Definition of calyptus. Meaning of calyptus. Synonyms of calyptus

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Definition of calyptus

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Eucalyptus
Eucalyptus Eu`ca*lyp"tus, n. [NL., from GR. ? well, good + ? covered. The buds of Eucalyptus have a hemispherical or conical covering, which falls off at anthesis.] (Bot.) A myrtaceous genus of trees, mostly Australian. Many of them grow to an immense height, one or two species exceeding the height even of the California Sequoia. Note: They have rigid, entire leaves with one edge turned toward the zenith. Most of them secrete resinous gums, whence they called gum trees, and their timber is of great value. Eucalyptus Globulus is the blue gum; E. gigantea, the stringy bark: E. amygdalina, the peppermint tree. E. Gunnii, the Tasmanian cider tree, yields a refreshing drink from wounds made in the bark in the spring. Other species yield oils, tars, acids, dyes and tans. It is said that miasmatic valleys in Algeria and Portugal, and a part of the unhealthy Roman Campagna, have been made more salubrious by planting groves of these trees.
Eucalyptus
Bloodwood Blood"wood, n. (Bot.) A tree having the wood or the sap of the color of blood. Note: Norfolk Island bloodwood is a euphorbiaceous tree (Baloghia lucida), from which the sap is collected for use as a plant. Various other trees have the name, chiefly on account of the color of the wood, as Gordonia H[ae]matoxylon of Jamaica, and several species of Australian Eucalyptus; also the true logwood ( H[ae]matoxylon campechianum).
Eucalyptus amygdalina
Peppermint Pep"per*mint, n. [Pepper + mint.] 1. (Bot.) An aromatic and pungent plant of the genus Mentha (M. piperita), much used in medicine and confectionery. 2. A volatile oil (oil of peppermint) distilled from the fresh herb; also, a well-known essence or spirit (essence of peppermint) obtained from it. 3. A lozenge of sugar flavored with peppermint. Peppermint camphor. (Chem.) Same as Menthol. Peppermint tree (Bot.), a name given to several Australian species of gum tree (Eucalyptus amygdalina, E. piperita, E. odorata, etc.) which have hard and durable wood, and yield an essential oil.
Eucalyptus dumosa
Mallee Mal"lee, n. [Native name.] 1. (Bot.) A dwarf Australian eucalypt with a number of thin stems springing from a thickened stock. The most common species are Eucalyptus dumosa and E. Gracilis. 2. Scrub or thicket formed by the mallee. [Australia]
Eucalyptus Globulus
Eucalyptus Eu`ca*lyp"tus, n. [NL., from GR. ? well, good + ? covered. The buds of Eucalyptus have a hemispherical or conical covering, which falls off at anthesis.] (Bot.) A myrtaceous genus of trees, mostly Australian. Many of them grow to an immense height, one or two species exceeding the height even of the California Sequoia. Note: They have rigid, entire leaves with one edge turned toward the zenith. Most of them secrete resinous gums, whence they called gum trees, and their timber is of great value. Eucalyptus Globulus is the blue gum; E. gigantea, the stringy bark: E. amygdalina, the peppermint tree. E. Gunnii, the Tasmanian cider tree, yields a refreshing drink from wounds made in the bark in the spring. Other species yield oils, tars, acids, dyes and tans. It is said that miasmatic valleys in Algeria and Portugal, and a part of the unhealthy Roman Campagna, have been made more salubrious by planting groves of these trees.
Eucalyptus longifolia
Woolly Wool"ly, a. 1. Consisting of wool; as, a woolly covering; a woolly fleece. 2. Resembling wool; of the nature of wool. ``My fleece of woolly hair.' --Shak. 3. Clothed with wool. ``Woolly breeders.' --Shak. 4. (Bot.) Clothed with a fine, curly pubescence resembling wool. Woolly bear (Zo["o]l.), the hairy larva of several species of bombycid moths. The most common species in the United States are the salt-marsh caterpillar (see under Salt), the black and red woolly bear, or larva of the Isabella moth (see Illust., under Isabella Moth), and the yellow woolly bear, or larva of the American ermine moth (Spilosoma Virginica). Woolly butt (Bot.), an Australian tree (Eucalyptus longifolia), so named because of its fibrous bark. Woolly louse (Zo["o]l.), a plant louse (Schizoneura, or Erisoma, lanigera) which is often very injurious to the apple tree. It is covered with a dense coat of white filaments somewhat resembling fine wool or cotton. In exists in two forms, one of which infests the roots, the other the branches. See Illust. under Blight. Woolly macaco (Zo["o]l.), the mongoose lemur. Woolly maki (Zo["o]l.), a long-tailed lemur (Indris laniger) native of Madagascar, having fur somewhat like wool; -- called also avahi, and woolly lemur. Woolly monkey (Zo["o]l.), any South American monkey of the genus Lagothrix, as the caparro. Woolly rhinoceros (Paleon.), an extinct rhinoceros (Rhinoceros tichorhinus) which inhabited the arctic regions, and was covered with a dense coat of woolly hair. It has been found frozen in the ice of Siberia, with the flesh and hair well preserved.
Eucalyptus piluralis
Flintwood Flint"wood`, n. (Bot.) An Australian name for the very hard wood of the Eucalyptus piluralis.
Eucalyptus Sideroxylon
Ironbark tree I"ron*bark` tree` (Bot.) The Australian Eucalyptus Sideroxylon, used largely by carpenters and shipbuilders; -- called also ironwood.
Eucalyptus Sideroxylon
Ironwood I"ron*wood`, n. (Bot.) A tree unusually hard, strong, or heavy wood. Note: In the United States, the hornbeam and the hop hornbeam are so called; also the Olneya Tesota, a small tree of Arizona; in the West Indies, the Erythroxylon areolatum, and several other unrelated trees; in China, the Metrosideros vera; in India, the Mesua ferrea, and two species of Inga; in Australia, the Eucalyptus Sideroxylon, and in many countries, species of Sideroxylon and Diospyros, and many other trees.

Meaning of calyptu from wikipedia