Definition of Harmon. Meaning of Harmon. Synonyms of Harmon

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Harmon. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Harmon and, of course, Harmon synonyms and on the right images related to the word Harmon.

Definition of Harmon

No result for Harmon. Showing similar results...

chemical harmonicon
Singing Sing"ing, a. & n. from Sing, v. Singing bird. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Popularly, any bird that sings; a song bird. (b) Specifically, any one of the Oscines. Singing book, a book containing music for singing; a book of tunes. Singing falcon or hawk. (Zo["o]l.) See Chanting falcon, under Chanting. Singing fish (Zo["o]l.), a California toadfish (Porichthys porosissimus). Singing flame (Acoustics), a flame, as of hydrogen or coal gas, burning within a tube and so adjusted as to set the air within the tube in vibration, causing sound. The apparatus is called also chemical harmonicon. Singing master, a man who teaches vocal music. Singing school, a school in which persons are instructed in singing.
Close harmony
Harmony Har"mo*ny, n.; pl. Harmonies. [ F. harmonic, L. harmonia, Gr. ? joint, proportion, concord, fr. ? a fitting or joining. See Article. ] 1. The just adaptation of parts to each other, in any system or combination of things, or in things, or things intended to form a connected whole; such an agreement between the different parts of a design or composition as to produce unity of effect; as, the harmony of the universe. 2. Concord or agreement in facts, opinions, manners, interests, etc.; good correspondence; peace and friendship; as, good citizens live in harmony. 3. A literary work which brings together or arranges systematically parallel passages of historians respecting the same events, and shows their agreement or consistency; as, a harmony of the Gospels. 4. (Mus.) (a) A succession of chords according to the rules of progression and modulation. (b) The science which treats of their construction and progression. Ten thousand harps, that tuned Angelic harmonies. --Milton. 5. (Anat.) See Harmonic suture, under Harmonic. Close harmony, Dispersed harmony, etc. See under Close, Dispersed, etc. Harmony of the spheres. See Music of the spheres, under Music. Syn: Harmony, Melody. Usage: Harmony results from the concord of two or more strains or sounds which differ in pitch and quality. Melody denotes the pleasing alternation and variety of musical and measured sounds, as they succeed each other in a single verse or strain.
Disharmonious
Disharmonious Dis`har*mo"ni*ous, a. Unharmonious; discordant. [Obs.] --Hallywell.
Disharmony
Disharmony Dis*har"mo*ny, n. Want of harmony; discord; incongruity. [R.] A disharmony in the different impulses that constitute it [our nature]. --Coleridge.
Dispersed harmony
Dispersed Dis*persed", a. Scattered. -- Dis*pers"ed*ly, adv. -- Dis*pers"ed*ness, n. Dispersed harmony (Mus.), harmony in which the tones composing the chord are widely separated, as by an octave or more.
Dispersed harmony
Harmony Har"mo*ny, n.; pl. Harmonies. [ F. harmonic, L. harmonia, Gr. ? joint, proportion, concord, fr. ? a fitting or joining. See Article. ] 1. The just adaptation of parts to each other, in any system or combination of things, or in things, or things intended to form a connected whole; such an agreement between the different parts of a design or composition as to produce unity of effect; as, the harmony of the universe. 2. Concord or agreement in facts, opinions, manners, interests, etc.; good correspondence; peace and friendship; as, good citizens live in harmony. 3. A literary work which brings together or arranges systematically parallel passages of historians respecting the same events, and shows their agreement or consistency; as, a harmony of the Gospels. 4. (Mus.) (a) A succession of chords according to the rules of progression and modulation. (b) The science which treats of their construction and progression. Ten thousand harps, that tuned Angelic harmonies. --Milton. 5. (Anat.) See Harmonic suture, under Harmonic. Close harmony, Dispersed harmony, etc. See under Close, Dispersed, etc. Harmony of the spheres. See Music of the spheres, under Music. Syn: Harmony, Melody. Usage: Harmony results from the concord of two or more strains or sounds which differ in pitch and quality. Melody denotes the pleasing alternation and variety of musical and measured sounds, as they succeed each other in a single verse or strain.
Enharmonic
Enharmonic En`har*mon"ic, Enharmonical En`har*mon"ic*al, a. [Gr. ? ?, ? fitting, accordant; ? in + ? harmony: cf. F. enharmonique.]
Enharmonical
Enharmonic En`har*mon"ic, Enharmonical En`har*mon"ic*al, a. [Gr. ? ?, ? fitting, accordant; ? in + ? harmony: cf. F. enharmonique.]
Enharmonically
Enharmonically En`har*mon"ic*al*ly, adv. In the enharmonic style or system; in just intonation.
Euharmonic
Euharmonic Eu`har*mon"ic, a. [Pref. -eu + harmonic.] (Mus.) Producing mathematically perfect harmony or concord; sweetly or perfectly harmonious.
Harmonic
Harmonic Har*mon"ic, Harmonical Har*mon"ic*al, a. [L. harmonicus, Gr. ?; cf. F. harmonique. See Harmony.] 1. Concordant; musical; consonant; as, harmonic sounds. Harmonic twang! of leather, horn, and brass. --Pope. 2. (Mus.) Relating to harmony, -- as melodic relates to melody; harmonious; esp., relating to the accessory sounds or overtones which accompany the predominant and apparent single tone of any string or sonorous body. 3. (Math.) Having relations or properties bearing some resemblance to those of musical consonances; -- said of certain numbers, ratios, proportions, points, lines. motions, and the like. Harmonic interval (Mus.), the distance between two notes of a chord, or two consonant notes. Harmonical mean (Arith. & Alg.), certain relations of numbers and quantities, which bear an analogy to musical consonances. Harmonic motion,
Harmonic
Harmonic Har*mon"ic, n. (Mus.) A musical note produced by a number of vibrations which is a multiple of the number producing some other; an overtone. See Harmonics.
Harmonic interval
Harmonic Har*mon"ic, Harmonical Har*mon"ic*al, a. [L. harmonicus, Gr. ?; cf. F. harmonique. See Harmony.] 1. Concordant; musical; consonant; as, harmonic sounds. Harmonic twang! of leather, horn, and brass. --Pope. 2. (Mus.) Relating to harmony, -- as melodic relates to melody; harmonious; esp., relating to the accessory sounds or overtones which accompany the predominant and apparent single tone of any string or sonorous body. 3. (Math.) Having relations or properties bearing some resemblance to those of musical consonances; -- said of certain numbers, ratios, proportions, points, lines. motions, and the like. Harmonic interval (Mus.), the distance between two notes of a chord, or two consonant notes. Harmonical mean (Arith. & Alg.), certain relations of numbers and quantities, which bear an analogy to musical consonances. Harmonic motion,
Harmonic motion
Harmonic Har*mon"ic, Harmonical Har*mon"ic*al, a. [L. harmonicus, Gr. ?; cf. F. harmonique. See Harmony.] 1. Concordant; musical; consonant; as, harmonic sounds. Harmonic twang! of leather, horn, and brass. --Pope. 2. (Mus.) Relating to harmony, -- as melodic relates to melody; harmonious; esp., relating to the accessory sounds or overtones which accompany the predominant and apparent single tone of any string or sonorous body. 3. (Math.) Having relations or properties bearing some resemblance to those of musical consonances; -- said of certain numbers, ratios, proportions, points, lines. motions, and the like. Harmonic interval (Mus.), the distance between two notes of a chord, or two consonant notes. Harmonical mean (Arith. & Alg.), certain relations of numbers and quantities, which bear an analogy to musical consonances. Harmonic motion,
Harmonic progression
Progression Pro*gres"sion, n. [L. progressio: cf. F. progression.] 1. The act of moving forward; a proceeding in a course; motion onward. 2. Course; passage; lapse or process of time. I hope, in a short progression, you will be wholly immerged in the delices and joys of religion. --Evelyn. 3. (Math.) Regular or proportional advance in increase or decrease of numbers; continued proportion, arithmetical, geometrical, or harmonic. 4. (Mus.) A regular succession of tones or chords; the movement of the parts in harmony; the order of the modulations in a piece from key to key. Arithmetical progression, a progression in which the terms increase or decrease by equal differences, as the numbers [lbrace2]2, 4, 6, 8, 1010, 8, 6, 4, 2[rbrace2] by the difference 2. Geometrical progression, a progression in which the terms increase or decrease by equal ratios, as the numbers [lbrace2]2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 6464, 32, 16, 8, 4, 2[rbrace2] by a continual multiplication or division by 2. Harmonic progression, a progression in which the terms are the reciprocals of quantities in arithmetical progression, as 1/2, 1/4, 1/6, 1/8, 1/10.
Harmonica
Harmonica Har*mon"i*ca, n. [Fem. fr. L. harmonicus harmonic. See Harmonic, n. ] 1. A musical instrument, consisting of a series of hemispherical glasses which, by touching the edges with the dampened finger, give forth the tones.
Harmonical
Harmonic Har*mon"ic, Harmonical Har*mon"ic*al, a. [L. harmonicus, Gr. ?; cf. F. harmonique. See Harmony.] 1. Concordant; musical; consonant; as, harmonic sounds. Harmonic twang! of leather, horn, and brass. --Pope. 2. (Mus.) Relating to harmony, -- as melodic relates to melody; harmonious; esp., relating to the accessory sounds or overtones which accompany the predominant and apparent single tone of any string or sonorous body. 3. (Math.) Having relations or properties bearing some resemblance to those of musical consonances; -- said of certain numbers, ratios, proportions, points, lines. motions, and the like. Harmonic interval (Mus.), the distance between two notes of a chord, or two consonant notes. Harmonical mean (Arith. & Alg.), certain relations of numbers and quantities, which bear an analogy to musical consonances. Harmonic motion,
Harmonical mean
Harmonic Har*mon"ic, Harmonical Har*mon"ic*al, a. [L. harmonicus, Gr. ?; cf. F. harmonique. See Harmony.] 1. Concordant; musical; consonant; as, harmonic sounds. Harmonic twang! of leather, horn, and brass. --Pope. 2. (Mus.) Relating to harmony, -- as melodic relates to melody; harmonious; esp., relating to the accessory sounds or overtones which accompany the predominant and apparent single tone of any string or sonorous body. 3. (Math.) Having relations or properties bearing some resemblance to those of musical consonances; -- said of certain numbers, ratios, proportions, points, lines. motions, and the like. Harmonic interval (Mus.), the distance between two notes of a chord, or two consonant notes. Harmonical mean (Arith. & Alg.), certain relations of numbers and quantities, which bear an analogy to musical consonances. Harmonic motion,
Harmonical or Musical
Proportion Pro*por"tion, n. [F., fr. L. proportio; pro before + portio part or share. See Portion.] 1. The relation or adaptation of one portion to another, or to the whole, as respect magnitude, quantity, or degree; comparative relation; ratio; as, the proportion of the parts of a building, or of the body. The image of Christ, made after his own proportion. --Ridley. Formed in the best proportions of her sex. --Sir W. Scott. Documents are authentic and facts are true precisely in proportion to the support which they afford to his theory. --Macaulay. 2. Harmonic relation between parts, or between different things of the same kind; symmetrical arrangement or adjustment; symmetry; as, to be out of proportion. ``Let us prophesy according to the proportion of faith.' --Rom. xii. 6. 3. The portion one receives when a whole is distributed by a rule or principle; equal or proper share; lot. Let the women . . . do the same things in their proportions and capacities. --Jer. Taylor. 4. A part considered comparatively; a share. 5. (Math.) (a) The equality or similarity of ratios, especially of geometrical ratios; or a relation among quantities such that the quotient of the first divided by the second is equal to that of the third divided by the fourth; -- called also geometrical proportion, in distinction from arithmetical proportion, or that in which the difference of the first and second is equal to the difference of the third and fourth. Note: Proportion in the mathematical sense differs from ratio. Ratio is the relation of two quantities of the same kind, as the ratio of 5 to 10, or the ratio of 8 to 16. Proportion is the sameness or likeness of two such relations. Thus, 5 to 10 as 8 to 16; that is, 5 bears the same relation to 10 as 8 does to 16. Hence, such numbers are said to be in proportion. Proportion is expressed by symbols thus: a:b::c:d, or a:b = c:d, or a/b = c/d. (b) The rule of three, in arithmetic, in which the three given terms, together with the one sought, are proportional. Continued proportion, Inverse proportion, etc. See under Continued, Inverse, etc. Harmonical, or Musical, proportion, a relation of three or four quantities, such that the first is to the last as the difference between the first two is to the difference between the last two; thus, 2, 3, 6, are in harmonical proportion; for 2 is to 6 as 1 to 3. Thus, 24, 16, 12, 9, are harmonical, for 24:9::8:3. In proportion, according as; to the degree that. ``In proportion as they are metaphysically true, they are morally and politically false.' --Burke.
Harmonicon
Harmonicon Har*mon"i*con, n. A small, flat, wind instrument of music, in which the notes are produced by the vibration of free metallic reeds.
Harmonics
Harmonics Har*mon"ics, n. 1. The doctrine or science of musical sounds. 2. pl. (Mus.) Secondary and less distinct tones which accompany any principal, and apparently simple, tone, as the octave, the twelfth, the fifteenth, and the seventeenth. The name is also applied to the artificial tones produced by a string or column of air, when the impulse given to it suffices only to make a part of the string or column vibrate; overtones.
Harmonies
Harmony Har"mo*ny, n.; pl. Harmonies. [ F. harmonic, L. harmonia, Gr. ? joint, proportion, concord, fr. ? a fitting or joining. See Article. ] 1. The just adaptation of parts to each other, in any system or combination of things, or in things, or things intended to form a connected whole; such an agreement between the different parts of a design or composition as to produce unity of effect; as, the harmony of the universe. 2. Concord or agreement in facts, opinions, manners, interests, etc.; good correspondence; peace and friendship; as, good citizens live in harmony. 3. A literary work which brings together or arranges systematically parallel passages of historians respecting the same events, and shows their agreement or consistency; as, a harmony of the Gospels. 4. (Mus.) (a) A succession of chords according to the rules of progression and modulation. (b) The science which treats of their construction and progression. Ten thousand harps, that tuned Angelic harmonies. --Milton. 5. (Anat.) See Harmonic suture, under Harmonic. Close harmony, Dispersed harmony, etc. See under Close, Dispersed, etc. Harmony of the spheres. See Music of the spheres, under Music. Syn: Harmony, Melody. Usage: Harmony results from the concord of two or more strains or sounds which differ in pitch and quality. Melody denotes the pleasing alternation and variety of musical and measured sounds, as they succeed each other in a single verse or strain.
Harmonious
Harmonious Har*mo"ni*ous, a. [Cf. F. harmonieux. See Harmony.] 1. Adapted to each other; having parts proportioned to each other; symmetrical. God hath made the intellectual world harmonious and beautiful without us. --Locke. 2. Acting together to a common end; agreeing in action or feeling; living in peace and friendship; as, an harmonious family. 3. Vocally or musically concordant; agreeably consonant; symphonious. -- Har*mo"ni*ous*ly, adv. -- Har*mo"ni*ous*ness, n.
Harmoniously
Harmonious Har*mo"ni*ous, a. [Cf. F. harmonieux. See Harmony.] 1. Adapted to each other; having parts proportioned to each other; symmetrical. God hath made the intellectual world harmonious and beautiful without us. --Locke. 2. Acting together to a common end; agreeing in action or feeling; living in peace and friendship; as, an harmonious family. 3. Vocally or musically concordant; agreeably consonant; symphonious. -- Har*mo"ni*ous*ly, adv. -- Har*mo"ni*ous*ness, n.
Harmoniousness
Harmonious Har*mo"ni*ous, a. [Cf. F. harmonieux. See Harmony.] 1. Adapted to each other; having parts proportioned to each other; symmetrical. God hath made the intellectual world harmonious and beautiful without us. --Locke. 2. Acting together to a common end; agreeing in action or feeling; living in peace and friendship; as, an harmonious family. 3. Vocally or musically concordant; agreeably consonant; symphonious. -- Har*mo"ni*ous*ly, adv. -- Har*mo"ni*ous*ness, n.
Harmoniphon
Harmoniphon Har*mon"i*phon, n. [Gr.? harmony + ? sound.] (Mus.) An obsolete wind instrument with a keyboard, in which the sound, which resembled the oboe, was produced by the vibration of thin metallic plates, acted upon by blowing through a tube.
Harmonist
Harmonist Har"mo*nist, Harmonite Har"mo*nite, n. (Eccl. Hist.) One of a religious sect, founded in W["u]rtemburg in the last century, composed of followers of George Rapp, a weaver. They had all their property in common. In 1803, a portion of this sect settled in Pennsylvania and called the village thus established, Harmony.
Harmonist
Harmonist Har"mo*nist, n. [Cf. F. harmoniste.] 1. One who shows the agreement or harmony of corresponding passages of different authors, as of the four evangelists. 2. (Mus.) One who understands the principles of harmony or is skillful in applying them in composition; a musical composer.
Harmonite
Harmonist Har"mo*nist, Harmonite Har"mo*nite, n. (Eccl. Hist.) One of a religious sect, founded in W["u]rtemburg in the last century, composed of followers of George Rapp, a weaver. They had all their property in common. In 1803, a portion of this sect settled in Pennsylvania and called the village thus established, Harmony.
Harmonium
Harmonium Har*mo"ni*um, n. [NL. See Harmony. ] A musical instrument, resembling a small organ and especially designed for church music, in which the tones are produced by forcing air by means of a bellows so as to cause the vibration of free metallic reeds. It is now made with one or two keyboards, and has pedals and stops.

Meaning of Harmon from wikipedia

- Harmon may refer to: Ernest Harmon Air Force Base, also known as Harmon, a former United States military installation Harmon Links, a golf course in Stephenville...
- Daniel James Harmon (born January 3, 1973) is an American writer, producer, and actor. He is best known as the creator and producer of the NBC/Yahoo! Screen...
- Thomas Mark Harmon (born September 2, 1951) is an American actor. He is known for playing the lead role of Leroy Jethro Gibbs in NCIS. He also appeared...
- Angela Mic****e Harmon (born August 10, 1972) is an American actress and model. She won Seventeen's modeling contest in 1987 at age 15, signed with IMG...
- Kelly Jean Harmon Miller (née Harmon; born November 9, 1948) is an American actress and model, best known for appearing in a series of television commercials...
- Richard Scott Harmon is a Canadian actor. His roles on television include John Murphy in The CW's The 100, Jasper Ames in The Killing and Julian Randol...
- The Harmon was a high-rise building at the CityCenter development in Paradise, Nevada. The tower was designed by Foster + Partners as a non-gaming boutique...
- Harmon Harmon (born May 15, 1980) is a sprint athlete, who competes for the Cook Islands. Harmon competed at the 2004 Summer Olympics in the 100 metres...
- Thomas Dudley Harmon (September 28, 1919 – March 15, 1990), known as Tom Harmon, as well as by the nickname "Old 98", was an American football player...
- Elizabeth Harmon is a fictional character and the main protagonist in the Walter Tevis novel The Queen's Gambit and the Netflix drama miniseries of the...