Definition of Strigil. Meaning of Strigil. Synonyms of Strigil

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Strigil. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Strigil and, of course, Strigil synonyms and on the right images related to the word Strigil.

Definition of Strigil

Strigil
Strigil Strig"il, n. [L. strigilis, from stringere to graze, scrape.] (Gr. & Rom. Antiq.) An instrument of metal, ivory, etc., used for scraping the skin at the bath.

Meaning of Strigil from wikipedia

- The strigil (Gr****: στλεγγίς, romanized: stleggís) is a tool for the cleansing of the body by s****ing off dirt, perspiration, and oil that was applied...
- butler Soap shaker Sonic soot blowers Sponge (material) Squeegee Steam mop Strigil Swiffer Tawashi Thor washing machine Tongue cleaner Turk's head brush Vacuum...
- (where oils were m****aged into the skin and s****ed from the body with a strigil), ball court, or outdoor swimming pool. Baths had hypocaust heating: the...
- from his body with the small curved instrument that the Romans called a strigil. The most renowned Apoxyomenos in Cl****ical Antiquity was that of Lysippos...
- sweat and dust from his body with the small curved instrument called a strigil. After the Croatian Apoxyomenos was raised from the sea in 1999, it was...
- olive oil to cleanse themselves by applying it to their bodies and using a strigil to remove the excess. This was sometimes left on the floor for the slaves...
- oil into the skin and then s****e away both the oil and any dirt with a strigil. The Gauls used soap made from animal fat. Zosimos of Panopolis, circa...
- scalp or the skin. Another ancient device that creates mild bruising is a strigil, used by Gr****s and Romans in the bath. Archaeologically there is no precedent...
- upon the bare ground; and never washed or cleansed his body with oil and strigil." Smedley, Edward; Rose, Hugh James; Rose, Henry John. (1845). Encyclopaedia...
- widely available), shower,[citation needed] and remove the excess with a strigil (cf. the well known Apoxyomenus of Lysippus from the Vatican Museum). Often...
Loading...