH3.NH2, having an ammoniacal, fishy odor. It is produced artificially, and also occurs naturally in herring brine and other fishy products. It is regarded as ammonia in which a third of its hydrogen is replaced by methyl, and is a type of the class of substituted ammonias. Methyl ether (Chem.), a light, volatile ether CH3.O.CH3, obtained by the etherification of methyl alcohol; -- called also methyl oxide. Methyl green. (Chem.) See under Green, n. Methyl orange. (Chem.) See Helianthin. Methyl violet (Chem.), an artificial dye, consisting of certain methyl halogen derivatives of rosaniline.
Monoxide
Monoxide Mo*nox"ide, n. [Mon- + oxide.] (Chem.) An oxide containing one atom of oxygen in each molecule; as, barium monoxide.
Nitric oxide
Nitric Ni"tric, a. [Cf. F. nitrique. See Niter.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, nitrogen; specifically, designating any one of those compounds in which, as contrasted with nitrous compounds, the element has a higher valence; as, nitric oxide; nitric acid. Nitric acid, a colorless or yellowish liquid obtained by distilling a nitrate with sulphuric acid. It is powerfully corrosive, being a strong acid, and in decomposition a strong oxidizer. Nitric anhydride, a white crystalline oxide of nitrogen (N2O5), called nitric pentoxide, and regarded as the anhydride of nitric acid. Nitric oxide, a colorless poisous gas (NO) obtained by treating nitric acid with copper. On contact with the air or with oxygen, it becomes reddish brown from the formation of nitric dioxide or peroxide.
nitric pentoxide
Nitric Ni"tric, a. [Cf. F. nitrique. See Niter.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, nitrogen; specifically, designating any one of those compounds in which, as contrasted with nitrous compounds, the element has a higher valence; as, nitric oxide; nitric acid. Nitric acid, a colorless or yellowish liquid obtained by distilling a nitrate with sulphuric acid. It is powerfully corrosive, being a strong acid, and in decomposition a strong oxidizer. Nitric anhydride, a white crystalline oxide of nitrogen (N2O5), called nitric pentoxide, and regarded as the anhydride of nitric acid. Nitric oxide, a colorless poisous gas (NO) obtained by treating nitric acid with copper. On contact with the air or with oxygen, it becomes reddish brown from the formation of nitric dioxide or peroxide.
Nitrous oxide
Nitrous Ni"trous, a. [L. nitrosus full of natron: cf. F. nitreux. See Niter.] 1. Of, pertaining to, or containing, niter; of the quality of niter, or resembling it. 2. (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, any one of those compounds in which nitrogen has a relatively lower valence as contrasted with nitric compounds. Nitrous acid (Chem.), a hypothetical acid of nitrogen HNO2, not known in the free state, but forming a well known series of salts, viz., the nitrites. Nitrous oxide. See Laughing gas.
Osmic tetroxide
Osmic Os"mic, a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, osmium; specifically, designating those compounds in which it has a valence higher than in other lower compounds; as, osmic oxide. Osmic acid. (Chem.) (a) Osmic tetroxide. [Obs.] (b) Osmic acid proper, an acid analogous to sulphuric acid, not known in the free state, but forming a well-known and stable series of salts (osmates), which were formerly improperly called osmites. Osmic tetroxide (Chem.), a white volatile crystalline substance, OsO4, the most stable and characteristic of the compounds of osmium. It has a burning taste, and gives off a vapor, which is a powerful irritant poison, violently attacking the eyes, and emitting a strong chlorinelike odor. Formerly improperly called osmic acid.
Paradoxides
Paradoxides Par`a*dox"i*des, n. [NL.] (Paleon.) A genus of large trilobites characteristic of the primordial formations.

Meaning of oxide from wikipedia

- an oxide /ˈɒksaɪd/ is a chemical compound that contains at least one oxygen atom and one other element in its chemical formula. metal oxides typically
- oxides are chemical compounds composed of iron and oxygen. all together, there are sixteen known iron oxides and oxyhydroxides. iron oxides and oxide-hydroxides
- copper oxide is a compound from the two elements copper and oxygen. copper oxide may refer to: copper(i) oxide (cuprous oxide, cu2o), a red powder copper(ii)
- nitrogen(ii) oxide nitrogen dioxide (no2), nitrogen(iv) oxide nitrous oxide (n2o), nitrogen(−i,iii) oxide nitrosylazide (n4o), nitrogen(−i,0,i,ii) oxide dinitrogen
- cobalt oxide may refer to cobalt(ii) oxide (cobaltous oxide) - coo cobalt(iii) oxide (cobaltic oxide) - co2o3 cobalt(ii,iii) oxide - co3o4
- samarium(iii) oxide (sm2o3) is a chemical compound. samarium(iii) oxide is used in optical and infrared absorbing gl**** to absorb infrared radiation
- titanium oxide may refer to: titanium dioxide (titanium(iv) oxide), tio2 titanium(ii) oxide (titanium monoxide), tio, a non-stoichiometric oxide titanium(iii)
- this page is about a red-colored oxide of iron. for other uses, see red iron. iron(iii) oxide or ferric oxide is the inorganic compound with the formula