Definition of Nuncupative. Meaning of Nuncupative. Synonyms of Nuncupative

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Nuncupative. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Nuncupative and, of course, Nuncupative synonyms and on the right images related to the word Nuncupative.

Definition of Nuncupative

Nuncupative
Nuncupative Nun*cu"pa*tive, a. [L. nuncupativus nominal: cf. F. nuncupatif.] 1. Publicly or solemnly declaratory. [Obs.] 2. Nominal; existing only in name. [Obs.] 3. Oral; not written. Nuncupative will or testament, a will or testament made by word of mouth only, before witnesses, as by a soldier or seaman, and depending on oral testimony for proof. --Blackstone.

Meaning of Nuncupative from wikipedia

- An oral will (or nuncupative will) is a will that has been delivered orally (that is, in speech) to witnesses, as opposed to the usual form of wills,...
- as incapacity or undue influence. Types of wills generally include: nuncupative (non-culpatory) - oral or dictated; often limited to sailors or military...
- 1459, Paston's father claimed that on 3 November Fastolf had made a nuncupative will giving Paston exclusive authority over the foundation of the college...
- cases where no devise is made. Sections 18 through 20 provide rules for nuncupative (oral) wills for personal estates valued at over 30 pounds may be only...
- November 1459, Paston claimed that on 3 November Fastolf had made a nuncupative will giving Paston exclusive authority over the foundation of the college...
- of seven witnesses; and it could not be changed – these they called nuncupative wills; but the danger of trusting the will of the deceased to the memory...
- the form of another book of epigrams) and corrections. Campion made a nuncupative will on 1 March 1619/20 before 'divers credible witnesses': a memorandum...
- ownership of Selly Oak was challenged by the Bishop of Lichfield using a nuncupative (oral) will made by Wulfwin as evidence. It would appear that William...
- two days before his death, according to John Paston, Fastolf made a nuncupative (spoken) will in which he bequeathed all his lands in Norfolk and Suffolk...
- to Charles the Bold. Paston's father claimed to have inherited, via a nuncupative will, the lands of the wealthy and childless Sir John Fastolf, a kinsman...
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