Definition of Army. Meaning of Army. Synonyms of Army

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Definition of Army

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Army organization
Army organization Army organization The system by which a country raises, classifies, arranges, and equips its armed land forces. The usual divisions are: (1) A regular or active army, in which soldiers serve continuously with the colors and live in barracks or cantonments when not in the field; (2) the reserves of this army, in which the soldiers, while remaining constantly subject to a call to the colors, live at their homes, being summoned more or less frequently to report for instruction, drill, or maneuvers; and (3) one or more classes of soldiers organized largely for territorial defense, living at home and having only occasional periods of drill and instraction, who are variously called home reserves (as in the table below), second, third, etc., line of defense (the regular army and its reserves ordinarily constituting the first line of defense), territorial forces, or the like. In countries where conscription prevails a soldier is supposed to serve a given number of years. He is usually enrolled first in the regular army, then passes to its reserve, then into the home reserves, to serve until he reaches the age limit. It for any reason he is not enrolled in the regular army, he may begin his service in the army reserves or even the home reserves, but then serves the full number of years or up to the age limit. In equipment the organization of the army is into the three great arms of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, together with more or less numerous other branches, such as engineers, medical corps, etc., besides the staff organizations such as those of the pay and subsistence departments.
Army worm
Army worm Ar"my worm` (Zo["o]l.) (a) A lepidopterous insect, which in the larval state often travels in great multitudes from field to field, destroying grass, grain, and other crops. The common army worm of the northern United States is Leucania unipuncta. The name is often applied to other related species, as the cotton worm. (b) The larva of a small two-winged fly (Sciara), which marches in large companies, in regular order. See Cotton worm, under Cotton.
Center of an army
Center Cen"ter, n. [F. centre, fr. L. centrum, fr. round which a circle is described, fr. ? to prick, goad.] 1. A point equally distant from the extremities of a line, figure, or body, or from all parts of the circumference of a circle; the middle point or place. 2. The middle or central portion of anything. 3. A principal or important point of concentration; the nucleus around which things are gathered or to which they tend; an object of attention, action, or force; as, a center of attaction. 4. The earth. [Obs.] --Shak. 5. Those members of a legislative assembly (as in France) who support the existing government. They sit in the middle of the legislative chamber, opposite the presiding officer, between the conservatives or monarchists, who sit on the right of the speaker, and the radicals or advanced republicans who occupy the seats on his left, See Right, and Left. 6. (Arch.) A temporary structure upon which the materials of a vault or arch are supported in position until the work becomes self-supporting. 7. (Mech.) (a) One of the two conical steel pins, in a lathe, etc., upon which the work is held, and about which it revolves. (b) A conical recess, or indentation, in the end of a shaft or other work, to receive the point of a center, on which the work can turn, as in a lathe. Note: In a lathe the live center is in the spindle of the head stock; the dead center is on the tail stock. Planer centers are stocks carrying centers, when the object to be planed must be turned on its axis. Center of an army, the body or troops occupying the place in the line between the wings. Center of a curve or surface (Geom.) (a) A point such that every line drawn through the point and terminated by the curve or surface is bisected at the point. (b) The fixed point of reference in polar co["o]rdinates. See Co["o]rdinates. Center of curvature of a curve (Geom.), the center of that circle which has at any given point of the curve closer contact with the curve than has any other circle whatever. See Circle. Center of a fleet, the division or column between the van and rear, or between the weather division and the lee. Center of gravity (Mech.), that point of a body about which all its parts can be balanced, or which being supported, the whole body will remain at rest, though acted upon by gravity. Center of gyration (Mech.), that point in a rotating body at which the whole mass might be concentrated (theoretically) without altering the resistance of the intertia of the body to angular acceleration or retardation. Center of inertia (Mech.), the center of gravity of a body or system of bodies. Center of motion, the point which remains at rest, while all the other parts of a body move round it. Center of oscillation, the point at which, if the whole matter of a suspended body were collected, the time of oscillation would be the same as it is in the actual form and state of the body. Center of percussion, that point in a body moving about a fixed axis at which it may strike an obstacle without communicating a shock to the axis. Center of pressure (Hydros.), that point in a surface pressed by a fluid, at which, if a force equal to the whole pressure and in the same line be applied in a contrary direction, it will balance or counteract the whole pressure of the fluid.
Farmyard
Farmyard Farm"yard`, n. The yard or inclosure attached to a barn, or the space inclosed by the farm buildings.
Salvation Army
Salvation Sal*va"tion, n. [OE. salvacioun, sauvacion, F. salvation, fr. L. salvatio, fr. salvare to save. See Save.] 1. The act of saving; preservation or deliverance from destruction, danger, or great calamity. 2. (Theol.) The redemption of man from the bondage of sin and liability to eternal death, and the conferring on him of everlasting happiness. To earn salvation for the sons of men. --Milton. Godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation. --2. Cor. vii. 10. 3. Saving power; that which saves. Fear ye not; stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord, which he will show to you to-day. --Ex. xiv. 13. Salvation Army, an organization for prosecuting the work of Christian evangelization, especially among the degraded populations of cities. It is virtually a new sect founded in London in 1861 by William Booth. The evangelists, male and female, have military titles according to rank, that of the chief being ``General.' They wear a uniform, and in their phraseology and mode of work adopt a quasi military style.
Standing army
Standing Stand"ing, a. 1. Remaining erect; not cut down; as, standing corn. 2. Not flowing; stagnant; as, standing water. 3. Not transitory; not liable to fade or vanish; lasting; as, a standing color. 4. Established by law, custom, or the like; settled; continually existing; permanent; not temporary; as, a standing army; legislative bodies have standing rules of proceeding and standing committees. 5. Not movable; fixed; as, a standing bed (distinguished from a trundle-bed). Standing army. See Standing army, under Army. Standing bolt. See Stud bolt, under Stud, a stem. Standing committee, in legislative bodies, etc., a committee appointed for the consideration of all subjects of a particular class which shall arise during the session or a stated period. Standing cup, a tall goblet, with a foot and a cover. Standing finish (Arch.), that part of the interior fittings, esp. of a dwelling house, which is permanent and fixed in its place, as distinguished from doors, sashes, etc. Standing order (Eccl.), the denomination (Congregiational) established by law; -- a term formerly used in Connecticut. See also under Order.

Meaning of Army from wikipedia

- An army (from Latin arma "arms, weapons" via Old French armée, "armed" [feminine]), ground force or land force is a fighting force that fights primarily...
- The United States Army (USA) is the land service branch of the United States Armed Forces. It is one of the eight U.S. uniformed services, and is designated...
- This Is the Army is a 1943 American wartime musical comedy film produced by Hal B. Wallis and Jack L. Warner, and directed by Michael Curtiz, adapted from...
- British Army is the prin****l land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2020[update], the British Army comprises...
- The Indian Army is the land-based branch and the largest component of the Indian Armed Forces. The President of India is the Supreme Commander of the Indian...
- The Workers' and Peasants' Red Army, frequently shortened to Red Army, was the army and the air force of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic...
- The Salvation Army (TSA) is a Christian church and an international charitable organisation. The organisation reports a worldwide membership of over 1...
- Indian Army. These ranks generally correspond with those of Western militaries, and in particular reflect those of the British and Commonwealth armies. Traditional...
- The ****stan Army (Urdu: پاکستان فوج‎) is the prin****l land warfare branch of the ****stan Armed Forces. The roots of its modern existence trace back...
- The Great Heathen Army (Old English: mycel hæþen here), also known as Great Danish Army or the Viking Great Army, was a coalition of Scandinavian warriors...
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