Definition of Nancy. Meaning of Nancy. Synonyms of Nancy

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Nancy. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Nancy and, of course, Nancy synonyms and on the right images related to the word Nancy.

Definition of Nancy

No result for Nancy. Showing similar results...

Benignancy
Benignancy Be*nig"nan*cy, n. Benignant quality; kindliness.
Consonancy
Consonance Con"so*nance, Consonancy Con"so*nan*cy, n. [L. consonantia: cf. F. consonnance.] 1. (Mus.) Accord or agreement of sounds produced simultaneously, as a note with its third, fifth, and eighth. 2. Agreement or congruity; harmony; accord; consistency; suitableness. The perfect consonancy of our persecuted church to the doctrines of Scripture and antiquity. --Hammond. The optic nerve responds to the waves with which it is in consonance. --Tyndall. 3. Friendship; concord. [Obs.] By the consonancy of our youth. --Shak. Syn: Agreement; accord; consistency; unison; harmony; congruity; suitableness; agreeableness.
Dissonancy
Dissonancy Dis"so*nan*cy, n. Discord; dissonance.
Dominancy
Dominance Dom"i*nance, Dominancy Dom"i*nan*cy, n. Predominance; ascendency; authority.
Extra-uterine pregnancy
Extra-uterine Ex`tra-u"ter*ine, a. (Anat. & Med.) Outside of the uterus, or womb. Extra-uterine pregnancy (Med.), a condition of pregnancy in which the fetus is not in the uterus, but in the Fallopian tube or in the abdominal cavity.
Fritinancy
Fritinancy Frit"i*nan*cy, n. [L. fritinnire to twitter.] A chirping or creaking, as of a cricket. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne.
Inconsonancy
Inconsonance In*con"so*nance, Inconsonancy In*con"so*nan*cy, n. Want of consonance or harmony of sound, action, or thought; disagreement.
Indignancy
Indignance In*dig"nance, Indignancy In*dig"nan*cy, n. Indignation. [Obs.] --Spenser.
Joint tenancy
Joint Joint, a. [F., p. p. of joindre. See Join.] 1. Joined; united; combined; concerted; as joint action. 2. Involving the united activity of two or more; done or produced by two or more working together. I read this joint effusion twice over. --T. Hook. 3. United, joined, or sharing with another or with others; not solitary in interest or action; holding in common with an associate, or with associates; acting together; as, joint heir; joint creditor; joint debtor, etc. ``Joint tenants of the world.' --Donne. 4. Shared by, or affecting two or more; held in common; as, joint property; a joint bond. A joint burden laid upon us all. --Shak. Joint committee (Parliamentary Practice), a committee composed of members of the two houses of a legislative body, for the appointment of which concurrent resolutions of the two houses are necessary. --Cushing. Joint meeting, or Joint session, the meeting or session of two distinct bodies as one; as, a joint meeting of committees representing different corporations; a joint session of both branches of a State legislature to chose a United States senator. ``Such joint meeting shall not be dissolved until the electoral votes are all counted and the result declared.' --Joint Rules of Congress, U. S. Joint resolution (Parliamentary Practice), a resolution adopted concurrently by the two branches of a legislative body. ``By the constitution of the United States and the rules of the two houses, no absolute distinction is made between bills and joint resolutions.' --Barclay (Digest). Joint rule (Parliamentary Practice), a rule of proceeding adopted by the concurrent action of both branches of a legislative assembly. ``Resolved, by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), that the sixteenth and seventeenth joint rules be suspended for the remainder of the session.' --Journal H. of R., U. S. Joint and several (Law), a phrase signifying that the debt, credit, obligation, etc., to which it is applied is held in such a way that the parties in interest are engaged both together and individually thus a joint and several debt is one for which all the debtors may be sued together or either of them individually. Joint stock, stock held in company. Joint-stock company (Law), a species of partnership, consisting generally of a large number of members, having a capital divided, or agreed to be divided, into shares, the shares owned by any member being usually transferable without the consent of the rest. Joint tenancy (Law), a tenure by two or more persons of estate by unity of interest, title, time, and possession, under which the survivor takes the whole. --Blackstone. Joint tenant (Law), one who holds an estate by joint tenancy.
Lieutenancy
Lieutenancy Lieu*ten"an*cy (l[-u]*t[e^]n"an*s[y^]; 277), n. 1. The office, rank, or commission, of a lieutenant. 2. The body of lieutenants or subordinates. [Obs.] The list of the lieutenancy of our metropolis. --Felton.
Malignancy
Malignance Ma*lig"nance, Malignancy Ma*lig"nan*cy, n. [See Malignant.] 1. The state or quality of being malignant; extreme malevolence; bitter enmity; malice; as, malignancy of heart. 2. Unfavorableness; evil nature. The malignancy of my fate might perhaps distemner yours. --Shak. 3. (Med.) Virulence; tendency to a fatal issue; as, the malignancy of an ulcer or of a fever. 4. The state of being a malignant. Syn: Malice; malevolence; malignity. See Malice.
Oppugnancy
Oppugnancy Op*pug"nan*cy, n. [See Oppugnant.] The act of oppugning; opposition; resistance. --Shak.
Pernancy
Pernancy Per"nan*cy, n. [OF. prenance, fr. prendre, prenre, penre, to take, L. prendere, prehendere.] (Law) A taking or reception, as the receiving of rents or tithes in kind, the receiving of profits. --Blackstone.
Poignancy
Poignancy Poign"an*cy, n. The quality or state of being poignant; as, the poignancy of satire; the poignancy of grief. --Swift.
Predominancy
Predominancy Pre*dom"i*nan*cy, n. Predominance. --Bacon.
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Preg"nan*cy, n. 1. The condition of being pregnant; the state of being with young. 2. Figuratively: The quality of being heavy with important contents, issue, significance, etc.; unusual consequence or capacity; fertility. --Fuller.
Regnancy
Regnancy Reg"nan*cy (-nan*s?), n. The condition or quality of being regnant; sovereignty; rule. --Coleridge.
Resonancy
Resonancy Res"o*nan*cy (-nan-s?), n. Resonance.
Squinancy
Squinance Squin"ance, Squinancy Squin"an*cy, n. [F. esquinancie, OF. squinance, esquinance. See Quinsy.] 1. (Med.) The quinsy. See Quinsy. [Obs.] 2. (Bot.) A European perennial herb (Asperula cynanchica) with narrowly linear whorled leaves; -- formerly thought to cure the quinsy. Also called quincewort. Squinancy berries, black currants; -- so called because used to cure the quinsy. --Dr. Prior.
squinancy
Quinsy Quin"sy, n. [Contr. fr. squinancy, F. esquinancie, L. cynanche a sort of sore throat, Gr. ? sore throat, dog quinsy, fr. ? dog + ? to choke; cf. also L. synanche sore throat, Gr. ?. Cf. Hound, Anger, and Cynanche.] (Med.) An inflammation of the throat, or parts adjacent, especially of the fauces or tonsils, attended by considerable swelling, painful and impeded deglutition, and accompanied by inflammatory fever. It sometimes creates danger of suffocation; -- called also squinancy, and squinzey.
Squinancy berries
Squinance Squin"ance, Squinancy Squin"an*cy, n. [F. esquinancie, OF. squinance, esquinance. See Quinsy.] 1. (Med.) The quinsy. See Quinsy. [Obs.] 2. (Bot.) A European perennial herb (Asperula cynanchica) with narrowly linear whorled leaves; -- formerly thought to cure the quinsy. Also called quincewort. Squinancy berries, black currants; -- so called because used to cure the quinsy. --Dr. Prior.
Stagnancy
Stagnancy Stag"nan*cy, n. State of being stagnant.
Subordinancy
Subordinance Sub*or"di*nance, Subordinancy Sub*or"di*nan*cy, n. [Pref. sub + L. ordinans, p. pr. of ordinare. See Subordinate, a.] Subordinacy; subordination. [Obs.] --Dr. H. More. Sir W. Temple.
Tenancy
Tenancy Ten"an*cy, n.; pl. Tenacies. [Cf. OF. tenace, LL. tenentia. See Tenant.] (Law) (a) A holding, or a mode of holding, an estate; tenure; the temporary possession of what belongs to another. (b) (O. Eng. Law) A house for habitation, or place to live in, held of another. --Blount. Blackstone. Wharton.
Undertenancy
Undertenancy Un"der*ten`an*cy, n. Tenancy or tenure under a tenant or lessee; the tenure of an undertenant.

Meaning of Nancy from wikipedia

- Arrondis****t of Nancy, surrounding and including the city of Nancy Roman Catholic Diocese of Nancy, surrounding and including the city of Nancy Nancy-sur-Cluses...
- Family on ABC, where she was credited for the first time as Nancy Carell instead of Nancy Walls. Carell occasionally guest-starred on The Office, which...
- Sportive Nancy-Lorraine (French pronunciation: ​[asɔsjasjɔ̃ spɔʁtiv nɑ̃si lɔʁɛn], commonly known as AS Nancy-Lorraine, ASNL, or simply Nancy) is a French...
- Office U.S. Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi official site for the Congresswoman's Office Nancy Pelosi for Congress website, Nancy Pelosi at Curlie Biography...
- Details for Nancy Dow in Household of Gordon Dow, "United States Census, 1940" Jennifer Aniston's Mother Nancy Dow Dies at Age 79 Aniston, Nancy (September...
- Nancy Sandra Sinatra (born June 8, 1940) is an American singer and actress. She is the elder daughter of Frank Sinatra and Nancy (Barbato) Sinatra, and...
- Nancy Fuller (also known as Nancy Fuller Ginsberg or Nancy Ginsberg; born March 27, 1949) is an American chef and businesswoman from Claverack, New York...
- October 18, 2007. Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 85. Reagan, Nancy (1989), p. 88. Metzger, Robert Paul (1989), pp. 31–32. "Biography for Nancy Davis". Turner Broadcasting...
- Magazine. April 8, 1974. "Nancy Kissinger Hospitalized with Undisclosed Ailment". Seattle Times. December 18, 1994. "Nancy Maginnes Kissinger." Almanac...
- Nancy Karen Morgan (born April 1, 1949) is an American actress. Morgan is the daughter of Marjorie ([née Greenfield) and Samuel A. Morgan Jr. She is a...
Loading...